North Dakota American Legion Post Histories

The following Post Histories were submitted by the Posts. The History Committee has attempted to include histories of every Post that ever existed in North Dakota. Unfortunately, there is no written history of some of these Posts so the only thing that is included here is the name of the Post and the namesake(s) of the Post and, unfortunately, it isn’t possible to identify the Post namesake in some instances.

Post 1 Bismarck

There were 16 charter members: Arthur Jones, Fred K. Schnecker, Paul M. Jewell, Ambrose H. Galliger, W. H. McGraw, Lester F. Powers, Harold V. Semling, Philip M. Webb, Lewis Warren, Donald McPhee, Charles Spiro, Fred L. Page, Noel Thoraldson, Gerald L. Richolt, Frank G. Hydden and Robert Treacy.

The first officers of the post were: Arthur R. Jones, commander; Phillip H. Webb, vice-commander; Paul M. Jewell, adjutant; P. G. Harrington, finance officer; M. B. Gilman, chaplain; Ambrose Galliger, historian and Emil Bressler, sergeant-at-arms. They were extended greetings by the local post of the Grand Army of the Republic, with the invitation to appear with them in uniform at the Memorial Day services.

Namesake

Private Spetz was with Company A of the 164th Infantry and met his death at the Toul Sector of the west front in France. Private Lloyd William Spetz who was the first man from Burleigh County to lose his life in service to his country in World War I. Spetz was born in Underwood, North Dakota April 18, 1894.  He enlisted in the Company A, 1st Infantry, North Dakota National Guard on May 2, 1917 in Bismarck, North Dakota.  He served in Company A, 1st Infantry, 164th Infantry to January 9, 1918 and in Company K, 18th Infantry.  He served overseas from December 15, 1917 in France and was Killed in Action in the Toul Sector of the west front in France on March 1, 1918.  He is buried at the St. Mihiel American Cemetery in Thiaucourt, Meurthe-et-Moselle, France.  Among other decorations and awards he received a silver star for gallantry in action.

History

The newly formed post staged numerous activities during its first few months to raise funds to host the first department convention in the fall of 1919. A membership drive was started and the post grew in its first two years to nearly 500 members.

By 1925, the memories of military life and the bonds of mutual service were being forgotten as the men got back to civilian life. This was a period when it was a struggle to keep the post alive and plan interesting programs. It was during this time the post fell to its lowest membership of 200.

After that period, membership and activities kept increasing. By its 50th anniversary celebration in 1969, membership was over 2,000 for the first time. The membership peaked at over 2,600 in the early ’70s. The 1994 membership was 1,239.

Karl Riedel was the last man of the World War I veterans and he was presented the “last man award,” a bottle of spirits, on Nov. 11, 1994, which also happened to be Karl’s 101st birthday. A large number of our comrades have been transferred to Post Everlasting in the last 10 years.

Since its beginning, the members of Post #1 have never been hesitant to attack actions, utterances or displays which are not representative of true Americanism. In its early years of existence, Americanism and service to veterans, widows and orphans were the primary concerns of the organization. On the lighter side, basketball teams were organized, wrestling and boxing matches held, and a Post Quartet often led group singing.

In 1922, bugles arrived in preparation of forming a drum and bugle corps. In 1927, the Corps was officially organized under the direction of Spencer Boise. The Drum and Bugle Corps of Post #1 was officially named the “Governaires” in 1959, by Gov. John E. Davis. There were performances at national and state conventions, and many community events. The Corps entered competition at the national and state level and won many championships. They had an impressive career. Many of the trophies are still on display. The Corps disbanded in 1989 after performing in the North Dakota Centennial celebration parade.

American Legion baseball had its beginnings in 1927 at Bismarck. John Karasaweisz was appointed athletic officer in charge of baseball. Through the years the program grew and in later years as many as four teams were sponsored by the post. Presently, there are three teams.  The first team has carried the name of “Governors” for many years. This team has been state champion several times. Post #1 has been host to regional, sectional and national tournaments, plus many state tournaments. Baseball is the largest program of Post No. 1.

In 1929, natural gas arrived in Bismarck. A group of Legionnaires met to discuss what should be done with coal that everyone had left in their homes. A plan was prepared to redistribute the coal to the needy who could not readily convert to natural gas. This group of Legionnaires could be the fathers of the “Open Your Heart” program sponsored by Post #1 to distribute food baskets and provide clothing to children through age 13 in needy families at Christmas. Funds are solicited from the community to finance this highly successful project. Well over $30,000 per year has been donated in recent years, which does not include large amounts of canned food donated by school children in the community. As many as 500 food baskets have been distributed in one season and over $10,000 spent for children is clothing. For many years the program reached out a considerable distance from Bismarck, but the program is now restricted to Burleigh County.

Members of this post have been in the forefront of the State Oratorical program for a long time, from sponsoring contests on the local level to hosting the national contest. The Conrad Leifur oratorical traveling trophy, which is placed at the state oratorical champion’s high school, originated in Bismarck. Leifur, a past commander of Post 1, served as state chairman of the oratorical program. Charles Schroeder served many years as director of the department oratorical contest and currently Vern Fetch fills that position.

The Boys State program has always been well supported. Up to 40 young men have been sponsored in one year. Several of the attendees have become Boys State Governor  and gone on to Boys Nation. Programs that are still being sponsored are Americanism, Child Welfare, Scholarships, Employment of the Handicapped and Public Relations. Veterans Day and Memorial Day have been faithfully observed with programs. Color guards and honor guards have been provided.

The post has had several homes since its beginning. The Elks Club facilities and the A.O.U.W. Hall were both utilized as meeting places before the World War Memorial Building was completed in 1930. The building committee of the post expended a lot of effort to make the World War Memorial building a reality, which gave Post #1 a permanent home. In 1943, the first veterans club was started on Main Street between 3rd & 4th Street. It was later changed to the American Legion Club.

In 1949, planning began for a new post home. A new building committee was appointed in 1950. In March 1951, a new building was dedicated on the corner of 3rd Street and Rosser Avenue. This structure served as the post home and provided the best club facilities in the state for many years. It remained the headquarters for Post #1 for the next 43 years. However, in 1994, it became obvious that it was necessary to downsize the Post I club operations. So planning was initiated to sell the building and to relocate the post and club operations to a smaller site where facilities can be maintained on a cost-effective basis. From that base, Post I will continue to fulfill the purposes of The American Legion.

Luther Monson was given an Honorary Past Commander Award in 1967 for his many years of exemplary service as Service Officer, as a 25-year member of the Drum and Bugle Corps and a 35-year member of the Open Your Heart committee.

Roster of Bismarck’s Post 1 Commanders

A different Legionnaire has served as commander each year of the post’s existence. One Legionnaire has served twice, but not in consecutive years.

1919 ….A. A. Jones

1919-20…George Russ, Jr.

1920-21…William Paulson

1921-22 …Walter Sather

1922-23 …Ferris Cordner

1923-24 …Phillip Webb

1924-25…L. P. Warren    

1925-26…W. E. Cole    

1926-27 … John Musolf    

1927-28… Reinhart Kamplin    

1928-29… A. L. Fosteson    

1929-30…Carl Knudtson    

1930-31…A.D. McKinnon    

1931-32… Spencer Boise    

1932-33 …Robert Dohn        

1933-34… Edward Trepp    

1934-35 …Kenneth W. Simons   

1935-36 … Milton Rue, Sr.

1936-37 . ..Harry Rosenthal

1937-38… L.V. Miller

1938-39 …John Spare  

1939-40… William Yegen  

1940-41 …Steve Arman   

1941-42..R.R. Nelson    

1942-43… Conrad W. Leifur

1943-44…M.B. Gilman

1944-45… Donald McPhee      

1945-46…Herman Brocopp    

1946-47… Archie McGray   

1947-48… Jack MacLachIan        

1948-49… H.D. Dunahay      

1949-50…Wayne Carrol    

1950-51 … Earl Boyd   

1951-52 …GiIbert Olson

1952-53 … Elmer Wahlund

1953-54 …Sam Tolchinsky

1955-56…Leonard Dalsted

56-57…Elmer Farnam

1957-58… Noah Grad

1958-59… Lawrence Peterson

1959-60… Eldred Welch

1960-61 …Archie Seebart

1961-62 … Ray Shoff

1962-63 … Richard Iverson

1963-64 … Edward Drashil

1964-65 … Milton Rue, Jr.

1965-66…Joseph J. Thomas

1966-67… Boyd Clemens

1967-68…Charles Schroeder

1968-69 …Ralph Gaugler

1969 70…George Neigum

1970-71…Aaron Dalke

1971 72… John Kopp

1972-73…Mike Thompson

1973-74…John Conyne

1974-75 …Ernst Pohlig

1975-76… Gayle Doherty

1976-77…R.H. Anderson

1977-78… Vern Fetch

1978-79… Robert G. Roesler

1979-80…Harold E. Wolfe

1980-81…Roy Putz

1981-82…Ken Yeiter

1982-83…Howard Wolfe

1983-84… Joe Smith

1984-85… Mel Bentz

1985-86… Jane LaFromboise

1986-87… Dennis Berg

1987-88 … Dennis E. Mock

1988-89… Adrian Crowfeather

1989-90 …Joe Smith

1990-91…Don Robinson

1991-92 …Marly McDonald

1992-93 … Rick Ryan

1993-94 …. Bob Johnston

Post 2 Fargo

The North Dakota American Legion Post 2, Gilbert C. Grafton Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, First District and located in Fargo, North Dakota.

Charter

The Gilbert C. Grafton Post 2 received its national organizational charter on July 21, 1919.

Namesake

Gilbert Collins Grafton

Gilbert Collins Grafton was born in Bowden, England, Oct. 6, 1860. He enlisted in Company B, 1st Infantry, North Dakota National Guard June 14, 1885. On July 15, 1888, he was discharged as a First Sergeant. On that same date, he re-enlisted with the rank of Captain. From 1888 to 1917, he was discharged and re-enlisted four more times. He was last called to active duty July 15, 1917, as a Lieutenant Colonel and was assigned to Field and Staff, 164th Infantry.

He died at Camp Hospital 24, AEF, Feb. 5, 1919, and was buried in France. Although Lt. Col. Grafton was born in England and died in France, he was very much a Fargoan wherever he served; thus, North Dakota’s largest American Legion post proudly bears his name!

History

The seeds of The American Legion were planted at the Paris Caucus March 15-17, 1919. These seeds were nurtured at the St. Louis Caucus May 8-10, 1919. At the Paris Caucus, planning strategies were developed and Matthew W. Murphy was subsequently appointed to organize and represent North Dakota. Murphy was unable to serve in this capacity, so Julius R. Baker of Fargo was appointed temporary state chairman and Jack Williams of Fargo, the temporary state secretary. In addition to Baker and Williams, William Stern and Arthur Gorman, all of Fargo, attended the St. Louis Caucus.

Lloyd Spetz Post  1 of Bismarck was the first American Legion post in North Dakota, organized on May 21, 1919. While much of the originating work of The American Legion in North Dakota took place in Fargo (statewide meetings on April 10 and May 3), Gilbert C. Grafton Post 2 became the second post organized in the state, beginning with a meeting of returned servicemen held May 29, 1919.

Less than two months later (July 21), Post 2 hosted a Homecoming Celebration for returned servicemen, in cooperation with the Commercial Club of Fargo. There also was a meeting at the Fargo Auditorium, with Jack Sullivan of Seattle, national vice-chairman of the Legion, the principal speaker. Then a parade was held in which a thousand Fargo servicemen participated. This was followed by a barbecue in Island Park, where over 6,000 returned veterans were served. The gathering was completed with the vets attending the North Dakota State Fair and a carnival on the streets of Fargo, which lasted until daylight! In September, the post invited the ladies of Company B Auxiliary (Red Cross Canteen Unit) to serve as an auxiliary to the post. They have served since then, even though the national American Legion Auxiliary had not yet been organized.

Charter Members and Officers

By the end of 1919, the Fargo post already had 888 members. Permanent officers for Post 2 were elected in December 1919. They were: Commander, John P. Conmy; Vice-Commander, Dan D. McClaren; Adjutant, Remley E. Myers; Finance Officer, William Stern; Historian, Edwin S. Peterson; Chaplain, William Gleason, and Dr. J.B. Aylen, Seth Richardson and Lawrence W. Hamm as members of the executive board.

The first state convention was held in Bismarck Oct. 16-17, 1919. C.L. (Dad) Dawson of Beach was elected the first department commander. Jack Williams was elected department adjutant and William Stern, the department sergeant-at-arms, both of Fargo. Since then, Post 2 of Fargo has provided all three department adjutants as well as six department commanders and four of the five honorary department commanders, and the longest serving department chaplain in the history of the department.

Programs

During the years from 1920 to 1994, Gilbert C. Grafton Post 2 has been deeply involved in most programs of both the National and Department of North Dakota, American Legion. These include Boys State and Boys Nation (Fargo was the host post for Boys State in North Dakota for 48 years). The National Oratorical Contest has been a significant program on the Post 2 calend.ar. North Dakota has had only two contestants place in the national finals since the program began in the late 1930s. The first was Harold Pollman of Carrington in 1942. The last was Michele Horner of Fargo in 1983.

In addition to most of the national programs, the Fargo post has worked hard to provide three iron lungs for the Fargo-Moorhead area and the Mile of Dimes fundraising for the March of Dimes campaigns in the 1950s. Gilbert C. Grafton Post also has given strong support to ROTC programs at NDSU and has been involved through the years in national security issues.

Since its inception, Post 2 has shared the organization’s concern for the nation’s disabled veterans and worked to develop hospitalization and rehabilitation programs to care for them. Fargo Legionnaires have a long history of providing volunteer services to patients at the Fargo VA Hospital and granting financial support for special activities for patients there as well as for residents of the North Dakota Veterans Home at Lisbon.

The Gift of Life program, which encourages people toward organ donation and participation in blood drives, has been a long-standing activity of Post 2. Grants totaling $65,800 over a 10-year period to the Fargo Public Schools to get School Patrol Crossings Guards in place evidenced Post 2 concern for public safety, as did its support of the “Light for Safety” automotive safety program way back in 1964. This was obviously the forerunner of the present emphasis on automobile daytime running lights.

As recently as 1987, the Gilbert C. Grafton Post provided the incentive and the land for the “164th Memorial” in tribute to all the servicemen across the state who gave valorous service and endured countless hardships and sacrifices during several wars as members of the l64th Fighting Regiment.

Through the years, members of Gilbert C. Grafton Post have given millions of hours and of dollars in service to God and Country. Without the Fargo American Legion, Legion baseball, Fargo-Moorhead soccer and the Trollwood Park complex would likely not exist as they do today. Gilbert C. Grafton Post 2 makes a difference!

American Legion Baseball

Gilbert C. Grafton Post 2 in Fargo has sponsored American Legion baseball teams since 1928. Over that 66-year period, Post 2 teams have left enviable records for local, state, regional and national competitors to seek for themselves. On top of that, one of its alums holds professional baseball’s most coveted honors. That’s home run king Roger Maris, whose exploits are summarized elsewhere in this Legion history. Maris wasn’t known for flamboyant conversation for public record, but he frequently credited his baseball knowledge and savvy with the experience he gained playing Legion baseball.

Area fans are also rooting for another Fargo American Legion baseball graduate, Rick Helling, to make good in the majors. He was signed to a professional baseball contract by the Texas Rangers in ’92, after drafting him in the first round of the major league baseball draft.

Post 2 teams won 21 state championships, the first in 1929, the second year of Legion baseball in North Dakota, and most recently in 1992. Its teams won four regional titles following state championships in 1933,1969,1989 and 1992.

The success of Post 2’s baseball program and its leaders were recognized nationally. The prize was to host these tournaments: Region 6 (Central Plains) in 1979 and 1987 and the 1983 and 1992 Legion baseball World Series, the latter event in which its ’92 team also competed at Jack Williams Stadium. The 1995 World Series also was scheduled for Jack Williams Stadium. Truly on a roll with its baseball program, Post 2 assembled several top baseball personalities as guest speakers at special banquets in 1980, 1981, 1982 and 1983. In that same period, Post 2 leaders and graduates of local Legion baseball organized a Legion baseball alumni association.

The former players – even one from Post 2’s 1928 squad- came in for weekend reunions that included goodspirited ball games and much reminiscing.

Significant contributor to the Post 2 youth sports program has been the Babe Ruth League. Younger boys are given more opportunities there to learn fundamentals, teamwork and leadership, how to play better and be competitive sportsmen so they can move confidently to upper-level teams. Bill Schilling, Bob Smith, Don Donegan and Carl Anderson – all of whom loved to be around young kids started working with the early teenagers in 1964. That was the beginning of Babe Ruth Baseball in Fargo.

Babe Ruth play took the field with three teams initially; at its peak, there were 12 teams, Anderson recalls. The first year’s team sponsors were Post 2, the Communication Workers of America and Bob Fritz Sporting Goods. Post 2 sponsored at least one team each year, sometimes several teams, depending on getting volunteer Legionnaires as coaches.

Standing tall in Legion baseball, even across the country, is Joe Parmer. He has served as chairman of Post 2’s baseball committee since 1954 and its team manager since 1964. He has been tournament chairman for every Eastern division and state tournament held in Fargo since 1964. Parmer also chaired the Region 6 tourneys and World Series hosted by Post 2, with assistance from Jim McLaughlin as co-chair.

Another long-time leader is Jerry Harter, who has coached Post 2 teams 28 years. His record includes more than 1,200 wins, eight state championships and seven runner-ups, plus a couple of Central Plains Region titles and having two teams play in the Legion World Series. His name was added in 1992 to the seven others from Post 2 in the Legion Baseball Hall of Fame.

State Baseball Titles

Winning its first state championship in 1929, the second year that Legion baseball was played in North Dakota, the team representing Gilbert C. Grafton Post 2 went on to win 20 more titles by 1994, the cutoff for this history.

The only other program collecting two-digit titles is Bismarck with 10. Along the way, Fargo twice had stretches when its teams won three titles in a row, first during 1942-43-44 and soon again in 1946-47-48. Other title years for Post 2 squads were 1933, 1935, 1950, 1952, 1953, 1960, 1969, 1974, 1976, 1979, 1983, 1988, 1989 and 1992 and competed in national level regional competition.

Post 2 Legion Baseball Coaches

1928Charlie Kimball
1929, 1931-35Homer Major
1930Bob Lowe
1936Bud Ruegamer
1937-40, 1951Leo D. Osman
1941John Callihan
1942Charlie Solberg 
1943Ray Baker
1944-45Chet Bujace
1946Jerry Moriarty
1947-48Stan Kostka
1949Leon Lande
1950Chuck Bentson
1952-54Bob Roy 
1955-62Ed Gorrilla
1963Ken Grabinske
1964-65Vern McKee
1966Rolfe Walters
1967-94Jerry Harter

Post 2 Team Managers

1928Charlie Dawson
1929-30Nick Nelson
1935-36Charlie Dawson
1939G.A. Bulis
1942-46N.D. “Bert” Gorman
1947-51J.L. Benshoff
1952-53Leo D. Osman
1954Warren Parmer
1955-58Lee Fett
1959-63Bruce Thomas
1964-94Joe Parmer

 (Names not available for other years)

Post 2 Nominees Inducted into N.D. American Legion Baseball Hall of Fame

Eight nominees from Post 2 have been enshrined into the North-Dakota American Legion Baseball Hall of Fame. They are:

1976Jack Williams
1977Eugene Fitzgerald
1977Roger Maris 
1977George W. Rulon
1980John J. Preboske
1983Joe Parmer
1983Robert W. Smith
1992Jerry Harter

 (Names not available for other years)

State Baseball Titles

Winning its first state championship in 1929, the second year that Legion baseball was played in North Dakota, the team representing Gilbert C. Grafton Post 2 went on to win several more titles.is history.

The only other program collecting two-digit titles is Bismarck with 10. Along the way, Fargo twice had stretches when its teams won three titles in a row, first during 1942-43-44 and soon again in 1946-47-48. Other title years for Post 2 squads were 1933, 1935, 1950, 1952, 1953, 1960, 1969, 1974, 1976, 1979, 1983, 1988, 1989 and 1992 and competed in national level regional competition.

Jack Williams Stadium

When the lights went on at Jack Williams Stadium in June 1966, a new era of baseball opened in Fargo, thanks to Gilbert C. Grafton Post 2 of The American Legion. The post had a leading part in construction of the facility that has become a first-class championship meeting ground.

Jack Williams Stadium was named in honor of the first and long-time North Dakota Legion department adjutant who managed amateur baseball teams prior to service in World War I. Williams also was among the initial supporters who developed American Legion baseball nationally, and starting in 1928 in North Dakota.

For years, Post 2 Legion baseball teams, along with Fargo Park District leagues, had used Barnett Field, home of the former Fargo-Moorhead Twins of the old Northern League. Then, in 1963, the Barnett site disappeared and became part of Fargo North High School. In retrospect, the need for another high school was a godsend for both the Legion and parks baseball programs. Each shifted game times and locations around town to fit into other field owner’s schedules. Parking, seating and other facilities often were minimal. These situations prompted Fargo Legionnaire Lyle Huseby to rally like-mined supporters to get a Legion ballpark. They organized as Baseball for Youth, with Huseby as chairman. Other Post 2 members served the project in various positions: Lyle Selbo, co-chairman; John J. Preboske, finance, and on the project committees: Joe Parmer, Bill Sweeney, Gene Fitzgerald, James Brodigan, Myron Hovden, William Schilling, Bruce Thomas, Robert W. Smith and Glen Rott.

Post 2 agreed to spearhead the drive for funds. Legion groups began the fund drive in early 1965 with $8,500 providing more than 10 percent toward a projected $75,000 cost. Of those initial contributions, $5,000 came from the Legion club, $1,000 each from the 40 and 8 voiture, past commanders club and Auxiliary Unit 2, and $500 from the post band.

Countless hours of volunteered time, money and equipment contributions transformed some seldom-used Park District land along the Red River into a lighted stadium that seats 2,500 fans. Additional seating can increase the capacity to 4,000 for larger events. The field is irrigated and the elevated seating section is backed by team clubhouses, a concessions area, restrooms and overhead press box. Some 16,000 cubic yards of soil were removed from a hillside and leveled to become the base for 18,000 square yards of sod laid in place by scores of volunteers in the summer of 1965. An eight-foot high chain link fence with five access gates encloses the diamond in addition to an 18×100-foot chain link backstop. An electronic scoreboard in right-centerfield was installed in 1981 to replace the original scoreboard constructed in 1966 for the Class A Legion baseball tournament. Paved parking spaces are behind the left field bleachers and north across 12th Avenue North. All of the numerous improvements made to the stadium, which have amounted to hundreds of thousands of dollars, have been paid for by Gilbert C. Grafton Post 2.

At the June 19, 1966, dedication of the stadium, Williams humbly acknowledged the naming of the facility after him. He said it had been his goal in life to help establish, develop and support good programs in shaping youth for future citizenship. Williams died in mid-June 1967. The post hosted its first American Legion Baseball World Series in 1983, again in 1992 in the stadium, and was approved by the Legion’s national Americanism commission to hold the ’95 national finals when this history was written.

Fargo’s Weigel Shares 92 Legion World Series Slugging Title

Brannon Weigel, member of Fargo’s Post 2 squad that won the ’92 Central Plains Region 6 title, continued his heavy hitting in the national finals at Fargo that year to become the co-winner of The American Legion Baseball’s Louisville Slugger Batting Champion award. Weigel shared the honors with Ryan Kritscher of the ’92 national championship Newbury Park Oaks team of Newbury Park, CA, with a .448 tie slugging average recorded for appearances at the plate during regional and national World Series games.

Maris Museum Is Lasting Tribute to a True Hero

Aspiring youngsters gaze in awe at the glassed-in display assembled in Fargo in honor of and respect for superhero and legend Roger Maris. The free museum in the West Acres shopping center also calls up countless memories for old baseball fans who can name the date (the season ended, Sunday, Oct. I, 1961, New York Yankees vs. Boston Red Sox) and the pitcher (right-hander Tracy Stallman) who threw the ball that made Roger Maris a rarity: a true, honest-to-goodness national hero.

Until that moment in the fourth inning, Maris was tied in home runs with longtime baseball legend Babe Ruth. Then, on a 2-0 count, he swung and hit another four-bagger. Sixty-one of them in one regular season established a record that has eluded numerous other sluggers to the time of this review.

Maris began his athletic career at Shanley High School and in American Legion baseball, both in Fargo. He played professional baseball 12 years, starting with the old Northern League’s Fargo-Moorhead Twins, an affiliate of the American League Cleveland Indians. Moving up, he played for the Indians, Kansas City Athletics, New York Yankees and St. Louis Cardinals.

Maris, who had electrified the baseball world and the nation), died Dec. 14, 1985, after a two-year fight against lymphatic cancer. He was 51. Returned to Fargo, his body was buried in Holy Cross Cemetery. On July 22, 1984, Maris’ uniform number 9 was retired during an Old Timer’s Day ceremonies in Yankee Stadium.

The idea for a permanent Maris museum resulted from ‘a breakfast gathering during the 1983 American Legion World Series in Fargo. Moose Skowron and Maris were invited to the World Series games at Jack Williams Stadium. Conversation over coffee with Maris by Legionnaires Bill Weaver, Bob Smith and Jim McLaughlin led to the suggestion that a museum would be a fitting tribute since Maris laid claim to Fargo as his hometown — and Fargo and North Dakota appreciated his saying so.

Roger signed on with the idea, but said the museum had to be in Fargo. While he was born in Hibbing, MN, and then lived in Grand Forks, ND, to age seven, he said Fargo was home because he grew up and played baseball there. Fargo was the only place for it, but it had to have good security and be located where the greatest number of people could enjoy it, he said.

Legion Post 2 in Fargo agreed to sponsor the project. Maris had played on its baseball teams in 1950 and 1951. West Acres manager Fred Anderson was asked about placing the museum in the mall. The idea passed that tryout and next was presented to West Acres developer William Schlossman, who also approved the location. Smith and McLaUghlin went to Maris’ home in Gainesville, FL, to inventory items there and to’ determine the space needed. The potential for displaying the memorabilia was mindboggling. Priceless items included the Golden Glove Award in 1960, American League Most Valuable Player awards in 1960 and 1961, and the S. Rae Hickok Award as the most outstanding professional athlete of the year in 1961.

Maris surprised the Fargoans after their return home: they could have all of his awards and trophies except for the MVP plaques, which were mounted into his home’s fireplace. The three-tier museum is 72 feet long and I 0 feet high. In addition to baseball equipment, numerous photographs and life-size mannequins dressed in baseball uniforms, there is a film of Maris hitting his last 12 home runs in 1961, narrated by Mel Allen.

The museum in the southeast wing of the mall was dedicated June 23, 1984, with Maris and his wife Pat in attendance. Then-Gov. Allen I. Olson thanked Maris for always remembering his home area, saying “You made our buttons pop.” In a return comment to the museum group, Maris said, “I didn’t do anything except put the things in there.”

164th Infantry Monument Erected on Post 2 Land Site

Scattered throughout the United States, there are numerous monuments dedicated to the men and women who have served this nation during its wars. Some of these monuments have become great national shrines, where each year our citizens gather to pay homage to those who first gained our freedom and to those who followed and fought to retain it. Some monuments are soon forgotten, but their continuing recognition is no less well deserved. Somewhere in between are the rest. In Fargo there is one of those which, although infrequently recognized by the community, serve as a graphic reminder of one of the most celebrated incidents in the military history of this state and nation.

On the northeast corner of 3rd Avenue and 5th Street North in Fargo, on a plot provided by the Legion’s Gilbert C. Grafton Post 2, stands a granite monument recognizing the 216 men who were called to active duty in 1941 for a year of intensive training. They were members of Company B and the Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 164th Infantry Regiment, North Dakota National Guard. Four years, nine months and 14 days after their activation, the units returned home. They had proven on the fields of international conflict a citizen soldier could excel, could meet the best the enemy had to offer and could prevail. They served their nation and North Dakota with honor and distinction. They provided North Dakota and its military with an unequaled record of accomplishment.

Dedicated by Major General Alexander P. Macdonald, North Dakota adjutant general, on Oct. 24, 1987, the monument serves as a stark reminder to the citizens of the community of the young men who assembled in North Dakota that cold February of 1941 and set off to begin their year of active service.

Prior to the beginning of World War II, they were part of the 34th Division, but the day after Pearl Harbor they were detached from the division and sent west. They soon found their way to the South Pacific as part of the American Division landing at Guadalcanal on Oct. 13, 1942. There they became part of this nation’s military history – the first United States Army unit to take offensive action in WW II.

The 164th Infantry Regiment was an outstanding military organization that subsequently accumulated over 600 days of jungle combat in Guadalcanal, Bouganville, Leyte, Cebu, Bohol and Negros. Among their many decorations were five Distinguished Service Crosses and a Navy Cross. They suffered a 50% casualty rate, including 325 who did not return. They were training for the scheduled invasion of Japan when the war ended. The 164th Infantry Regiment had succeeded in establishing itself as one of America’s finest fighting units.

There are names on the monument that many of us would recognize. Some became our community leaders; others drifted away, their records lost in the annals of time. Most, however, returned home, picked up their lives as close as possible to when they had left, married, had families and lived meaningful lives in the Fargo-Moorhead area.

They have provided for us the gift of a free and abundant life in these United States. We live under a mantle of freedom provided to us by these same people whose names are inscribed on this monument. The honors that are accorded to them are small payment for their services. We must never allow the citizens of this nation to forget their years of dedication and sacrifice.

Fargo’s Legion Forty & Eight Toy Program

First Santa comes—then it’s The American Legion and the Forty & Eight of Fargo. “Santa and his elves make toys for girls and boys who have trees and Christmas dinners,” wrote Syb Gullickson in 1970, then a reporter for the Sunday Forum of Fargo-Moorhead. “The Legion and Forty & Eight and their toy project volunteers remake toys for the children Santa forgets.”

Since 1947, this annual Christmas project has provided “good as new” renovated toys to underprivileged children so they, too, may experience the joys of Christmas. The program has grown extensively, with thousands of families donating used (and unused) toys—some families have done this over three generations. Through this caring, they have shared in the spirit of Christmas giving along with the hundreds of volunteers who repaired, wrapped and delivered the toys at Christmas time.

A toy project had been an activity of the Fargo Fire Department but had to be given up after World War II due to a lack of space. Voiture Locale 240 of the Forty & Eight, a society of hardworking Legionnaires, took over the effort in 1947. Soon afterwards, Fargo’s Gilbert C. Grafton Post 2 became a project partner.

Distribution of renovated toys jumped from about 35 families in 1947 to 375 needy families with 1,875 children at Christmas 1961. Even with modest fluctuations, the project has grown steadily. For the 10-year period ending in 1994, an average of 2,500 children in 1,300 families received a minimum of three toys each at Christmas. In that period, some of the 10,000 toys readied for each Christmas season have been donated to children of Native American families living on reservations in North and South Dakota. A conservative estimate is that nearly 250,000 toys have been processed for distribution in the project.

Initially, toy repairs: were centered in a building on the John J. Preboske farm located on the then-west edge of Fargo. Preboske served as chairman of the toy project in its early years. Following buildings being destroyed on Preboske’s farm in the 1957 tornado, forcing moving of the work site from one building to another over four years, a 23 by 50 cottage was purchased in 1961 to become the central workshop to repair and paint used toys and also to provide bin space for spare parts. With the growth of stockpiled renovated toys becoming a space problem, a

20 by 30 building addition was constructed. Then in the late 1980s, a 20 by 60 space in a Fargo building was arranged for bicycle repair and storage of reconditioned units waiting for Christmas delivery.

For many years Moorhead and Clay County were included in the Fargo-based toy project. Five years ago the Moorhead American Legion post started its own toy-collection project for distribution in Clay County.

Food baskets also were delivered along with toys to children in underprivileged families in Fargo, but that phase of the giving project was discontinued when other groups concentrated on the holiday food basket program.

The increased use of plastics in the manufacture of toys has had a significant impact on the Legion’s toy project. Where many metal-based toys formerly could be repaired, workers discovered that damaged plastic toys were not repairable. That situation led to the need for getting more good-grade toys from families with children who had outgrown toys still in reusable condition and the need to get some new toys, especially for the hard-to-fill 10-14 year-old age group. About 20 percent of the toy or gift requirements fall into the latter category.

Examples of Fargo businesses giving support to the toy project in 1994 were Interstate Business College, Cablecom of Fargo and Preston’s Cleaners, who invited area residents to drop new gifts at their collection stations. In addition, State Bank of Fargo furnished dolls and wooden toys to customers who dressed the dolls and painted toys for children at Christmas. Susan Jensen, owner of Interstate Business College, was in a needy family and received toys from the project. “They did mean a lot to us,” she says. “I remember one year they gave me a sled to have more mobility with my younger brothers and sisters.” Jensen says she believes that “as a community member it is important that I give back to the community what I received.”

For the past several years, Sunmart Foods stores have provided bins to the public to deposit new and used toys.

Santa’s Village, maintained by the Fargo Park District, is another collection point for toys. In addition, the Fargo Legion Club is a year-around depository for donations to the project.

Annual budgets for the program have increased markedly from a few hundred dollars in its early years to about $8,000 in recent years. Christmas wrapping paper alone costs about $1,000 now. Another $1,000 is spent to buy gifts for certain age brackets. Paint, other supplies and tool costs average over $2,500 a year. Other expenses include utilities at the two workshops, insurance and miscellaneous items. The Fargo Legion post finances all project costs.

A week before Christmas all gifts and toys are moved to the National Guard Armory, which we have been privileged to use cost-free, in preparation for selecting, wrapping and labeling of toys for delivery to families. Names and ages of each child to receive Christmas gifts are received from the Holiday Clearing Bureau.

Shoppers are provided with name, age and gender list and then select three gifts for each child. The gifts are wrapped, labeled and packaged for that family. Deliveries are made on the Sunday prior to Christmas. About 7,000 volunteer hours are donated each year to the project by about 300 volunteers.

The 16 project chairpersons during the life-span of the project, namely, Preboske, Clarence Viestenz, Meirl Bartholomay, Oscar Ostrem, Arnold T. Leverson, John D. West, Theophile Sauvageau, Riley Connelly, Robert Paine, Frank Schaffer, Howard Hanson, Bill Johnson, Huston Galyen, Ray Fertig, Maurice Duvall and Howard Erickson have demonstrated excellent leadership and dedication in effectively directing this program.

Post 2 Boosts Gift of Life Organ and Blood Donor Program

Gilbert C. Grafton Post 2 entered into the Gift of Life’ program during the 1972-73 year. George Nordstrom chaired the initial efforts to stimulate donor card registration among citizens in the community willing to participate in the organ donor program.

Richard Tryhus assumed the Post 2 chair of this program for the next 12 years. Harold Christianson assisted as co-chair for 1974-75 as did Duane Lee for 1976-78. During this period the blood donor program was incorporated into the humanitarian services of the Legion’s Gift of Life program by sponsoring an annual blood donor drive. The blood drive was jointly conducted by Post 2 and Fargo’s VFW Post 753, whose chair was Herman Walla.

The American Legion was instrumental in assisting the Kidney Foundation of the Upper Midwest, headquartered at St. Paul, in part of their fundraising. Post 2 members generously donated their time selling candy for the KF. Some of the candy sellers included Frank Suppa, Bob Long, Howard Erickson, Nordstrom and Christianson. This foundation serves the states of North Dakota, South Dakota and Minnesota. Tryhus was a member of the foundation’s board of directors for three years in the 1970s.

Associated with the efforts to obtain organ donor registrations, the committee secured newspaper advertising funded by cooperating banks in the community. The voluntary registration card, which was the forerunner to the state driver’s license for recording organ donor consent, was subsequently incorporated into the format of the official state driver’s license. This has become the primary instrument for an individual to document willingness to be an organ donor.

For a decade beginning in the mid-1970s, Gilbert C. Grafton Post 2 sponsored an annual dinner for kidney dialysis patients in the Fargo-Moorhead area. Additionally, Post 2 provided direct financial support to the KF for care of kidney patients.

Since the mid-1980s, Dennis Roberts (1985-88), Paul Holvik (1988-89) and Carl Anderson (1989-94) have headed the Post 2 Gift of Life program. The Kidney Foundation of the Upper Midwest presented Volunteer of the Year awards to Department Adjutant Vernon Useldinger in 1974, to Tryhus in 1975 and, in 1977, the Student Volunteer of the Year award to Tryhus’ son, Michael, for extraordinary services rendered to the Gift of Life program.

Post 2 Legion Groups Provide Voluntary Services to Patients at Fargo VA Hospital

Post 2 leader William Stern served on a site selection committee during 1924-25 that ultimately led to the construction and June 29, 1929, dedication of the Veterans Hospital at Fargo.

Utilizing the previously-established service officer network, The American Legion assisted veterans in obtaining medical treatment over the years.

In 1946, The American Legion was one of the veterans’ organizations that met with VA Central Office officials and developed the Department of Veterans Affairs Voluntary Service (VAVS) plan to aid in the rehabilitating and returning the veteran to productive community living. During the following decades, numerous members of the Fargo Legion and Forty et Eight have volunteered their services in providing aid and comfort to hospitalized veterans. Supplied by the parent organizations, they distributed comfort items such as tooth brushes, tooth paste, combs, postage stamps, stationery and canteen books. As the hospital patient load grew, so did the need for more volunteers. Teams were organized to more effectively conduct the veterans stag and other activities.

When television) became a new entertainment medium in the late 1950s, The American Legion and other veterans and fraternal organizations furnished TV sets in patient rooms. Post 2 hosts bingo and lunch several times a week and sponsors blackjack usually once a month, followed by lunch. The post donates money for the on-going TV (cable fees) fund and also participates in special programs honoring hospitalized veterans.

On a daily basis, Legionnaires and Auxiliary ladies volunteer as escorts, lab attendants, pharmacy and file clerks, allowing staff more time to attend to other patient needs. With the increasing emphasis of providing medical care on an outpatient basis, there is a corresponding need for more volunteers among the veterans and fraternal organizations to help relieve patient confusion and stress.

Post 2 is grateful to its many members who have been loyal in providing these special patient services as volunteers at the Fargo VA Hospital. Although records are incomplete as to all their names and years of service, Frank Suppa was recognized with a 20-year pin for his lengthy 1975-94 service as The American Legion’s VAVS representative to the VA’s medical center at Fargo.

Donations and volunteers are always appreciated in remembering hospitalized veterans, whose military service helped make our country great and keep it free.

Post 2 Grants $65,000 to Develop School Safety Patrols at Fargo

School safety patrols came about due to the interest of the Fargo Parent-Teacher Association. Due to the increasing vehicle traffic on the streets near some of the elementary schools, the school district administration explored this concern with the Fargo Police Department and the State Highway Department, which had completed a school crossing study in 1980. It was decided the first step would be to secure legislation to enable school districts to establish and organize school safety patrols. This was accomplished in the 1981 legislative session. A district safety patrol committee was formed in March of 1981 to develop a school safety program to be made available to schools.

Since the Minnesota American Legion had supported the school safety patrol programs in that state for many years,

Gilbert C. Grafton Post 2 of Fargo was contacted. It agreed to fund the first year of operation by presenting the school district a check for $10,800. These funds were used to purchase equipment and to train student leaders as well as students to serve as members of the patrol. In addition, some of the funding was used to provide a staff member at each school a monetary stipend for directing the patrol in their school throughout the school year.

The Fargo Legion post continued to support the school patrol financially for 10 years, thus ensuring the patrols got off to a good start. Total financial contributions over the period were approximately $65,800. Four elementary schools participated in the first year 0982-83). Additional schools were added until at the present time (1993-94) patrols are active in eight of the 12 elementary schools. The Fargo Public Schools express their thanks to the Fargo American Legion Post and the AAA of North Dakota for the funding and otherwise supporting the School Safety Patrol program in the Fargo Public Schools.

Easter Baskets Furnished by Fargo Legion Post

In 1959, Easter baskets were prepared for three orphan homes in Fargo-Moorhead. At that time 75 baskets were made by four volunteers. After the orphan homes were discontinued, six other organizations received the baskets for distribution. They are: Nokomis Child Care Center’s two locations in the city, Rape and Abuse Crisis Center, Big Brother-Big Sister, Parent-Child Crisis and Southeast Human Service Center.

About 500 Easter baskets, furnished annually by Gilbert C. Grafton Post 2, are currently being made by 20 volunteers. Lou Soper chaired the program when it was begun 35 years ago, followed by Christie Madsen Byers, and Boots Anderson has headed this charitable project in recent years.

Fargo Legion Hosts Boys State Program 48 Years

The American Legion’s Boys State program has had Gilbert C. Grafton Post 2 in Fargo as its host post for 48 years (1947-94), inclusive. During that near-half century, the post’s color guards served at the opening ceremonies, performing flag retreat and posting the colors at assembly. In the early years, personnel from the post met incoming trains at the Great Northern and Northern Pacific railroad depots and, with as many as 10 buses, transported the Boys State delegates to dormitories on the NDSU campus.

Post 2 has supported Boys State; including financing up to 15 delegates yearly and often paying for the first staff luncheon and evening banquet prior to delegates arriving at Fargo. On Wednesday evenings, Post 2’s baseball committee sponsored a free doubleheader ball game in recent years at Jack Williams Stadium. Statewide Legionnaires were invited to attend this total American Legion function. Post 2 has always been ready to provide Boys State with needed items, such as flags and flag stands.

Fargo Veteran Groups Endorse Using Memorial Funds for Civic Center

Much credit for building the Fargo City Hall-Civic Memorial Auditorium went to Fargo veterans’ organizations, including Gilbert C. Grafton Post 2 of The American Legion. In June 1955, the Veterans Memorial Committee formed to develop a unified position on how and where to use the Fargo share of a countywide veterans’ memorial fund to go toward construction of the downtown facilities.

Cass County had levied $100,000 each year for three years, ending in 1957. The authorization provided that Fargo receive 55 per cent of the total intake, or about $165,000. Rural Cass veterans’ posts shared about $135,000, also for veterans memorials.

Ideas flourished about ways to spend the Fargo share. Then, in early April 1956, the three men on the vets committee advised the city commission that their organizations approved the use of the $165,000 vets’ memorial fund for construction of the civic center. On May 15, 1956, Fargo voters approved a $1,725,000 bond issue in a special election. The bonds were to finance construction of a veterans’ memorial auditorium and a new city hall, both in an urban renewal area occupied formerly by substandard housing and some small businesses.

Post 2 Commander John West was a member of the Veterans Memorial Committee along with John J. O’Keefe, a past state commander of the Disabled American Veterans and a past adjutant of the Fargo chapter, and Robert Borgie, a past district commander of the Veterans of Foreign Wars. West credits downtown businessman William A. Schlossman with directing a citywide committee that successfully educated the public about merits of the bond issue and the veterans’ contribution to the project. “He was extremely effective,” West said. “He picked it up from us and ran the campaign.”

The new auditorium provided Fargo’s growing community with a sorely needed enclosed facility to accommodate conventions, athletic events, traveling shows and other large audiences. A plaque in the Memorial Auditorium bears this inscription: “In memory of our veterans who served that we might build toward peace and security for all – 1959.” The lasting agreement honoring the Fargo men and women who served in U.S. armed forces is that their veterans organizations pay one-half of the rate normally charged to rent auditorium spaces.

Post 2 Provides Thrust to Fargo Soccer Program

A grouping of soccer fields and playground space, aptly called the Fargo American Legion Soccer Complex, took form in north Fargo in late 1970 and has grown, with almost $216,000 in direct aid to the city park district. From 250 boys and girls enrolled in the spring of 1978, the soccer program and facilities has expanded to serve more than 2,900 Fargo and Moorhead children into 1994.

In 1977, several soccer enthusiasts moved into the F-M area but learned soon that there were no soccer fields and, even worse, there were no plans to fill the void. The families formed a non-profit corporation for youth to participate and compete in soccer, beginning in early 1978. By that fall, the all-volunteer organization had expanded to involve 800 youths. The rapid growth of interest in soccer under sponsorship of the interested parties caught the attention of Fargo Legionnaire Bob Lechner. He approached the Fargo Post 2 executive committee in June 1979 with the idea of helping fund the needs of the program, which then involved more than 1,000 boys and girls. The committee agreed and met with soccer board members to determine how to proceed.

By spring 1980, some 1,700 youths on 88 teams were registered, making obvious the need for more fields. Several locations were examined by Fargo Park District Superintendent Bob Johnson and soccer board and Post 2 representatives.

Four years after the initial local push began; the Fargo Park Board approved a plan Feb. II, 1981, to renovate Johnson Park between 8th and 11th Avenues North and 14th and 15th Streets into a top-quality soccer complex. This led to the Fargo Legion joining forces with the park district and the soccer association to make the complex a reality. Post 2 started things off with an $80,000 contribution from gaming profits. The facility includes six fields (two lighted), irrigation system, bridge to cross a drainage ditch that intersects the area, lighted sign, and a playground. The facility was dedicated Sept. 28, 1984.

Fargo Post 2’s contributions to develop this project into the spring of 1994, when more than 2,900 Fargo-Moorhead youth were registered, totaled $215,974. Along with that financial support, Post 2 provided another $196,000 to help run the soccer program. In addition, Post 2 has allowed the F-M Soccer Association to hold its monthly meetings in the post’s hall.

Track and Field, and Wrestling Events

Post 2 already had a long history of sponsoring group athletic competition when, in 1969, some post members felt that individual athletic contests would be worth a try. Orlyen Stensgard became the prime mover of the post’s popular track and field and wrestling programs. As siting at the start were past Commander Bill Schilling and Huston (Hoot) Galyen. From a modest beginning, meets have attracted participants from the mid-west states and from up to 2,500 miles away in the Canadian province of Northwest Territories.

Starting with Fargo Central High School track coach Tom Engan, Stensgard’s first meet for elementary into high school students was considered so successful that the Legion volunteers who helped with timing, judging and distributing ribbon awards agreed to come back again and again. In the spring of 1982, Shanley High

School track coach Neal Jacobson joined forces with Stensgard and the Legion-Shanley meet was then moved to the parochial high school, with competition open to students in all area high schools (grades 9-12). More than 1,000 youth participated each spring.

In 1970, Stensgard took on the production of Legion-sponsored wrestling with help from wrestling Coach Jerry Larson at Agassiz Junior High School. After the first meet at Agassiz, the tournament rotated to a different Fargo public school each year until 1977. Since then, the meet has been held in the Bison Sports Arena on the North Dakota State University campus in Fargo. Stensgard and South High School wrestling coach Lynn Forde and past Post 2 Commander Pete Bilstad are largely responsible for having about 900 grade through high school boys participate each year. The largest turnout was about 1,300 in 1988. Contestants have come from all over North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Iowa, Wisconsin and parts of Canada.

“We feel and know these sports have been very beneficial for the youth of our area and hope they can continue for years to come,” Stensgard said.

Servicemen’s Memorial

A fitting climax to 1972 Memorial Services was the official presentation of a $7,500 Servicemen’s Memorial to the city of Fargo by Gilbert C. Grafton Post 2 of The American Legion. Water in the large fountain, comprising part of the memorial, began to flow as the five flags that also are a permanent part of the total project, whipped in the brisk breeze when Post 2 Commander Orlyen Stensgard made the presentation to Fargo Mayor Herschel Lashkowitz. The memorial is illuminated at night and is visible from Interstate 94 that runs along the southern border of Lindenwood Park on Fargo’s south side, where the memorial is located. This park site along the Red River provides spacious picnic areas, athletic fields and playgrounds for the recreational enjoyment of hundreds of residents and visitors weekly during warm weather months.

Trollwood School of Performing Arts Building

Gilbert C. Grafton Post 2 was by far the largest contributor to the construction of Trollwood Park beyond the parent Fargo Park District. The park is a popular summertime activity center. On weekends, the Fargo Park District sponsors musical entertainment and craft shows. Food booths are available to appease the appetite of the many visitors. The park also features nice picnic areas and playgrounds for family outings.

The Fargo Legion helped build and has its name on the Trollwood School of Performing Arts building that cost over $100,000. The post contributed over $8,000 to the music concerts that were held for several weekends each summer, according to 1983-84 Post 2 Commander Jim Kapitan who was extensively involved with Trollwood.

This school was growing by leaps and bounds, offering classes in all phases of the arts to young people not only from Fargo and Moorhead but also from all over the Dakotas and Minnesota. As the school grew, so did its needs for dance floors, shelters, stages and other items. Post 2 contributed over $20,000 to the Trollwood School over about five years. The school is still growing and is now international with young people participating from around the world, including Russia, China, Africa and Australia.

Fargo Legion Donation Covers Start-up Costs for Diabetes Education Center

Jim and Jan Kapitan’s daughter Jennifer became a diabetic at age three and had to attend diabetes classes in Minneapolis. The family was sent there at the advice of Dr. George Johnson of Fargo. He and Jim discussed the fact that Minneapolis is pretty far to go and expensive to stay for a week in a hotel to attend these classes. Dr. Johnson conceived the idea of starting a Diabetes Education Center in Fargo and Jim went to work raising the money.

The Fargo Legion took the lead in 1978 by contributing $21,000 to cover start-up costs and operational expenses for the first year. Kapitan raised an additional $20,000 from several other organizations for its operations. Articles of incorporation and bylaws were established for the newly-founded Diabetes Education Center at the UNO education building at the VA Center in Fargo. Dr. Johnson was its director and Dr. Juan M. Munoz was its co-director. The board of directors consisted of Jan Kapitan and Nurses Vicki J. Haugen and Lyla L. Rath. Jennifer Kapitan was honored as the first Diabetes Poster Child for North Dakota. Over the course of the next five years (1979-83), the Fargo Legion donated an additional $20,000 toward the Diabetes Education Center.

The Veterans Memorial Bridge spans the Red River between Fargo and Moorhead and is the site of many patriotic programs including Veterans Day and Memorial Day. These events are sponsored by the United Patriotic Bodies of which the Fargo American Legion is a part of.

Past Commanders

During the first 75 years of The American Legion in North Dakota, 78 outstanding individuals served as Post Commander (a few were unable to finish their term and were replaced during the year) at Fargo. Much of the good work for the community, state and nation carried out by Gilbert C. Grafton Post 2 was accomplished because of their leadership.

Six of these past commanders of Post 2 went on to serve in the office of Department Commander and one, Lynn U. Stambaugh served The American Legion as our National Commander. While there are far fewer Post Adjutants, they, along with our past commanders, gave great stability to the largest American Legion post in North Dakota.

Post YearPost CommanderPost Adjutant
1919Leigh MonsonJack Williams
1919-20John P. ConmyRemley E. Myers
1920-21Barry G. CarpenterHarry Rush
1921-22Julius BakerHarry Rush
1922-23Frank I. DarrowHarry Rush
1923-24Emery GestieHarry Rush
1924-25Elmer FlatenHarry Rush
1925-26Seth RichardsonRoy Stranahan
1926-27William SternGeorge N. Powell
1927-28Ed KrausGeorge N. Powell
1928-29C.T. HoversonEarl Shaw
1929-30 (Part)Steve GormanT.O. Kraabel
1929-30 (Part)Lynn U. Stambaugh 
1930-31Lynn U. Stambaugh*T.O. Kraabel
1931-32W.P. ChristensenT.O. Kraabel
1932-33Clair BricknerT.O. Kraabel
1933-34Floyd P. LaVelleT.O. Kraabel
1934-35R.P. BurfeningT.O. Kraabel
1935-36Frank S. TalcottT.O. Kraabel
1936-37Walter R. JohnsonT.O. Kraabel
1937-38A.E.QuamLeigh J. Monson
1938-39Earl ShawClarence H. Olson
1939-40Herbert J, FranekClarence H. Olson
1940-41 (Part)Dave O. BrannH.E. Edhlund
1940-41 (Part)A.E. Ulness 
1941-42Fred R. KnautzH.E. Edhlund
1942-43A.I. JohnsonHerbert J. Franek
1943-44Clarence H. OlsonHerbert J. Franek
1944-45Floyd CollarRomanus J. Downey
1945-46George SouleGeorge Zalusky
1946-47Jack WeedH.E. Edhlund
1947-48C. Warner LittenGlen W. Rott
1948-49Adrian McLellanGlen W. Rott
1949-50George J, ZaluskyGlen W. Rott
1950-51Leonard Van HorneGlen W. Rott
1951-52George ProbstfieldGlen W. Rott
1952-53A.L. LantzGlen W. Rott
1953-54Al J. MontplaisirGlen W. Rott
1954-55John J, PreboskeGlen W. Rott
1955-56 (Part)Donald R. KuehnGlen W. Rott
1955-56 (Part)La Vern Lang 
1956-57Matthew McGahanGlen W. Rott
1957-58John D. WestGlen W. Rott
1958-59Joe ParmerGlen W. Rott
1959-60James J, BrodiganGlen W. Rott
1960-61John J, O’ConnorGlen W. Rott
1961-62Thomas P. NoonanGlen W. Rott
1962-63Duane MunterGlen W. Rott
1963-64LeRoy SmithGlen W. Rott
1964-65Myron HovdenGlen W. Rott
1965-66William C. SchillingGlen W. Rott
1966-67Mike MitzelGlen W. Rott
1967-68Harry W. MooreGlen W. Rott
1968-69Gary WentzGlen W. Rott
1969-70Robert R. StoneGlen W. Rott
1970-71Robert W. SmithGlen W. Rott
1971-72Orlyen StensgardGlen W. Rott
1972-73Frank SuppaMyron Hovden
1973-74Marcus L. McDonaldMyron Hovden
1974-75Robert LongMyron Hovden
1975-76Burton MaxwellMyron Hovden
1976-77Curtis H. NelsonMyron Hovden
1977-78Howard V. EricksonMyron Hovden
1978-79Henry DeyleMyron Hovden
1979-80Harold ChristensenMyron Hovden
1980-81Peter BilstadMyron Hovden
1987-82E. Duane LeeMyron Hovden
1982-83Robert LechnerMyron Hovden
1983-84James KapitanMyron Hovden
1984-85James V. TweeterMyron Hovden
1985-86Donald RapskeMyron Hovden
1986-87James McLaughlinMyron Hovden
1987-88Gerald HalvorsonMyron Hovden
1988-89Ed MurphyMyron Hovden
1989-90Carl AndersonMyron Hovden
1990-91Ed McLaughlinMyron Hovden
1991-92Maryln WeggeOrlyen Stensgard
1992-93Ken NellermoeOrlyen Stensgard
1993-94Tom MillerOrlyen Stensgard

* Lynn U. Stambaugh National Commander: 1941-42

Post 2 Past Commanders Continue to Serve

The Past Commanders Association of Gilbert C. Grafton Post 2 in Fargo was organized in the fall of 1971 to continue promoting and advancing ideals of The American Legion. All but three of the charter members were from Fargo. First-year officers were Emery Gestie, president; John J. O. Connor, vice president, and John Preboske, the secretary-treasurer. Charter and: subsequent first-year membership dues were $10 and $5 thereafter.

Monthly meeting in the early years required payment of $2 each for a 90-cent meal. The difference joined other moneymaking specials, such as Dutch-treat banquets, picnics, horseshoe and dart tournament and football pools.

Operating costs were held to a minimum, although the secretary-treasurer was granted annual increase in salary – $0 in 1972, to $00 in 1973 and to $000 in 1974. This was “to meet inflation,” Preboske said in the association’s financial report dated Jan. 1, 1975.

In addition to keeping past commanders informed and current about post, department and National Legion needs, the organization has made it possible to honor and provide memorials for deceased past commanders.

Post 3 Dickinson

Namesake

Mathew Brew was born in Dickinson, North Dakota on May 20, 1897.  He enlisted in Machine Gun Company, 2nd Infantry, North Dakota National Guard at Dickinson on June 30, 1917 and was called into Federal Service on July 15, 1917.  He died on March 1, 1918 of wounds received in action and was buried in France and later interred in Dickinson.  Among other awards and decorations, he was awarded the Silver Star.

Post 4 Hillsboro

The North Dakota American Legion Post 4, Lynn F. Spiering Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, First District and located in Hillsboro, North Dakota.

Charter

The Lynn F. Spiering Post 4, initially the Hillsboro Post 4, received its national organizational charter on July 21, 1919. On July 8, 1953 the Post changed its name to the Lynn F. Spiering Post 4 designation.

Namesake

Among the many boys who enlisted and went overseas in WW I was Lynn F. Spiering, a member of Co. L of the North Dakota National Guard located at Hillsboro. The members decided that their post should be named after him and so honored his service to his country in this way.

Spiering was born in Hillsboro Nov. 12, 1897, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Spiering. He was a graduate of Hillsboro High School and was employed by the Hillsboro Banner, North Dakota’s oldest weekly newspaper. He enlisted in the National Guard joining Co. L, 164th Infantry, until Jan. 2, 1918, when he was transferred to Co. H.

He served with Co. Huntil the time of his death. He was in service in the battle of Aisne-Marne and others and was killed in action in the battle of Chateau Thierry July 20, 1918. Corporal Spiering was cited for gallantry in action and especially meritorious service. He was entitled to the Silver Star.

The remains of Lynn F. Spiering were brought to the U.S. for burial in 1936, 18 years after his death. His body was identified by his high school class ring. He was given a military funeral in Hillsboro May 24, 1936, conducted by The American Legion and Co. L. The post worked several years toward erecting a monument to the memory of Cpl. Spiering. Erected in Riverside Cemetery at Hillsboro where he was buried, the monument was dedicated May 30, 1939.

History

Lynn F. Spiering Post #4 was chartered July 21, 1919, as the fourth American Legion post in the state. The charter was signed by Julius Baker, state chairman; J.P. (Jack) Williams, state adjutant; Henry D. Lindsley, chairman, and Erick Fisher Wood, secretary of the national executive committee.

Organization of the post took place in the Hillsboro City Hall Aug. 4, 1919, with about 40 WW I veterans present. The following were elected the first officers of Post 4: Commander – Duane Y. Sarles, Vice Commander- Casper Arneson; Post Adjutant – Herbert M. Nash, Historian – A. Duncan Sorum and Finance Officer – Carl J. Sorum.

Memorial Honors and Programs

Honor is given to all veterans and their memories on Memorial Day and Veterans Day by the Legion’s Post 4 and the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post of Hillsboro. White wooden crosses mark the graves of local veterans of all wars. The monument was erected at a cost of $78.51 and another $27.43 was added later for additional materials.

Many community projects and Legion programs have been undertaken by the Hillsboro Legion post. Among those efforts include a swimming and wading pool in Woodland Park, aiding families of members during illness or distress, repairing toys in 1933, American Legion baseball, Boys State and oratorical contests. The post also has sponsored softball games and other youth activities. In addition, the post pledged $5,000 to the Hillsboro H-509 Scholarship Fund, which is to provide an annual scholarship to a graduating high school senior in the name of the Legion’s Lynn F. Spiering Post. In 1962, Post 4 was the proud sponsor of its state championship Class B Legion baseball team.

Post Home

Meeting places were a problem in the early years. Meetings were held the first Friday of each month in the Knights of Pythias Hall the first year, then wandering aimlessly from one meeting place to another until the post found a permanent home in a new brick building which they erected in 1945. The proposed plans called for a building 70 feet long by 25 feet wide at a cost roughly of $3,000.

Meetings are now held on the second Tuesday of each month in the Legion clubrooms. Post #4 officers for 1993-94 were: Commander – Art Morlock, Vice Commanders – Orville Farrell and Jack Hansen, Adjutant – David Manger, Finance Officer – Arthur Grothmann, Historian – Gilmer Gabrielson, Chaplain – Gene Kjos, Sergeant-at-Arms – Art Magnuson and Service Officer – Mert Svaleson.

To help celebrate the 75th anniversary of The American Legion, the post dedicated an honor wall at the Legion Club honoring all past commanders. As part of the 75th celebration July 23, 1994, a barbeque pork feed was sponsored including a pig on a spit and new potatoes. This project was such a good money maker that the post decided to make it an annual event. Proceeds are generally dedicated to a local scholarship fund, cancer research or a variety of other worthwhile causes.

Post 4 accented the success of its diamond jubilee year by enrolling a new all-time high membership of 174.

The American Legion in action at Hillsboro

Post 4 Commanders

Post YearPost Commander
1919-20Duane Y. Sarles
1920-21George F. Robinson
1921-22Sam Baglien
1922-23P.C. Balkan
1923-24G. McLain Johnson
1924-25Ernest E. Johnson
1925-26Ernest A. Iverson
1926-27Oscar L. Hans
1927-28George F. Reyelts
1928-29A. Hvidston
1929-30Paul J. Tehelka
1930-31Clyde Knutson
1931-32Harry M. Anderson
1932-33John S. Flaa
1933-34Julius J.Elster
1934-35Rev. C.L. Covell
1935-36Jorgen Talmo
1936-37Morris Stern
1937-38Conrad M. Leraas
1938-39Clarence Anderson
1939-40Richard T. Jahr
1940-41Paul A. Fankhanel
1941-42Thomas G. Johnson
1942-43Oscar Nelson
1943-44Julius J. Elster
1944-46Robert G. Bovaird
1946-47Gordon Falconer
1947-48Orville Sandsmark
1948-49Harry L. Salisbury
1949-50 (Part)Harold Bohnsack
1949-51Orville Thorson
1951-53Arnold Sorum
1953-56Lloyd Thompson
1956-57Allan W. Arneson
1957-58Kenneth M. Matteson
1958-59James Kress
1959-60Garland Sagen
1960-61Lyle Henning
1961-62Earl Fankhanel
1962-63Oswald V. Bakke
1963-64Hiram Nelson
1964-65Gene Kjos
1965-66John Nelson
1966-67Howard Carver
1967-68Leslie Hams
1968-69Russell S. Smith
1969-70Arthur O. Magnuson
1970-72Galen V. Jeffers
1972-73Truman Swenseid
1973-76Arthur Grove
1976-78Albert Oie
1978-82Ronald Rotvold
1982-83Merton Svaleson
1983-84Arnold Gilbertson
1984-85Douglas Grove
1985-87James Fankhanel
1987-89Lynn Kritzberger
1989-90Bernard Beach
1990-94Arthur Morlock

Post 5 Beach

The North Dakota American Legion Post 5, Harley Salzman Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Eighth District and located in Beach, North Dakota.

Charter

The Harley Salzman Post 5 received its national organizational charter on August 6, 1919.

Namesake

Harley Bertram Salzman was born at Carlock, Illinois on October 8, 1897.  He enlisted in Company M, 2nd Infantry, North Dakota National Guard at Beach, North Dakota on July 20, 1917.  He served with the 164th Ambulance Company, 116th Sanitary Train until his death on January 24, 1918.  He was buried at the American Cemetery in Suresness, Seine, France.

History

On Memorial Day 1919, group of returned soldier boys got together and organized the Harley Salzman Post of The American Legion at Beach. They assumed that the number to be assigned for this post would be 3 because, as far as they knew, their post was the third one of this new organization in North Dakota, Bismarck being the first and Fargo the second post to be formed. The post was named after the first World War I soldier from Golden Valley County to die in France.

Newspaper reports stated that had it not rained the day of the meeting, 50 members probably would have been enrolled. However, the storm drove home a number of soldier boys who lived in the country, but 22 members signed the roll that day.

Charter Members and Officers

The following officers were elected to serve until the new state organization was effected: Commander, C.I. Cook; Vice Commander, James Powers; Historian, C.L. Dawson; Financier, Jesse Hougen; Adjutant, Eddie Caldwell; Chaplain, J.A. Kitchen, and Sergeant-at-Arms, Leonard Stockwell.

As a result of this “get together,” an application for post of The American Legion, dated May 22, 1919, was forwarded to J.R. Baker, state chairman of The American Legion at Fargo, ND, requesting that the Harley Salzman Post be assigned a number as low as possible.

Records indicate that Beach was the fifth post organized but, by error, a new post at Casselton had been assigned the number 5 and Beach the number 15. This was corrected in August 1919, and Harley Salzman Post 5 became the official name, finally. There were 26 names on the application for charter and the sum of $20.80, or 80 cents dues per member, was submitted to state headquarters along with the application for charter.

C.L. “Dad” Dawson, Beach’s post historian, attended the 1st department convention at Bismarck, Oct.16-17, 1919, as an elected delegate from Post 5 and was elected as the first department commander to head the newly-established state organization of The American Legion in North Dakota. This was a historic beginning for Post 5 and served as an omen of better things to come.

Groundbreaking Activities

Records show three different significant actions taken by Post 5 in these early months: (1) A resolution was adopted to wage a campaign for proper display and respect for our flag, urging superintendents of schools and teachers to teach flag etiquette; (2) July 13, 1919, Homecoming at Beach for all soldier boys. It was rumored that Theodore Roosevelt, Jr., was coming to North Dakota, and an effort was made to have him come to Beach as speaker for this event. W.F. Cushing, publisher of The Beach Advance, was chairman of the celebration committee; and (3) Statewide Homecoming Celebration for soldier boys at Fargo July 21, 1919. The Beach Chamber of Commerce offered to pay expenses for our Legion delegates.

As in all small communities during these years, fundraising to support and promote Legion and community projects was very difficult. Also, it was a problem trying to maintain and enlarge membership but, gradually, it became a reality. In 1929, Post 5 acquired a two-story frame stucco building. This structure served many uses for both the Legion and the city—providing a post borne as well as meeting space for all sorts of functions in the community.

The names of R.A. “Stub” Noyes, Leo Tobias, Dan Cafferty, Knute Farstveet, Gerald Muggli, P.J. Edkins and Paul Wagner appear often in records of post events and were always on the active scene. These World War I Legionnaires, together with many others too numerous to mention, developed a solid foundation for Post 5.As World War II progressed, these same men planned for the days when they would welcome and encourage those veterans upon returning home to join and assume responsible positions in the post.

Everything possible was done by Post 5 to become an integral part of Beach and the Golden Valley County community.

In 1946, Post 5 bought the city hall building for $22,500. The city continued to use space for the fire department, city offices and community functions. Legion club facilities were developed in the lower level under the direction of volunteer foremen Donald “Monk” Gilman and “Bud” Miller. Walls were moved, concrete was poured and furniture was obtained to provide Legionnaires a club of their own. Practically all the work was done by volunteers.

Iron Lung Donation

It was in 1947 or early 1948 that the post secured an iron lung for the use of the community in the fight against polio. The iron lung was formally presented to Dr. C.A. Bush, a former U.S. Marine and a member of Post 5, who was widely recognized as a friend of veterans. “Doc” Busch had a policy of accepting no payment for services he rendered to active duty service personnel. He also played a significant role in providing care and treatment for all former members of the armed forces.

Youth Programs

Youth activities were encouraged. Boys were sent to American Legion Boys State through sponsorship by local groups. Baseball was a “must” activity. Participation in the Legion’s Oratorical Contest and International Music Camp were, and still are, supported by the post. Annual Memorial Day and Veterans Day observances were and still are a “way of life” in the community.

Drill Team

Post 5’s famous “XGI” Drill Team, under the able command of “Monk” Gilman, participates in parades, funerals and special occasions such as parking cars for the Home on the Range’s annual rodeo, has marched in several state Legion convention parades and is totally involved in the community. At one time, a junior XGI Drill Team was formed as an added activity of the post.

A Building of Their Own

On Jan. 13, 1953, Post 5 held a “Mortgage Burning” ceremony, emceed by Don Hathaway. As special guests, Department Commander Palmer Sougstad of Northwood and Mr. and Mrs. T.E. Hudson, local banker in Beach who not only made the loan but also donated $10,000 to Post 5, looked on as the mortgage was burned. The post finally realized the long ambition to have its own home, and the occasion marked the 35th year that the post had been organized.

The Legion building has been the scene of many special occasions. On Nov. 10, 1957, a recognition banquet honoring Earnie Schmit, the North Dakota Legion’s 39th department commander, was headed by Gov. John E. Davis, a past department commander and 10 years later, the national commander of The American Legion. The list of attendees included many department officials, other former department commanders, active statewide Legionnaires, members of the local Auxiliary unit, friends and family.

Since Golden Valley County was known statewide for its game hunting, the post decided to make its club facilities available to hunters who could not find accommodations in the area. This became a very popular move with hunters and proved a successful venture.

On Nov. 22, 1975, a special recognition night was held for North Dakota Legion Chaplain Rev. Howie Krienke and his wife Linda. A large crowd turned out, including state Legion and Auxiliary officials and their spouses. Howie served in the state Legion chaplaincy during 1975-78, then leaving Beach to serve another congregation in Minnesota.

Post 5, under the guidance of Commander Jim Steidl, decided in 1981 to undergo a $60,000 post home remodeling project, which altered the outside appearance and completely changed the inside of the building. Post 5 now has one of the finest club facilities in the state. Again, much of the work was performed by volunteers.

Grand opening was held March 12, 1982. Longtime Legionnaire Leo Tobias was presented a special award for his 65 years of continuous Legion membership by Department Commander Milton W. Kane.

On Sept. 21, 1985, Mrs. Albert “Marli” Wicka was honored by Auxiliary Unit 5 upon election as department president of North Dakota’s American Legion Auxiliary. Marli now serves as department secretary, officed in Beach. Our Auxiliary unit has been a great booster of Post 5, both in good times and bad.

Fifty different Legionnaires have served as Post 5 commander, several of them with multiple terms. The following have served their national, state, regional and district organizations.

National Adjutant: Earnie Schmit, 1967. Only 11 Legionnaires have held this office. Earnie was the eighth and is the only living past national adjutant.

National Executive Committeeman: C.L. “Dad” Dawson, 1920-21 (He also chaired the 1920-21 national by-laws committee).  Earnie Schmit, 1972-80. (Earnie has served on the national foreign relations and national security commissions and, for the past 12 years, the national convention commission. He served as aide to 1966-67 National Commander John E. Davis.

Department Commander: C.L. “Dad” Dawson, 1919-20, North Dakota’s first department commander. Earnie Schmit, 1957-58, the 39th department commander. Department Vice-Commander: Earnie Schmit, 1949-50.

Department Chaplain: Rev. Howie Krienke, 1975-78.

Department Executive Committee Member for Western Region: P.J. Edkins, 1943-46. (He also chaired the

Department National Security Committee during 1942-43.)

Department Marksmanship Committee Chair: N.G. (Nic.) Johnson, 1938-44. Due to lack of funds, Nic. bought the winners’ prizes, organized the contests, submitted his expenses and, when told there were no funds available, he would say, “no special hurry, but I’ll appreciate reimbursement if you can.”

Department Boy Scouts Director: Edward T. Wosepka, 1957-59.

Department Athletic Committee Member: Hollis Dietz, 1952-59.

Department Rehabilitation Committee Member: W.L. Ecker, 1964-71.

District 8 Commanders: Paul Wagner, 1939-40; Earnie Schmit, 1948-49; Frank Kippley, 1953-54; W.L. Eckes, 1962-63; Harold H. Lang, 1974-75, and James M. Steidl, 1988-89.

Post 5 has a proud legacy of leadership in both the North Dakota American Legion and the National American Legion. Membership was slow coming, but it grew. After WW II ended, Post 5’s strength climbed from 69 members in 1945 to its all-time high 254 members in 1954. However, a decline began with the passing of our WW I members and, in 1994, our strength is 152.

Beach Auxiliary

The request for charter of an Auxiliary to Post #5 was made May 22, 1922. There were 19 charter members. Mary Noyes, wife of Post 5 stalwart Raymond “Stub” Noyes, outlived the other charter members. The unit’s membership in recent years has been in the 165 range.

The unit has been active in most American Legion and Auxiliary programs through the years and cooperates with the post in many affairs. Members who have served above the unit level are:

District President: Mrs. Barney (Lydia) Brunsvold, 1946-48; Marian Odenbaugh Schatz, 1968-70, and Marli Wicka, 1977-79.

Department Historian: Marian Schatz, 1981-87.

Department President, 1985-86, National Executive Committeewoman, 1986-87, and Department Secretary,

1989-94, and continuing in this service, Marli Wicka.

The unit is proud to be the largest in District 8 and is equally proud of all its accomplishments!

Post 6 Grand Forks

Charter

The Treumann-Webb-Phelps Post 6 received its national organizational charter on July 21, 1919.

Namesake

 George Edward Phelps Senior was born at East Grand Forks, Minnesota on June 25, 1896.  He enlisted at Grand Forks on June 4, 1918.  He served overses from October 5, 1918 to March 13, 1919.  He was discharged at Camp Dodge, Iowa on March 31, 1919.

 In 1993 the Grand Forks Post 6 membership voted to change the name to Treumann-Webb-Phelps Post 6. William K Treumann, Frank Webb, and George Phelps Sr. were charter members of post 6 all three were post commanders.  It was felt that these three legionnaires were instrumental in forming the Post and kept it going in the early years.  They were also active in keeping it going through some difficult times attained its all time high of 1226 members in 1968.  A new Post #6 Charter, with the name change, was requested on May 13, 1996 and officially granted on the 30th day of June 1997. 

History

The North Dakota American Legion Post 6, Treumann-Webb-Phelps Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, Second District and located in Grand Forks, North Dakota.

Treumann Lykken served as Post 6 Commander in 1965-66; North Dakota Department Commander in 1975-1976; later served on the National Americanism Commission

Charter

The Treumann-Webb-Phelps Post 6 received its national organizational charter on July 21, 1919.

Grand Forks Post No. 6, of the American Legion was formed on July 4, 1919, in Central Park, during the “Welcome Home Day” celebration staged by the people of Grand Forks in honor of the returning veterans from World War I.  This was the same day of the year as the United States of America, 4th of July-Independence Day.

 In the meantime, the plan of The American Legion had originated at the historic caucus in Paris and had put into realization of the St. Louis Caucus.  It was the same time when many of the Grand Forks veterans had already taken steps looking to the formation of a Legion Post in Grand Forks.  It was decided that the service men homecoming celebration would furnish a fitting scene for the birth of the new veterans organization.

 The idea met with favor among the citizens and the ex-servicemen and women, so arrangements for the big festival were perfected for July 4, 1919.  More than a 1000 ex-service men attended the celebration but there were so many events and the program was so elaborate that only 100 service men could be reached and induced to help in the formation of the new post that day.

 The 100 men that could be reached met in a formal meeting to elect and install the original officers of the Grand Forks Post 6.  The first officers of the Grand Forks Post were:  Dr. Robert D. Campbell, Commander; Phillip Bangs, Adjutant; and Ray Jacobson, Finance Officer.  At the time, there was a rather nebulous understanding of the post constitution and by-laws by most of those present.  They didn’t want to take any chances on being under-organized, so three vice commanders, one from each branch of services, were elected.  The three vice-commanders named at the meeting were:  Walter Schlosser, representing the Army; James Malone, the Navy; and Clarence Sullivan, the Marines.

 Dues for membership were set at $1 but were increased to $3 by Dec. 9, 1919.  Judge Bangs submitted the Charter Application on July 10,1919 on behalf of the membership to the North Dakota State American Legion chairman, J. R. Baker.  The Charter was officially granted at the State Legion meeting at Fargo July 21, 1919. Members listed were:  John G. Brundin, Edward O. Trepanier, Julius F. Bacan, John A. Shaw, Lawrence R. Feetham, W. K. Treumann, Burton E. Thompson, H. H. Healy, R. H. Secord, W. J. Malone, and Oscar C. Nygaard.   In addition, the officers named at the first meeting were also listed, except Schlosser and Sullivan.

 Post membership grew rapidly after the appointment of R. H. Secord as membership chairman.  By 1928 the post had grown to a membership of 288 members and had become a extremely active veterans organization.  The Legion met regularly, sometimes at the Elks Lodge and Commercial Clubroom, City Hall or City Auditorium.  The formal Legion post meeting quarters was in the Veterans Memorial Clubrooms in the Grand Forks County Courthouse basement.   The clubrooms were dedicated May 25, 1936 to the remembrance of the men who lost their lives in World War I and as an inspiration for service for the community, state and nation.

 In the spring of 1937, Post 6 Commander C. D. Locklin initiated an action to form an International War Veterans Alliance with Canada.  He wrote to Col. Ralph Webb of the Canadian Legion suggesting that an international gathering be held in Grand Forks to include a joint memorial ceremony.  Col. Webb endorsed the proposal and made plans that led to over 700 Canadians traveling to Grand Forks to attend the First International Assembly held on September 6 & 7, 1937.   The Assembly Meeting led to the formation of the International Alliance between the Grand Forks Post 6 and Canada.

 At the end of World War II, hundreds of veterans returned home.  Post membership increased to 795 in 1946.  The younger veterans provided increased vitality to carry out Post programs and activities in the community.  In 1960, Post Commander Frank Kosanda presented a New Club proposal for Post 6 membership.  A Veterans Fall Roundup was held and attended by the National Vice Commander Willard Brandt, Department Commander William Gust, Department Adjutant Jack Williams and many other Department officers along with 200 Legionnaires.

 The Grand Forks Legion Club was incorporated on August 15, 1963.  The original board members were Kosanda, president; Clarence Jeffrey, vice president; Edward Sabin, secretary; Robert Griffith, treasurer; and H. G. Ruemmele.  In August 1967 a new building was purchased at 10 North 3rd Street.  A Grand Opening was held on February 12-17, 1968.  After seven years as president of the Legion Club Board, Kosanda stepped down; he was followed by Treumann Lykken, John Lyons, Earl Kiley, and James Mantos, as Club presidents, respectively.

Early Programs and Community Activities

 In 1960, a program was begun between Post 6 and Branch 141 of the Canadian Legion in which American Civil Air Patrol Cadets and Canadian Air Cadets were shown Air Base Training Facilities in both countries.   The Legion Club’s meeting room was used to house the Legion’s Blood Donor Program.  Various scholarships were provided by the Post to participate and assist the Legion’s “Need a Lift Program”.   Post 6 participated annually in the ROTC Ceremony at the University of North Dakota. 

     Post 6 regularly sponsored several delegates to Boys State and Girls State.  Because of the income generated by the Legion Club, the Post was able to contribute thousands of dollars to worthy charities including:  Blind Children’s Fund, St. Anne’s Guest Home, Listen Center, and the Valley Memorial Home.  Post 6 started an American Legion baseball program in 1928. 

Another Post 6 legionnaire who had exemplary service was Frank J. Kosanda (died on May 20th, 2009).  He was involved in a number of community service organizations, most notably the American Legion.  He served in every office of the Grand Forks Post 6.  He also served as District mmander and Department Commander for North Dakota.  Judge Kosanda served the American Legion on the national level as a member of the National Executive Committee and other capacities.

Grand Forks Legion Auxiliary

As the new decade began in the 1920’s, the American Legion Auxiliary was formed.  The Auxiliary began the task of providing dinner on meeting nights that helped the attendance.  They always participated in the Veterans Day and Memorial Day programs and prepare the lunch that follows.  In addition, the Auxiliary coordinates the Annual Poppy Day Program; present the All American Student Award at Red River and Central High School; assist with the Legion Baseball Program; raises funds to sponsor the Girls State program; and selects and send local students to the International Music Cam

Roster of Grand Forks American Legion Auxiliary Presidents

In 1993 the Grand Forks Post 6 membership voted to change the name to Treumann-Webb-Phelps Post 6. William K Treumann, Frank Webb, and George Phelps Sr. were charter members of post 6 all three were post commanders.  It was felt that these three legionnaires were instrumental in forming the Post and kept it going in the early years.  They were also active in keeping it going through some difficult times attained its all time high of 1226 members in 1968.  A new Post #6 Charter, with the name change, was requested on May 13, 1996 and officially granted on the 30th day of June 1997. 

The 1997 Grand Forks Flood

 The Red River Flood of 1997 was a major flood that occurred in April and May 1997, along the Red River in Grand Forks City and Region.  It was the most severe flood of the river since 1826.  The water from the river spread over a large area of Grand Forks, North Dakota and East Grand Forks, Minnesota. Sixty thousand people were out of their homes, and the downtown was burning.

The American Legion Post 6, home base had been located in the basement of the Grand Forks County Courthouse in the downtown area.  Post 6 lost their meeting place due to the flood along with its historical photo gallery of Post Commanders as well as its historical records from 1921-97.  After the Grand Forks County office building and the courthouse were flooded, officials temporarily moved the county seat to Larimore, North Dakota.  Government offices were set up in the Masonic Temple downtown Grand Forks.

 A new Grand Forks County Social Service building was built on South Fourth Street in 1998-1999 across the street from the Courthouse. Upon completion of the building, Post 6 established its new meeting place on the sixth floor of the new Grand Forks County Office building.  Legion members that lost their homes and possessions due to the flood received assistance from the American Legion National Emergency Assistance Program.

Hosts State Legion Conventions

 Grand Forks Post 6 and Auxiliary Unit hosted the 78th and 86th North Dakota Department Conventions.  The 78th North Dakota Department Convention as held in Grand Forks in June 14-17, 1996.  The Post 6 legion commander Kenneth Smith and Karen Braaten, convention chairperson welcomed North Dakota legionnaires to Grand Forks.

Distinguished guests included the National Commander Dan Ludwig from Red Wing, Minnesota, and Past National Commander H.F. “Sparky” Gierke, from Washington, D.C., formerly from Bismarck, N.D.  The N.D. Department Auxiliary President Lualice Stockert was the distinguished guest at the Legion Auxiliary program.

The 86th N.D. American Legion Convention was held in Grand Forks on June 25-27, 2004. The legionnaires from 228 N.D. Posts were welcomed to Grand Forks by the Treumann-Webb-Phelps Post #6 Commander, John E Stiles and Auxiliary President, Diane Kraemer. Distinguished guests at the joint (legion and auxiliary) opening session were Senator Byron Dorgan and Past National Commander Sparky Gierke.  Department Commander Jeff Hall and Auxiliary President Kathy Daniels served as hosts at the distinguished Guests Reception with Col. Mark Ramsay of the Grand Forks Air Force Base, being the keynote speaker. 

Community Involvement

The Treumann-Webb-Phelps Post 6 and Auxiliary Unit is a family oriented organization, having numerous programs to support the veteran, their spouse, and children of the Community, State, and Nation.  The Post Family supports service to veterans, children & youth programs, Americanism, legion baseball, Boys and Girl State, high school oratorical contest and other scholarships, teaching U.S. Flag etiquette in schools.  Visitations are made to hospitalized veterans on a regular basis. The Post supports the National Emergency Fund Assistance Program to help in natural disasters.  For example, funds were raised and sent to help legionnaires who were hurricane victims in the Gulf Region.

The Grand Forks Post 6 participated in 911 Remembrance Ceremony on September 11, 2001, by awarding the 2000 North Dakota American Legion Firefighter of the Year Award to Tech. Sgt. Richard A Lien Jr., Assistant Fire Chief for Fire Prevention at the Grand Forks Air Force Base Fire Department.   A community support award was presented on September 24, 2002 by Grand Forks Post 6 Commander, John Stiles to Michael Ferguson of the Grand Forks Police Department for the Ray Atol North Dakota Law Enforcement Officer of the Year Award.  Ferguson received the award for his dedication to duty, his professionalism, high performance standards and leadership ability. A second Atol Law Enforcement Officer of the Year was presented to Derik Zimmel from the Grand Forks Police Dept. in August 2007.

The Treumann-Webb-Phelps Post 6 has been recognized by the American Legion’s National Commission on Children and Youth in the following community service categories:

Oratorical Contest

 The American Legion’s Oratorical Contest is sponsored annually by Post 6 Auxiliary Unit. The purpose of the High School Oratorical Contest is to develop a deeper knowledge and appreciation of the Constitution of the United States on the part of High School Students.  Other objectives are those of leadership, the ability to speak clearly and intelligently on the rights and privileges of American Citizenship. 

 The Grand Fork Post 6 has participates annually and many have done well reaching the local, district, State, regional, or national levels.  The Post has had four high school students that have won 1st Place in the State of North Dakota competition.  They are:

1949—John Reilly

1976 Becky Omdahl

2007 Rebecca Shelton

2011 David Shelton.

North Dakota Boys State

 Support of North Dakota Boys State and North Dakota Girls State have been important parts of the youth programs at Grand Forks American Legion Post #6 since these programs were founded.  North Dakota Boys State began in 1938, while North Dakota Girls State began in 1948 under the special direction of the Department of North Dakota American Legion Auxiliary.  Excepting only the World War II related years of 1943, 1944, 1945 and the following year 1946 when North Dakota Boys State sessions were not held, Post 6 has annually sponsored groups of Grand Forks high school juniors to attend North Dakota Boys State.  Governors of North Dakota Boys State were elected from Grand Forks in 1940, George Swendiman; 1949, Stuart McDonald; 1950, Dickinson Smith; 1966, J. Casey Ryan; 1979, Tom Hackenberg; 1980, Mike Mohn; 1986, Adil Husain; and in 1997, Dan Webber.  Post #6 is proud of all these former Governors of North Dakota Boys State.  We are also proud of the several hundred other Grand Forks boys who have participated in North Dakota Boys State sessions over these many years since 1938.

 More than 29,000 young men have graduated from North Dakota Boys State and many have gone to become leaders and role models in their communities.  For example, John Hoeven from Minot was elected North Dakota Boys State Governor in 1974.  In 2000 he was first elected to a four-year term as Governor of the State of North Dakota.  In 2004 and in 2008 he was re-elected to two additional four-year terms as North Dakota’s Governor.  In 2010, during his third term as Governor, he decided to run as a candidate for election to the Congress of the United States as United States Senator for North Dakota as successor to then retiring Senator, Byron Dorgan.  Governor Hoeven won that election to be sworn in as Senator John Hoeven in January 2011 where he is now serving a six-year term.

Legion Baseball

 American Legion baseball league was founded in 1925 and since then has become a national institution that has thrived through a World War, several national tragedies, Grand Forks Flood of 1997, and times of great prosperity as well as great despair at the National and State levels.  Grand Forks started their Legion Baseball program three years after the National Program had been founded.  The Post 6 American Legion started in 1928.  The team was made up of boys of the community and formed from four sections of the city.  Coaches for each section selected players to represent Grand Forks in state competition.  Through good organization and excellent players the program experienced early success at the state, regional and national levels.

 Post 6 hosted two national Legion Baseball tournaments in 1938.  The first was a four-state regional and the second a 14-state Western Sectional.  Grand Forks American Legion program has won ten North Dakota State Championships.  The first five State Legion Championships—1934, 1936, 1937, 1938 and 1939 – were before World War II.  Since World War II, they won five more State titles—1959, 1967, 1968, 1972, and 1999.   In 1996 and 1997, the Grand Forks Royals came up just short of a State Championship.  Both years the team finished second at the State level.  But in 1999, the Royal took advantage of the opportunity with then coach Brent Polum to win the first state championship since 1972. 

There have been many individuals who have devoted much time at commitment to the success of the Post 6 Grand Forks American Legion Program through the years.  Three individuals prominent in the Legion Baseball history in Grand Forks have been inducted into the North Dakota American Legion Hall of Fame:

     Merland W. (Red) Berg—inducted in 1981 this 30-year plus worker in the athletic program of American Legion Post 6 at Grand Forks.  Berg served as team manager for 25 years and as part-time coach for several years.  His teams won state championships in 1959, 1967, 1968, and 1972.  The 1967 team went on to win the Regional title and its first game in the Legion World Series of that year, placing 5th in the nation.  This the highest standing ever achieved by a North Dakota Legion team.

     Marv Shaar—inducted in 1982 served 11-years as coach for Post 6 compiling a 356-128 record, three state titles, and the Region 6 championship.

     Ken Hunt—inducted in 1987—former major leaguer who played on the Grand Forks Post #6 Legion teams in 1949-51.

Summary

 The Treumann- Webb- Phelps American Legion Post 6 celebrated its ninety-second birthday on March 15, 2011.  The Post is proud of its rich history and continues to serve the traditional values upon which it was founded in 1928.  It has taught young men and women the importance of good sportsmanship, good health and active citizenship by providing opportunities for youth to participate in oratorical contests, Boys and Girls State, Boy Scouts, International Music Camp, Legion Baseball and other programs beneficial to children of veterans.

Post Commanders and Adjutants for the Treumann-Webb-Phelps American Legion Post #6, Grand Forks North Dakota

Year           Name of Commander                                Name of Adjutant    

1919           Dr. R. D. Campbell, President                    Philip R. Bangs, Sec.

1919-20    L. L. Eckman                                                     Philip R. Bangs

1920-21    H. J. Lowe                                                           Joe Rabinovich

1921-22    Walter Schlosser                                             Joe Rabinovich

1922-23     C. D. Page                                                  Ray Jacobson

1923-24    O Tudor Owen                                                 Alan M. Nash

1924-25    Grover Bogenrief                                            Harold Barnes

1925-26    W. K. Truemann                                              H. L. Barnes

1926-27    Frank Webb                                                      Allen Nash

1927-28    W. B. Arnold                                                      Howard George              

Post 7 Lisbon

Florence Kimball Post

Namesake

A rousing meeting of all county servicemen was held July 2 1919, at which time there was an unanimous vote to name the post after Miss Florence Kimball, a Red Cross nurse from Lisbon who, along with many other “troops,” made the supreme sacrifice while serving our country overseas.  Florence was 24 years of age at the time of her death, a few days before Armistice Day, Nov. 11, 1918. As the result of their wartime activities, 296 nurses, Florence being one of them, lost their lives.

The Florence Kimball Post 7 received its national organizational charter on July 21, 1919.

When World War I was won and the boys started to come home from their victorious pilgrimage to France, Lisbon was one of the first communities in the state to organize an American Legion post. On Memorial Day, May 30, 1919, a temporary organization known as the Ransom County Post, American Legion was formed and, on June 18, the following temporary officers were chosen: Post Commander, J.B. Jones; Secretary, W.M. Jones, Jr.

A rousing meeting of all county servicemen was held July 2, at which time there was an unanimous vote to name the post after Miss Florence Kimball, a Red Cross nurse from Lisbon who, along with many other “troops,” made the supreme sacrifice while serving our country overseas. Florence was 24 years of age at the time of her death, a few days before Armistice Day, Nov. 11, 1918.

History

Charter Members and Officers

Officers elected were: Commander, J.B. Jones; Vice-Commander, C.S. Moore; Adjutant, William M. Jones, Jr.; Finance Officer, C.A. Butler. A permanent organization was formed Dec. 3, I919, and the following officers were chosen: Commander, W.G. Curtis; Vice-Commander, M.T. Davis; Historian, T.S. Campbell; Adjutant, William M. Jones, Jr.; Finance Officer, J.E. Jones; Chaplain, D. F. Hall; Sergeant-at-Arms, T.C. Thorstenson.

After membership drives in the community, the post reached a year-end 1919 membership of 250. As the years progressed, the new American Legion post in town was the center of many public activities, of which the outstanding event was the annual Armistice Day Parade and Memorial Service at the North Bridge over the Sheyenne River and at Oakwood Cemetery.

Through the ’20s, ’30s and ’40s, membership dropped considerably as some members left the area and others passed on to the post everlasting. After World War II, the membership grew to a high of 225 in I977. The home of Florence Kimball Post 7 became the center of many activities, such as wedding dances, anniversary and birthday parties, smokers and other events. Profits from the bar were used to support Boys State, Girls State, youth activities and other programs.

In later years, the post encountered ups and downs with charitable gaming to finance its programs and the Florence Kimball Scholarship Fund, which the post had established to provide scholarships to local students. The cost of operation and slow traffic forced us out of gaming several years ago.

Through the leadership of post officers and committees, we will continue our annual “Fund Raiser” raffle. We also will have fireworks sales, silent auctions, concessions at the Lisbon School and other income-producing projects to fund our programs.

Declining membership and income resulted in the sale of our long-time post home, which was located on the south edge Lisbon. The post now rents a portion of the Masonic building, where equipment is stored and post meetings are held.

Remaining active in American Legion baseball and most other Legion programs, Post 7 also continues its participation with local veterans’ organizations in Memorial Day observances at North Bridge over the Sheyenne River and at Oakwood Cemetery on the North Hill.

Roster of Post 7 Commanders

Post YearPost Commander
1919J.B. Jones
1919-23W.G. Curtis
1923-24J.E. Jones
1924-25Dr. T.C. Patterson
1925-26Grattan L. Rourke
1926-27Foster Smith
1927-28T.S. Campbell
1928-29G.H. Haunes
1929-30R.W. Klingbeil
1930-31Clarence Gotschall
1931-32S.A. Daniels
1932-33William M. Jones
1933-34H.L. Wells
1934-35H.S. Madsen
1935-36Minard A. Halverson
1936-37Clifton Smith
1937-38Fred Hanna
1938-40John Magill
1940-41H.J. McGuckin
1941-42William H. Sullivan
1942-43Frank Schneider
1943-44Albert F. Bohlken
1944-45Asa C. Brainard
1945-46Henry C. Fricke
1946-47Jerome D. Berlin
1947-48H. E. Blakely
1948-49Fred D. Brunton, Jr.
1949-50Gene Gauche
1950-51Henry L. Mahrer
1951-52Don Holand
1952-53Clarence Berlin
1953-54Steve Kvien
1954-55Harold Fahlsing
1955-56Elmer L. Nelson
1956-57Gerald A. Thomte
1957-58Henry Smith
1958-59William A. Cole
1959-61Joseph Weisgram
1961-62Charles V. Boatman
1962-63Steve Kvien
1963-64M.H. Olafson
1964-65William H. Sullivan, Jr.
1965-66E.M. Zirnhelt
1966-67Lloyd Dale
1967-68Joseph Haecherl
1968-69Raymond Zirnhelt
1969-70Mike Fahey
1970-71Bob Recker
1971-72Vernon Lemieux
1972-73Jerry Humphrey
1973-75Maynard Aardahl
1975-77Robert C. Bohlken
1977-78Glenn Lere
1978-79Robert Silvernail
1979-80Steve Truesdell
1980-81Robert Silvernail
1981-86Joseph Haecherl
1986-87 (Part)Walt Kalbus
1986-87 (Part)Joseph Haecherl
1987-88Donald Lloyd
1988-92Robert Silvernail
1992-94Donald Lloyd

Post 8 Mayville

Namesake

The post was named in honor of Leon N. Moshier, who was born Aug. 8, 1896, at Mayville. Upon joining the Army in May of 1917, he was commissioned a second lieutenant and was ordered to France, where he was cited for gallantry in action and was awarded the Silver Star. He died July 20, 1918, of wounds received at the battle of Aisne-Marne. His remains were returned to Mayville for burial. Interestingly, Post 8 was chartered on the one-year anniversary of Moshier’s death.

History

Charter

The Leon M. Moshier Post 8 received its national organizational charter on July 21, 1919.

In early June 1919, Carl R. Nordtvedt and Benjamin H. Linn interviewed many of the ex-servicemen of the Mayville community and explained to them the plan for an ex-servicemen’s organization. On June 16, 1919, a meeting was held and a committee was elected to draw up a constitution and set of by-laws.

By Sunday, July 20, 1919, there were 15 members signed up. They met, adopted the constitution and by-laws and made application to J .R. Baker, state chairman of The American Legion, for a charter for the Leon N. Moshier Post.

Charter Members and Officers

The first offficers were: Commander – Benjamin H. Linn, Adjutant – Joseph Kjos, and Finance Officer – Dr. G. S. Frogner.

Linn was elected but actually never served as commander. AI Stomner then was selected to be the first active commander and became involved in many other post officer positions throughout his life. Henry Kjos served the post in numerous capacities during its early years.

Membership

Membership in the post peaked in its third year of existence, with an all-time high membership of 130 in 1921. Membership has floated between 87 and 112 since the late 1970s. The post regularly meets in the clubrooms of the VFW group in downtown Mayville because the post does not have a home of its own. Meetings are generally well attended, with meetings usually held on Saturday mornings. Fifty-year member T.L. Christianson serves as long-time post commander.

Post Programs

The post has been active in promoting Memorial Day by sponsoring a parade and program at the Mayville Cemetery, where the graves of all veterans are decorated for that day’s events. The post also promotes many American Legion programs including Legion baseball, Boys State and other youth activities at the Mayville public school. Long-time Post 8 member Ed Nesheim was in the first class of boys attending Boys State in 1938.

Most recently, the post helped to sponsor the acquisition, placement and dedication of an F-84-F Thunderstreak airplane as a memorial honoring all veterans. The plane is located along Highway 200 in Mayville. Legionnaire Courtlan Hanson of Mayville spearheaded the committee to secure the plane and see the project to completion.

Post 9 Ray, ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 9, William E. Smith Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Ninth District and located in Ray, North Dakota.

Namesake

William Emery Smith was born in Taneville, Missouri on October 13, 1894.  He was inducted at Williston, North Dakota on November 26, 1917.  He served with Company G., 328th Infantry in France at Meuse-Argonne and St. Michael.  He was Killed in Action on October 16, 1918 and was buried at the American Cemetery in France.

Charter

The William E. Smith Post 9 received its national organizational charter on July 21, 1919.

Post 10 Buffalo, ND

Namesake

 Initially Post 10 was named the Buffalo Post 10, and received its national organizational charter on July 26, 1919. Post 10 has operated under three different names during its lifespan. Shortly thereafter, per wishes of the members, an application was submitted to change the post’s name to Walter N. Donaldson Post 10.  Walter Norman Donaldson was born in Sugar Creek, Wisconsin on January 20, 1892.  He was inducted at Fargo, North Dakota on June 15, 1918. He died of pneumonia at Fort Riley, Kansas on October 23, 1918 while in WW I Army service and is buried at Big Bend, Wisconsin.  Members decided to re-name this post Easton-Yanish Post 10 in honor of James L. Easton and Lawrence A. Yanish, both killed during WW II.  James L. Easton was born in Buffalo, North Dakota on November 10, 1919.  He entered the Army on June 27, 1940 and died in service on September 11, 1942.   Lawrence Yanish was born in Oriska, North Dakota on February 16, 1928.  He entered the U.S. Navy at Farragut, Idaho on August 26, 1943 and served in the Asiatic Pacific Theatre.  He was listed as Killed in Action on April 13, 1945 near Shoto Japan.  His remains were not recovered.

History

Charter

The North Dakota American Legion Post 10, Easton-Yanish Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, First District and located in the Buffalo, North Dakota.

The Easton-Yarnish Post 10, initially the Buffalo Post 10, received its national organizational charter on July 26, 1919.

Post 10 has operated under three different names during its lifespan. On July 19, 1919, the l0th American Legion post in the state of North Dakota was born – receiving its national organizational charter as the Buffalo Post 10 on July 26, 1919. Shortly thereafter, per wishes of the members, an application was submitted to change the post’s name to Walter N. Donaldson Post 10. He died of pneumonia while in WW I Army service.

Charter Members and Officers

The following 19 signatures appear on the application for charter: J. U. Pavlik, W.S. McCarthy, Carl J. Larsen, Stephen S. Young, Myron Swenson, Gustave E. Andersen, Edward W. Westergaard, William Cutler Roosa, Andrew E. Ness, John E. Bowe, Ed H. Satter, Clarence L. Christensen, Peter C. Westergaard, Arthur S. Berg, Dwight R. Sproul, Evan S. Brown, Glenn L. Smith, Louis H. Syverud and D.C. McCarthy.

Due to inability to maintain the minimum required membership, the post discontinued operations in 1933. When many veterans returned home after WW II, Post 10 was reorganized and was issued its present charter Jan. 2, 1946, by national headquarters.

Easton-Yanish Post

Members decided to name this post Easton-Yanish Post 10 in honor of James L. Easton and Lawrence A. Yanish, both killed during WW II. Although not included in the post name, Alvin P. Anderson also was a casualty of WW II from our area. Legion Auxiliary Unit #10 has recognized Mrs. Lewis Easton, Mrs. Eva Yanish and Mrs. John Anderson as Gold Star Mothers.

Second Charter Members and Officers

Charter members were O.A. Kristianson, Clarence Johnson, LeRoy R. Peterson, Gordon M. Petersen, Owen J. Killoran, Orey J. Hansen, Andrew D. Miller, 0. H. Johnson, Albert W. Whited, E. W. Ross, Paul M. McCann, George E. Grieve, Robert J. Yanish, Ernest Lakey, James M. Lakey, Arnold N. Kaim, Ralph J. Grieve, Dale E. Nudell, Ellis J. Clancy, Frank D. Butler, John U. Pavlik, D. R. Sproul, John T. Backes, Clarence H. Beilke, Edward G. Masterson, Frank E. Knutson, Alfred F. Bullock, Jack Johnson, Svend Boyer, A.S. Berg, Charles C. Titus, Clair H. Boyd, Harvey Barnby and Cordon W. Coon.

John U. Pavlik served as commander in both of the post’s 1919 and 1946 charter years. He was highly instrumental in perpetuating the post. Other pillar members include Arnold “Swede” Kaim, who organized the efforts to acquire a school house and move it into Buffalo, set it on a new basement and remodel the structure into a meeting and activity center for our post; LeRoy Jager, for his energetic service in directing annual membership drives and handling administrative matters as adjutant; Rev. James Snyder, for raising the ideals, goals and objectives of Post 10, and Ray Diemert, for promoting The American Legion baseball program. Some years later, Post 10 vacated its building and transferred its activities to the new Community Hall.

Programs

There has been a steady growth in membership in our post, more than doubling its 1946 membership of 46 to all-time enrollments of 110 during the years of 1992-94, including some lady war veterans.

In addition to sponsoring projects in the community, the Post has regularly sent delegates to Boys State, funding as many as five boys in some years.

Historically, Post 10 has been a strong supporter of the Legion baseball program, which was started here in 1950. The first coach was Howard “Swede” Solheim. Other coaches’ over the years include Bob King, Ray :Diemert, Gary Gillis, Ray Haegar, Craig Sturlagson, Eldon Erickson, Mick Miller, Don Nelson, LeRoy Anderson and Don Nash.

A major event in the Buffalo community each year is the Memorial Day program presented by Post 10, with our Auxiliary ladies serving the dinner after the program. Ceremonies are held at the peony-filled Buffalo Cemetery and the Tower City Cemetery, followed by the 11:00 a.m. program at the Community Hall. Included in the program are reports from Boys State and Girls State delegates. Since 1959, reading the roll call of deceased veterans at the service has become a tradition. Our post also distinguishes vet gravesites with markers.

Medal of Honor Recipient

Our Legion post provides honor guard and firing squad ceremonies at funerals for veterans and participates in community parades. This group was privileged to render military rites for Congressional Medal of Honor recipient Cpl. Arthur 0. Beyer, a long-time resident, he died in February 1965. Born in Iowa, Beyer was presented the Medal of Honor by President Harry S. Truman in August 1945 for conspicuous gallantry in action Jan. 15, 1945, in Belguim. Against powerful German forces, he destroyed two machine gun positions, killed eight of the enemy and captured 18 prisoners, including two bazooka teams.

Post Auxiliary

American Legion Auxiliary Unit 10 operated at Buffalo for about 10 years after WW I, then disbanded and reorganized in 1947. When the Fargo VA Hospital was dedicated June 29, 1929, Unit 10 sent representatives and also brought along many comfort items for the patients. During all the years of its existence, Unit 10 has remembered hospitalized veterans in some way.

Sending a delegate to Girls State, supporting students attending International Music Camp, selling poppies, sponsoring the poppy poster contest, and helping with Legion programs and local activities are included on the Auxiliary’s annual calendar. Buffalo Legionnaires praise their Auxiliary ladies for their marvelous assistance to the post and their services to veterans, youth and the community

Roster of Post #10 Commanders

1919 temporary ……………………….. EvanS. Brown

1919-20 …………………………………… John U. Pavlik

1920-21 …………………………………………… A.S. Berg

1921-22 ……………………………………….. D.R. Sproul

1922-23 …………………………………………… A.S. Berg

1923-24 ………………………………….. T.B. Mickelson

1924-25 ……………………………………… L.H. Syverud

1925-26 …………………………………. Myron Swenson

1926-27 ……………………………… Harry Christensen

1927-28 …………………………………………. S.S. Young

1928-29 …………………………………………… A.S. Berg

1929-31 ………………………………………… Nils Nilson

1931-33 ………………………………. Clarence Johnson

1933-45 ……………………………. Post was disbanded

1945-48 …………………………………… John U. Pavlik

1948-51 …………………………….. Robert H. Kringler

1951-52 ……………………………… ; …. Bernard Genzel

1952-53 ……………………………… , ………… Clair Boyd

1953-54 ……………………………… , …….. Herbert Ward

1954-57 ……………………………………… Arnold Kaim

1957-58 …………………………………….. Harry F. Buhr

1958-59 ……………………………………… Arnold Kaim

1959-60 ……………………………… , Raynond Diemert

1960-62 ………………………………….. Donald A. Paul

1962-63 …………………………………….. Bill M. Moug

1963-65 ……………………………. Ralph W. Corcoran

1965-66 …………………………………….. J.M. Peterson

1966-67 …………………………………… LeRoy F. Jager

1967-68 …………………………….. peorge E. McCann

1968-69 …………………………….. , …….. Bill M. Moug

1969-71 …………………………………….. James Snyder

1971-7 4 …………………………….. , ……… Duane Miller

1974-77 ………………………………………. LeRoy Jager

1977-82 ……………………………………….. Gary Grieve

1982-86 ………………………………………… Ray Pfeifer

1986-91 ……………………………….. Chester Flath, Jr.

1991-94 ………………………………… Robert VonBank

POST 11 Cavalier, ND

Namesake

Lavern J. Thompson Post

Lavern J. Thompson was born at Cavalier, North Dakota on July 6, 1898.  He enlisted in Company C., 1st Infantry, North Dakota National Guard at Grafton, North Dakota on April 26, 1917.  He was called onto Federal Service on July 15, 1917.  He was Killed in Action on October 7, 1918.  He was buried in France and re-buried in Cavalier.  Among other awards and decorations, he earned the Silver Star.

The North Dakota American Legion Post 11, Lavern J. Thompson Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, Second District and located in Cavalier, North Dakota.

History

Charter

The Lavern J. Thompson Post 11 received its national organizational charter on July 26, 1919.

POST 12 Washburn, ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 12, Victor B. Wallin Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Fifth District and located in Washburn, North Dakota.

Charter

The Victor B. Wallin Post 12 received its national organizational charter on August 6, 1919.

Namesake

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is image-189.png

The American Legion post in Washburn, ND, was named after Victor B. Wallin, who was killed in France in WW I. He was the only man from Washburn who die in that war. First Lt. Victor B. Wallin was an infantry officer with Co. D, 356th Infantry Regiment of the S9th Division. Wallin went overseas June 4, 1918. He served in the Meuse Argonne, St. Mihiel and Lorraine campaigns.

Lt. Wallin had a even more tragic end to his life because he was killed by shrapnel while leading his men in a night crossing of the Meuse River only hours before the armistice was signed on Nov. 11, 1918. Wallin was killed on the day the First World War ended at commune of Pouilly, Meuse, France.

He was buried overlooking the Meuse River. The men he was leading (also killed by the shrapnel), were buried in a row at his feet. Wallin’s body was brought home and was interred in the Riverview Cemetery at Washburn a few years later.

History

Homer N. Wallin

The Wallin family of Washburn had another son who had a career in the U.S. Navy, Admiral Homer N. Wallin, a brother of Victor. Admiral Wallin was put in charge of salvage at Pearl Harbor after the Dec. 7, 1941, sneak attack. He and his men salvaged 16 of the 19 sunken ships and put them back into action against the Japanese forces. He maintained his American Legion membership in Washburn until his death.

Washburn is very proud of the Wallin brothers and of their sacrifices and contributions to our community, state and nation.

Other Washburn WW II Casualties

The other casualties from the Washburn area – all killed in action during WW II – were:

Charles R. Reiser, KIA, Saipan, June 15, 1944.

Norman C. Dutoit, KIA, Rome – Arno campaign, June 25, 1944.

G.A. “Gus” Lindell, KIA, Falaise Gap, France, Aug. 18, 1944.

Paul F. Fischer, KIA, Seine River, France, Aug. 27, 1944.

Theodore J. Nelson, KIA, near Hurtgen, Germany, Nov. 24, 1944.

Robert E. Robinson, KIA, Beeck, Germany, Dec. 1, 1944.

Keith A. Maloney, KIA, flight over Cologne, Germany, Feb. 13, 1945.

Post 12 American Legion Baseball Program

Victor B. Wallin Post 12 of Washburn has established itself over the past 40 years as a proud sponsor of American Legion baseball. Throughout North Dakota, Post 12 is recognized as one of the most competitive, well-run Class “B” programs. The Washburn Legion baseball team has been a regional and state tournament participant a number of times as well as playing in various tournaments throughout the state.

The Post 12 meeting rooms are full of trophies earned on the baseball diamond by the youth of Washburn as a part of the Legion-supported program. At various times, the Washburn team has been able to provide roster spots for players from other surrounding communities that no longer have baseball. Those towns include Wilton, Underwood and Center.

Although the boys sponsored by Post 12 have never been able to capture the state Legion title (second place finishes in 1955, 1985 and 1986), the Washburn youth can rest assured that if the baseball interest remains in the community in the years ahead, Post 12 will be there to keep the program going. Maybe the elusive state crown will be achieved!

Community Honors Veterans on Memorial Day

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is image-190.png

Since the formation of Victor B. Wallin Post12 in 1919, the Washburn American Legion has been actively involved in arranging, coordinating and conducting special Memorial Day events to honor our nation’s military veterans.

Washburn has had a long-standing love affair with Memorial Day, with the first observance of the holiday occurring in 1884. For 110 consecutive years, the community has paused to remember and honor all veterans from the area.

The 1931 program attracted about 2,000 people; in recent years, 400 to 600 have been commonplace. The location for the festivities has included a tent on Main Street, the old courthouse, the Methodist Church, the Washburn Opera House or town hall, Asbury Camp Tabernacle, Rhude Parke and presently Memorial Hall.

A typical Memorial Day observance in Washburn includes members of the Legion post and Auxiliary placing flags and crosses with poppies on graves of all veterans buried in Riverview Cemetery.

A program at Memorial Hall has an opening concert by the high school band, followed by advancement of the colors, Pledge of Allegiance and an invocation by a local clergy person. Girls State delegates present patriotic readings. Guest speakers have included state governors, legislators and other elected officials, military personnel and other personages. A roll call of deceased area veterans is read before the benediction and retirement of colors.

A parade to the cemetery follows the downtown program. The parade consists of a color guard, the school band, marching veterans, vehicles carrying special guests and other marchers such as school children, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts and flower bearers. Townspeople, and others taking part in the Memorial Day program, gather at the cemetery to decorate the graves. The cemetery program includes an invocation, tribute to the war dead, salute by the firing squad and Taps. A community picnic in Memorial Hall completes the day. The Legion post and Auxiliary provide the hamburgers and hot dogs, and potluck items are brought by others attending the affair.

Some events have changed, but the theme remains the same in Washburn: Remember the veterans; their sacrifices, senses of duty and obligations must never be forgotten.

Washburn Memorial Building

The Washburn Memorial Building was dedicated Sept. 21, 1951, to those who lost their lives in World War II. It was a dream fulfilled after many years of planning and fund raising, which included the raffle of a Plymouth automobile.

At the dedication, state Legion Commander Truman Wold of Watford City was the main speaker. Other dignitaries were Mayor R.O. Everson, Department Vice Commander Paul Bartholomew of Wilton, Post Commander Lyle Luttrell and the Rev. M. J. Sheldahl, pastor of First Lutheran Church.

Quoting from an article by Otto Vetter, “The planning and construction of the Memorial Building was perhaps the largest undertaking of The American Legion.”

After World War II, the servicemen saw the need of a new community building and spearheaded the effort. In November 1945, a committee including L.J. Johnson, Albert Wille, Cliff Beeks, Leo Wilson, Raymond Wicklander and Carl Solmonson was formed to investigate the possibility of a new building. Sometime later, the city gave The American Legion four lots on Main Street. When the Legion’s share of the construction was completed, the lots were returned to the city.

The Legion Building Committee consisted of Chairman Roy Sheldon, Howard Holtan, Hans Nelson, L. J. Johnson, Carl Solmonson and Don Nordquist, who worked with a committee appointed by the city commission.

The achitect was H.M. Leonard of Bismarck; the building contractor was Harry E. Jeffrey of Underwood. Construction of the basement was supervised by Carl Solmonson and assisted by Otto Vetter. There were many volunteers, including high school boys.

The fundraising committee was made up of Leo Pfiefle, William Arenstein and Lyle Luttrell. The first money, $3,000 was raised on Legion Day in July 1947. The building fund grew from the raffling off of an automobile, the sponsoring of a street dance, the contributing of truckloads of grain or cash from area farmers (Raymond Wicklander’s truck was used), the sponsoring of an air show, the selling of buttons to be used on Dedication Day, the giving of contributions by the Jaycees, Hancock School, Washburn School Carnival, business people, Legion and Auxiliary members as well as other interested people. A little German band traveled from town-to-town with an entourage of ticket sellers for money-raising projects.

The Legion, the City of Washburn and the McLean County Commission worked out a plan of matching a county levy authorized by the 1948 Legislature, which provided that a 4-mill levy could be levied for veterans projects. The levy and a city bond issue passed. In August of 1950, the Legion post turned the money in its building fund over to the City of Washburn. In return, the Legion has the privilege of using three rooms in the basement.

In 1956, the post was given a 99-year lease on the building. By 1955, the building committee was dissolved, and its duties were assumed by a board consisting of Chairman William Arenstein, Earl Chase, Raymond Wicklander, Leo Pfiefle and George Cunningham.

The building is 90 x 125 feet with a ceiling 30 feet high. The building is used for community activities, including basketball games. The main floor includes the auditorium with a stage, a bar, restrooms, storage rooms and four rooms at one time used by the North Dakota National Guard. The full basement includes three Legion rooms, a dining room, kitchen, Art Association room, Boy Scout room, Community room, and restroom facilities.

Fun Car Entertains Parade Audiences

Having seen a bucking fun car on television in the parade at the national Legion convention, I talked to Cliff Beeks and Roy Sheldon about making one. They thought it was a good idea and we had a very active Legion post to help carry it through. Chris Ploeger had a two-door Model T Ford sedan sitting down by my blacksmith shop that he wasn’t using. I offered him $25 and he said, “Sold!!” I then talked to Cliff Sampson, who was operating our blacksmith shop, if he could shorten the frame and drive shaft, move the rear wheels ahead, cut off the top and put a tail wheel on it. He said, “no problem,” as after harvest the blacksmith business was not too hectic.

Ervin Dockter, who was the head mechanic at our implement business, said he would work on the motor, transmission and related parts necessary to make the car operate. Cliff Beeks donated the tail wheel off a Piper Cub airplane that served the same purpose on the vehicle.

After considerable experimentation, we decided how far forward the rear wheels had to be moved in order to balance the vehicle properly. Along with a few weights and the right-sized Legionnaires in the rear seat, it worked quite well. Roy Sheldon engineered the individual brakes on the rear wheel, enabling it to spin in either direction.

We had it operating in 1955 for the Memorial Day parade and again in 1956 and for Washburn’s 75th anniversary celebration in 1957.

Ervin Dockter was the chief engineer and driver from its first parade until his death in 1983. Since that time, Tom Merkel has assumed the operation. Over the past 40 years, many Legionnaires have spent many hours working, painting and taking the funny car around to other cities for their local celebrations and parades. A few of those cities where the car has appeared are Wilton, Underwood, Turtle Lake, Minot, Hazen, Bismarck, Garrison, Mandan, Hensler, Riverdale, Beulah, Butte, Max and Washburn.

Special thanks go out to Roger Daub. If there was any part that the crew needed and couldn’t purchase, he would go home and make it in his machine shop and be back with it the next morning.

Many thanks to Terry Dworshak for all the pictures he has taken and the albums he put together!

Post 12 Top Membership Years

1989 – 178 members

1991 – 160 members

1990- 158 members

1994- 155 members

1993 – 154 members

POST 13 Finley

Charter

The North Dakota American Legion Post 13, Peterson-Olson Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, First District and located in Finley, North Dakota.

The Peterson-Olson Post 13, initially the William O. Peterson Post 13, received its national organizational charter on August 6, 1919. On September 18, 1946 the Post updated its name to the Peterson-Olson Post 13.

Namesake

William G. Peterson was born in Cobb, Wisconsin on February 18, 1890.  He was inducted on May 25, 1918.  He was Killed in Action on November 9, 1918 in France.  His remains were returned to the United States and he was interred at Finley, North Dakota. 

Orville R. Olson was born in Finley, North Dakota on July 29, 1913.  He entered the U.S. Army at Ft. Meade, South Dakota on March 27, 1941.  He served in the Asiatic Pacific Theatre and was Killed in Action on May 31, 1942 at Baatan, Philippines, the first Finley serviceman to die in WW II.  He was buried in Finley, North Dakota.

History

The American Legion at Finley was chartered August 6, 1919, under the name of William G. Peterson Post 13. Charter members were John Halverson, Ed ward Lieske, Joseph Cummings, Oscar Void, L.E. Long, Thomas Simonson, Swen Olson, A.J. Heimark, Alfred Mickelson, A.T. Drengson, Alvin Peterson, O.A. Engeness, C.M. Needham, Conrad H. Knudson and Edwatd Taylor. The post name was changed October 24, 1946, to include the name of Orville Olson who was the first of this community to lose his life in World War II. The name became Peterson-Olson Post 13.

The post at Findley has been very active through the years with its many programs and activities, also providing good support for community projects. Special programs have been presented on Memorial Day and Veterans Day, the latter of which in earlier years was known as Armistice Day. These programs have always been open to the public. The post members have taken part in many parades in neighboring towns as well as at home and also at department conventions.

Post Commanders and Noted Legionnaires

One member, Howard Stansbury, was post chaplain for 47 years, longest of any chaplain in state history. Several have served as department officers, including the following who were First District Commander: C.M. Needham during 1947-48; Thomas Simonson, 1951-52; Elmo Olson, 1955-56; Ervin Grunseth, 1961-62; Nordeen Sorlien;  1967-68, and Orlando Wigen, 1990-91. Post #13 has had two Department Commanders: Elmo Olson in 1964-65 and Nordeen Sorlien, 1979-80.

The American Legion 50th Anniversary Observation

On March 15, 1969, approximately 185 persons attended the banquet and program at the Finley School observing the 50th Anniversary of The American Legion. On that occasion Post 13 honored 17 World War I members with life membership awards and several other Legionnaires with special awards for continuous membership.

Post Home

In the fall of 1982, after several years of taking down old buildings for lumber, as well as the 1907 school in Finley, we started a long-awaited remodeling job on our Legion hall. This building is used for many community events, such as wedding dances, anniversary parties and meetings of other organizations. We added 20 feet on the south and west of the building, with a basement under the whole addition. This gave us restrooms upstairs that we did not have before and a larger entry, a larger meeting and banquet room and a whole new kitchen with oak cabinets built by a local cabinet maker. We used the maple floor from the old Finley school after we had it stripped by a shop in Hope.

We were able to store all of the lumber in the old Great Plains Lumber yard in Finley, as that firm had built a new facility on the east side of town. After the building expansion was completed, we installed air conditioning.

Total cost of the project was $95,000, using mostly donated labor. Our post had been placing savings into a building fund for years and, along with local donations, we only had to borrow $50,000 from the Citizens State Bank in Finley. After five years of serving dinners, banquets, rental income for wedding dances, bar income, etc., we were able to burn our mortgage upon making full payment on our loan.

A few years later we installed soundproofing carpet on three walls from floor to ceiling and four feet up on the fourth wall which cut the noise quite well.

We have held several district meetings which work out well; our building is now ideally suited for the men to meet in the basement and the ladies upstairs. We are proud of our building and will show it to anyone interested. After the Memorial Day program on May 25, 1992, we dedicated a monument in front of our building that reads as follows:

“This memorial is dedicated to those who served honorably and those that gave their lives for our great nation.”

The post enrolled 151 members for 1994

Auxiliary Unit Active in Finley Community

The American Legion Auxiliary at Finley, ND, was chartered June 13, 1921. There were 10 charter members: Mrs. Caroline Vadnie, Ms. Esther Vadnie, Mrs. Gertrude Still, Mrs. Ingeborg Gilbertson, Mrs. Clare Linn Larson, Mrs. Vera Wold, Mrs. Clara Mickelson, Mrs. Lucy Bjorke, Mrs. Hilda Quirk and Mrs. Ida Simon.

In the early years the unit held its meetings in homes or at the old Woodman Hall. In 1952 the unit was able to hold its Auxiliary meetings in the new Legion home, meeting the first Wednesday of every month.

In the mid-20’s Clare Linn Larson began participating in department activities, serving as committee chairperson and Department Vice-President. She was elected Department President and served the North Dakota American Legion Auxiliary in that office during 1926-27. She continued serving her unit actively until she moved to Wisconsin in the 1960’s.

In 1948 the name of the Auxiliary unit was changed to Peterson-Olson Unit #13, following the same name change made by the post. Beginning with the 10 charter members starting the organization in 1921, the unit has grown to a membership of 150 members in 1994. Many of those who joined after World War II still take an active part in all of the Auxiliary’s programs: Americanism, Girls State, Veterans Affairs and Rehabilitation, Poppy and Community Service.

The members work hard at raising money and donate to school and community needs as well as serving our veterans. All of these activities make for a strong American Legion Auxiliary unit.

POST 14 Jamestown

The North Dakota American Legion Post 14, Ernest DeNault Robertson Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Fourth District and located Jamestown, North Dakota.

Charter

The Ernest DeNault Robertson Post 14 received its national organizational charter on August 8, 1919

Namesake

The group decided to name the post after Ernest DeNault Robertson, who was the first Stutsman County boy to make the supreme sacrifice in World War I. He was killed in action June 14, 1918, in the battle of Belleau Wood and was awarded the French Croix de Guerre with Silver Star.

History

The initial meeting of the “vets” who were desirous of organizing a local post of The American Legion met in the Jamestown Armory June 19, 1919. James D. Gray served as acting chairman. It was unanimously decided that Jamestown should have a Legion post, and the meeting then centered on organizational matters including the election of officers, selection of a name for the post and extending invitations to ex-servicemen throughout the county to become charter members.

The slate of officers elected were Gray, commander; Arthur L. Knauf, vice-commander; Fred W. Kellogg, adjutant; Frank W. Newberry, finance officer; George F. Blewett, historian; W. W. Landis, chaplain, and M. E. Tweed, sergeant-at-arms.

Early Membership

By July 31, 1919, a total of 134 veterans had signed as charter members. The application for a post charter was forwarded that date to department headquarters, where No. 14 was assigned for this new post. By spring of 1920, Post 14’s effective membership campaign surpassed the 500-mark.

In January of 1920, the Ladies Auxiliary to Post 14 was organized under the leadership of Mrs. Kate Blewett, chair, and Rachael Seiler, secretary. The kickoff meeting had the enthusiastic participation of 78 members.

The Company “H” North Dakota National Guard Armory was built in Jamestown and dedicated on Dec. 16, 1912. Some of the now deceased American Legion members, who were residents of the community when the Armory was constructed and subsequently served in World War I, contributed to Armory costs of $26,773.10.

Many of The American Legion’s meetings and activities were held in the Community Hall, located above the Orlady Store (now King’s Studio). Post 14 clubrooms were located for many years above Halverson’s Cafe, at corner of 2nd Avenue and 2nd Street.

Drum and Bugle Corps

The American Legion Post 14 Drum and Bugle Corps was organized in January 1929, under the management of Dr. L. E. Musburger. The unit had 22 members and placed fourth in musical events at the 1929 department convention at Minot.

Memorial Park

Post #14 established The American Legion Memorial Park at Spiritwood Lake and built the Chautauqua Auditorium on the west side of that park. On Feb. 11, 1954, the Stutsman County Commissioners granted a 99-year lease to Ernest DeNault Robertson Post 14 in the new Veterans Memorial Building. O.W. Fode, a past commander, served as Post 14 chairman in negotiating the lease. Fode was also a county commissioner at that time. E. A. Moline was the general contractor.

The Grand Opening was held Aug. 26-28, 1955, with events chaired by Harry Degenstein. The building was dedicated to “People Who Gave Service and to Those Who Lost Their Lives in World War I, World War II and Korean Conflict.” The structure is a combined community building and Legion home. Working with the Stutsman County Commissioners, Post 14 agreed to provide $32,000 toward the building cost in exchange for the lease of the basement level to use for its clubrooms.

On April 26, 1972, Post 14 donated $100,000 towards construction of the lobby for the new Civic Center and designated it in Memory of All Stutsman County War Veterans!

Bicentennial Project

One of the first major Bicentennial projects in the state and likely in the nation is this giant memorial eagle that graces the north, previously bare, facade of the Jamestown Veterans Memorial Building. Ernest D. Robertson Post No. 14 Legionnaires planned and arranged for construction and the October 1974 installation a giant (25×17-foot) metal plaque weighing some 2,500 pounds. The commemorative work was designed to convey the joy of celebration — the culmination of 200 Fourth of July events — and other patriotic reflections.

Programs

Over the last 75 years, Post 14 has been an active contributor to many youth programs, including baseball teams.

Voiture Locale #688 Forty and Eight

Organized on April 26, 1924, Voiture Locale 688 of the Forty and Eight at Jamestown has been closely associated with Ernest DeNault Robertson Post 14 for seven decades in serving the community. Voiture 688 is not only a fun organization but also a working arm of The American Legion in Jamestown.

L.W. Upshaw was chosen as the first chef de gare to head Voiture 688, and R.M. DePuy was selected as Correspondant to handle the secretarial duties. Some of the other charter voyageurs, who assisted in establishing the voiture, were J. W. Plunkett, Dr. T. L. DePuy, Arthur Johnson, Perry Johnson, F.W. Newberry, Peter Zappas, L. F. Henry, Alex Steinbach, John D. Garr and Gene Dresser. The 40 Hommes et 8 Chevaux Jamestown Locale’s history and by-laws were adopted.

Jamestown’s Voyageurs, through the efforts of long-time Correspondant Harold Braniff, present small 3-1/2″x6″ (Made in USA) American Flags to first graders in citywide schools each year. They also contribute to their Nurses Training program as well as to the National Carville Star program.

POST 15 Casselton

Namesake

Jay Rugg was born in Cass County, North Dakota on February 15, 1895.  He enlisted in Company K, 1st Infantry, North Dakota National Guard on July 10, 1917.  He served overseas from December 15, 1917 until he was Killed in Action on June 19, 1918 in France.  He is buried at the American Cemetery in Bony, Aisne France.  Carl Joakim Heille was born on March 14, 1892 in Bluffington, Minnesota.  He served in the Minnesota National Guard and was Killed in Action on October26, 1918.  He is buried in the American Cemetery in France.

History

The North Dakota American Legion Post 15, Rugg-Heille Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, First District and located in Casselton, North Dakota.

Charter

The Rugg-Heille Post 15 received its national organizational charter on July 21, 1919.

Post 16 Aneta ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 16, Edward A. Broberg Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, Second District and located in the Aneta, North Dakota.

Charter

The Edward A. Broberg Post 16 received its national organizational charter on August 6, 1919.

Namesake

Edward Anton Broberg was born in Grand Forks, North Dakota on November 22, 1890.  He was inducted into the Army at Williston on March 29, 1918.  He served overseas from May 27, 1918 until he was Killed in Action in France on Sept. 30, 1918.  He is buried at the American Cemetery Meuse-Argonne France.

History

Charter Officers

Edwin Lowen was elected as the post’s first commander and John Gronley its initial adjutant. Charter members were John Gronley, Theodore Krogen, Andrew Lantz, C. G. Strom, Oscar Carlson, Garl Broberg, Olaf Broberg, Ed Lowen, David Palmer, Edward Field, Carl Thingstad, Ralph Bailey, Henry Ulvick, John Clark and Carl Engelstad.

First Military Funeral in Aneta

The first known military funeral in Aneta was for George Thomas, May 15, 1927. Mounted Legionnaire horsemen lead the cortege to the cemetery for graveside services. Participating Legionnaires were Helmer Brekke, Dick Smith, Charles Hillesland, Gust Locken, Henry Almass, Olaf Broberg, Carl Thingstad, Oscar Holte, Carl Engelstad, John Clark, Carl Gjaastjon, Hjalmer Thompson, Ed Field, Henry Vangness, Art Vig, Oscar Jenson, and Line Hanson.

Conservation Program

Post 16 gave enthusiastic cooperation to the department Conservation committee in the mid-1930s and recommended suitable places in the Aneta-Kloten area for building dams to conserve water. T.O. Homme served as our post’s conservation chairman. Aneta was among 20 posts statewide to receive a special citation in 1935 for being intensely active throughout the year and for taking up each item on the department Conservation committee program.

Other Programs

Post 16 conducts military funerals upon request of the family. Over the years Aneta Legionnaires have held fundraising projects such as farming the fairgrounds, raffles of turkeys, cars, TVs, snow cats, camping trailers, etc.  Proceeds have been used to finance summer baseball teams, delegates to Boys State, school donations of $250 to high school classes and a wide variety of other worthy activities in the community. The Legion is often asked for a helping hand in many different ways and can always be counted upon for assistance.

Post Home

Post 16 burned its mortgage in 1949. The Legion building was purchased in 1947, and many improvements were made in later years. After the post office moved out, the upstairs was converted for use by the Auxiliary and the kitchen was furnished with appliances and carpeting.

Membership

The post enrolled an all-time high membership of 77 in 1948. Our 1994 membership was 44.

Post 17 Sykeston ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 17, Bourke-Hollingsworth Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Fourth District and located in Sykeston, North Dakota.

Charter

The Bourke-Hollingsworth Post 17, received its national organizational charter on August 6, 1919. The Post disbanded and its charter was cancelled on June 15, 1925. The Post reorganized and received its second national organizational charter as the Sykeston Post 17 on August 6, 1947. On October 29, 1971 the Post reverted to its Bourke-Hollingsworth Post 17 name designation.

Namesake

Severin Bourke was born at Sykeston, North Dakota on May 12, 1896.  He enlisted in the North Dakota National Guard at Harvey, North Dakota on August 14, 1917.  He served overseas from December 13, 1917 until he was Killed in Action on November 18, 1918.  He is buried at the American Cemetery in Bony, Aisne France.  Martin Luther Hollingsworth was born in Mound City, Missouri on May30, 1895.  He enlisted in the North Dakota National Guard on July 3, 1917 at Carrington.  He was called into Federal Service on July 15, 1917. He served overseas from December 13, 1917 until he was Killed in Action November10, 1918.  He was buried in the American Cemetery Meuse Argonne France.

History

The Bourke-Hollingsworth Post 17 of The American Legion at Sykeston, ND, was chartered on August 6, 1919. The post, which had 17 charter members.

The first officers were: Dr. E. F. Swarthout, commander; Peter Guenther, vice commander; C. L. Covell, adjutant; Thomas Lindland, finance and service officers, and Ernest Martin, historian.

Officers serving our 1993-94 year are: Doug Neumiller, commander; Roland Friezen, vice-commander; Ed Huss, adjutant and finance officer; Dennis Hafner, chaplain; Harold Lautt, sergeant-at-arms, and Leander Richter, service officer. Our committees are chaired by Steve Speldrich, membership; James Winandy, Boys State; Paul  chadewald, children and youth, and Roland Friezen, oratorical contest.

We enrolled a 1994 membership of 75.

Programs

The post has supported many community projects and youth programs in the area. Money contributions have been made to many levels of baseball and softball, the Sykeston PTO and the Sykes Park for equipment.

Our post has also sponsored boys to the Boys State program and has made donations to various clubs in Sykeston.

The post has one annual event—the Memorial Day Service–assisted by our American Legion Auxiliary unit. On occasion we hold an open house on Veterans Day.

Post Home

There is no record of meeting places in the 1920s, but commencing in 1947 the post meetings were held in Gene Sondag’s hall and, on some occasions, over Joe Laber’s Blacksmith Shop. In October 1956, the post bought a building for clubroom use on Main Street. In November 1966, the club moved into a building across the street, which at one time was the first school house in Sykeston. The Legion purchased the Catholic Hall in October 1982, our present.

Past Commanders

Past commanders of the post are Dr. E. F. Swarthout, Forrest Daniel, Orville Laber, Sylvestor Sondag, Bernard Huss, Robert Froelick, William Balvitsch, Clifton Edinger, Richard Brown, Leander Richter, Robert Reiland, Alfred Laber, Matt Huss, Darrell Hansen, Harold Lautt, Adrian Richter, Jim Cook, Paul Schadewa1d, John Kutz, Ed  Mittleider, Jim Winandy, Woodrow Esch, Leon Richter and Steve Speldrich.

Past adjutants are C.O. Covell, Irvin F. Zwemke, Peter Guenther, Frank Barber, Harold Kreiter, Elmer Eaton, R. E. Evans, Bernard Huss, Robert Reiland, Matt Huss, Darrell Hansen, William Schaack and Edwin Huss.

Post 18 Hope ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 18, Jefferson-Steinke Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, First District and located in Hope, North Dakota.

Charter

The Jefferson-Steinke Post 18, initially the Earl V. Jefferson Post 18, received its national organizational charter on August 6, 1919. On February 27, 1980 the Post changed its name to the Jefferson-Steinke Post 18 designation.

Namesake

The post was named after Earle V. Jefferson of Hope who was killed in action on July 23, 1918, near Chateau Thierry in the 2nd battle of the Marne during World War I. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Gorden Jefferson and was born in Hope on Aug. 27, 1896. His body was returned from France and he was buried in the Hope Cemetery with military honors by the post which bears his name.  In 1980 the post decided to change the post name to include a name in memory of a World War II man who died while serving his country.

The name was changed to Jefferson-Steinke in honor of Ernest Steinke—who lost his life November 28, 1942, in the Philippine Islands during the “Bataan Death March.” He died while a prisoner of war of the Japanese. Ernest was born in Hope on May 5, 1917. He entered the Army on July 25, 1941. A brother Herb was also killed in action in the European Theatre.

History

In the summer of 1919 The American Legion was organized in Hope. An application for post charter was made and this charter was approved on the 6th of August 1919. The following were the charter members of this post: James T. Cassell, Rolfe C. M. Kraabel, Harry J. Pepper, Ole Thorslund, Albert C. Keiller, Robert Walker, Clarence Hanson, James H. Turnbull, Ernest A. Palfrey, Lloyd D. Gumb, Charles W. Moores, William H. Bowen, Grant F. Miller, Oluf M. Indugaard and W. E. Turner.

Charter Officers

The first officers of this post were: J. A. Cyrus, commander, and Harvey R. Cockle, adjutant. The first flag and post banner were purchased by the businessmen of Hope and presented to the Legion at a regular meeting of the post. There were 26 members during the first year. They include the above listed 15 charter members and Arthur Berggren, E.E. Carney, Harvey Cockle, J.A. Cyrus, Willis Jenne, A. B. McLaughlin, Frank Smalley, Walter Schultz, Merton Trammell, Reginald Thurlow and George Unverferth.

Post Home

In the early years of existence the members met in various places in Hope as they did not have their own facility. In 1952 the post purchased the liquor store building from Vincent Pederson for use as their clubrooms. This building was used until 1968 when the post leased the City Auditorium for their clubrooms. The big move was made in 1975 when the post occupied its present facility. The cost of this facility was $125,000. The building also houses the Post Office and a beauty shop which bring in revenue for the post. The addition of this fine facility to the main street of Hope has brought many functions to this area that otherwise would be held elsewhere. A Mortgage Burning Ceremony was held on June 6, 1987. This mortgage was paid off 18 months ahead of schedule.

George Dorothy was post commander when the project was begun. Other commanders who served during the planning, construction and years since as the post worked to pay off its debt were: David Washburn, Arnold Vigessa, Donald Elston, Keith Jacobson, Balzer Mitzel, Rick Pederson, Allen Gunkel, Everett McCullough, Henning Andersen and Jim Metzger. Outstanding additional assistance came from Finance Officer Donald Sussex, who kept on top of the post’s financial condition throughout the entire period, along with the other officers who served during this period and the rest of the membership who volunteered their time to make this a very successful project!

Programs

During the years the post has participated in American Legion programs, supported and sponsored many community programs and functions. In the 1930s the post was instrumental in the Hope Dam recreation project and also helped the

Hope School District financially. When World War II came along some of the post’s members worked in defense plants to help our nation’s war effort. The members who stayed in the area aided the war effort by holding War Bond drives and many other fund drives such as for Red Cross, etc.

After WW II ended the post grew in membership and also the activities grew, such as a recreation room for the area youth which was developed in the basement of the City Auditorium. Ice skating rinks and independent basketball teams were sponsored by the post. The post has a highly effective youth program. A marching unit was organized and has participated in many department conventions and celebrations around the area.

Sons of The American Legion

In 1994 the post organized a Sons of The American Legion Squadron. The charter, which was issued on April 18, 1994, was officially presented to the squadron by Detachment of North Dakota Commander Mike Hodny of Lankin, ND, during the post’s 75th Anniversary Party on October 8, 1994. The charter members are: John M. Aaby, Jon L. Bayman, William F. Erbstoesser, Dennis D. Erdmann, Steven M. Huschka, Michael L. Johansen, Michael M. Kingston, Clark L. Lemley, Timothy M. Peterson, Loran L. Severson, Boyd G. Sussex, Aric Washburn and John H. Washburn.

The officers of the squadron are: commander – Clark L. Lemley, Vice Commander- Michael L. Johansen, adjutant – Dennis D. Erdmann, finance officer – Steve M. Huschka, historian – John M. Aaby, chaplain – William F. Erbstoesser and sergeant-at-arms – Michael M. Kingston.

When the 75th Anniversary Party was held on Oct. 8, 1994, Post 18 received a Diamond Jubilee Certificate of Recognition from National Headquarters. A number of membership awards were also presented, including 50 continuous years membership plaques to Henning Andersen, Melvin Gunkel and Jerome Huschka. The Auxiliary unit also presented membership awards to Mrs. Harry Bowen, who received a 49-year pin and Mrs. Florence Johnson received a 46-year pin. Other membership awards were presented to their members.

Post Auxiliary

Post 18 is indeed proud of its Auxiliary unit, which was organized in 1920. The Auxiliary’s enthusiastic support and cooperation with the post over the years in serving the community have been outstanding and reflect upon the success of both organizations.

75th Year Anniversary

In 1994 – its 75th year of activity – the Hope Legion had 135 members. The officers for the 1993-94 Legion-year are: commander – Donald L. Anderson, vice commander – Charles Hale, adjutant – Ralph Bayman, finance officer – Donald Sussex, chaplain – Henning Andersen, historian – David Washburn, service officer – Donald Shaskey and sergeant-at-arms – Warren Stromberg.

Gaming Funds Applied to Charitable Activities

With the legalizing of charitable games of chance in North Dakota in 1977, Post 18 has used the net proceeds from its gaming operations to finance numerous Americanism and Children & Youth activities such as American Legion Baseball, which for us is a combined effort with Post 13 at Finley, plus T-Ball, Pee Wee and Babe Ruth Baseball programs. Other programs supported are 4-H, Boys and Girls State, International Music Camp, School Science Fairs Scholarships and Flag programs for youth in the area.

The post contributes to the Veterans Hospital at Fargo and the North Dakota Veterans Home at Lisbon to help volunteer programs at those two institutions provide extra comfort and services to VA hospital patients and Veterans Home residents.

Gaming funds have been used in support of the North Dakota Veterans Cemetery and the Chuck Schroeder Memorial Trust Fund for oratorical contest scholarship awards. Needy families in the area also have been aided when overwhelmed with medical emergency bills.

Record of Commanders and Adjutants of Post 18 at Hope

Legion YearPost CommanderPost Adjutant
1919-20J.A. CyrusHarvey R. Cockle
1920-21J.A. CyrusA.B. McLaughlin
1921-23Frank H. SmalleyRolfe C. Kraabel
1923-24Frank H. SussexCharles W. Wenzel
1924-26Sylvestor WyborneyH.W. Pearson
1926-28Frank DuchanieA.B. McLaughlin
1928-29Hjalmer A. JohnsonHarvey R. Cockle
1929-30G.E. MillerHarvey R. Cockle
1930-31Harvey R. CockleH. C. Anderson
1931-33George UnverferthRudy S. Rygg
1933-35M.O. HenoenRudy S. Rygg
1935-36O.M. JensenRudy S. Rygg
1936-37H.C. AndersonRudy S. Rygg
1937-38Arthur BerggrenRudy S. Rygg
1938-39Frank H. SmalleyRudy S. Rygg
1939-40Victor O. WennerstromRudy S. Rygg
1940-41Frank CampbellHarvey R. Cockle
1941-42Hiller StarkHarvey R. Cockle
1942-43Charles WhitmoreHarvey R. Cockle
1943-46C.C. HawleyHarvey R. Cockle
1946-47J.R. AndreWarren Stromberg
1947-48George A. BrooksWarren Stromberg
1948-49Clinton J.FullerMyril Schoeppach
1949-51Raymond NordboMyril Schoeppach
1951-52Emery EricksonWilbert E. Smith
1952-53*Harry E. BowenClinton J. Fuller
1953-54Clinton J.FullerR. Paul Pederson
1954-55Svend JacobsenR. Paul Pederson
1955-56Henning AndersenHarvey Stowers
1956-57Reynold FuglestadMason Ronde
1957-58Mason RondeWarren Cole
1958-59Svend JacobsenR. Paul Pederson
1959-61Donald R. ShaskyR. Paul Pederson
1961-62Eric L. SalanderEdgar Schmidt
1962-63Daniel MitzelVictor Semrad
1963-64Warren ColeReynold Fuglestad
1964-65Warren ColeDelborn Erdmann
1965-66Delborn ErdmannEdgar Schmidt
1966-68John KeenaRudy S. Rygg
1968-69**John KeenaRalph Bayman
1969-70Richard PickarRalph Bayman
1970-71Lyle PetersonRalph Bayman
1971-72Milton WhitmoreRalph Bayman
1972-73John HansonRalph Bayman
1973-74David WashburnRalph Bayman
1974-75George DorothyRalph Bayman
1975-77Arnold VigessaRalph Bayman
1977-78Donald ElstonRalph Bayman
1978-79Keith JacobsonRalph Bayman
1979-80Balzer MitzelRalph Bayman
1980-82Richard PedersonRalph Bayman
1982-83Allen GunkelRalph Bayman
1983-86Everett McCulloughRalph Bayman
1986-87Henning AndersenRalph Bayman
1987-89Jim MetzgerRalph Bayman
1989-90Dennis KubischtaRalph Bayman
1990-91Timothy JohnsonRalph Bayman
1991-93Cary FuglestadRalph Bayman
1993-94Donald AndersonRalph Bayman

* Term served by Vice-Commander Edgar Schmidt as Harry Bowen was recalled into active duty with the U.S. Army.

** Term served by Vice-Commander Elmer Ehry as John Keena moved out of the area.

Post 19 LaMoure ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 19, Townsend-Good-Shockman Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, Tenth District and located in LaMoure, North Dakota.

Charter

The Townsend-Good-Shockman Post 19, initially the Frank L. Post 19, received its national organizational charter on August 6, 1919. On May 1, 1933 the Post changed its name to the Townsend-Good Post 19 designation. Additionally on March 17, 1947 the Post changed its name to the Townsend-Good-Shockman Post 19.

Namesake

Frank Leslie Townsend was born in Luverne, Minnesota on April 14, 1894.    He was inducted at LaMoure, North Dakota on April 2, 1918.  He arrived overseas on May 2, 1918 and was killed in Action on September 27, 1918.  He was initially buried at the American Cemetery at Meuse-Argonne France and re-interred at LaMoure on September 19, 1921. 

Irl Good was born in LaMoure, North Dakota on July 6, 1984.  He enlisted in the North Dakota National Guard on July 22, 1917.  He served overseas from December 15, 1917 until his death on October 6, 1918 from wounds received in battle in France.  He is buried in the American Cemetery at Meuse-Argonne, France. 

James F. Shockman was born in Grand Rapids, North Dakota on June 15, 1919.  He was a resident of LaMoure County North Dakota.  He entered the United States Marine Corps on September 27, 1939 at Denver, Colorado.  He served in the Asiatic Pacific Theatre in WW II and was Killed in Action on May 6, 1942 in the Philippines.

History

On July 15, 1919, a group of returning soldiers of LaMoure County met in the LaMoure City Hall to discuss the possibility of organizing an American Legion post in our county. Henry E. Cottam was elected temporary chairman of the meeting and Harry Buck, secretary. Committees were appointed as follows: name selection, membership and publicity. The committees were to report at the next meeting. It was the spirit of the meeting to endorse The American Legion movement.

On Oct. 21, 1919, H. R. S. Diesem called to order the first meeting of Frank L. Townsend Post 19 to discuss organizational matters, to elect post officers, to receive committee reports and to discuss and adopt resolutions affecting returning war veterans. Diesem was elected post commander. The mission of the new American Legion Post 19 was to be of service to all veterans to the extent possible, be it emotional, financial or spiritual. That mission remains vital to this very day.

On May 11, 1933, by resolution unanimously adopted, Post 19’s name was changed to Townsend-Good Post 19. In 1934, the Ladies Auxiliary was organized and has been a very important part of our post activities. In 1947, by resolution, the name James Shockman was added, so our post has been known to this day as Townsend-Good-Shockman Post 19.  A new charter was issued by national headquarters March 17, 1947, replacing the permanent charter dated June 20, 1933.

Our post has always endorsed the Preamble to the Constitution of The American Legion. Our post has been very active in community affairs and sponsor of numerous activities, namely, American Legion baseball, Armistice Day (subsequently re-designated Veterans Day) observance, Memorial Day program, funeral services for our veterans, Boys State and music camp.

For God and Country we serve!

Post 119 Commanders

Post YearPost Commander
1919-20H.R.S. Diesem
1920-21M.T. Houghton (Part)
1920-22F.H. Sackett
1922-23W.F. Piper
1923-24H.H. Halliday
1924-26R.R. Teichmann
1926-27P.S. Neilson
1927-28J.B. Hatfield
1928-29David J. Holt
1929-30George W. Green
1930-31Mark Buechler
1931-32Carl E. Carlson
1932-33A.W. Diesem
1933-34Charles E. Uvaas
1934-35N.S. Nelson
1935-36George W. Cunningham
1936-37G.W. Snell
1937-38Fred W. Nelson
1938-39Clifford A. Stevens
1939-40A.P. Ellian
1940-41Edward F. Read
1941-42Theodore Skovgaard
1942-43Otto Hintzmann
1943-44Marvin Holman (Part)
1943-44Edward F. Read (Part)
1944-45William Welander
1945-46C.E. Thomas
1946-48Thomas W. Lynch
1948-49Wallace Muir
1949-50Wayne L. Isenberger
1950-51Charles Freadhoff
1951-52Don J. Robideau
1952-53Lester H. Paulson
1953-54James M. King
1954-55John W. Kinney
1955-57William Boelter
1957-58August Poehls
1958-59O.K. Pawluk
1959-60B.P. Groth
1960-61Robert Muir
1961-62Donald Twete
1962-63Harold Bellin
1963-64Bud Rood
1964-65Dick Triepke
1965-66Ole Haugen
1966-67Robert Housch (Part)
1966-67James Johnson (Part)
1967-68Lowell Bierman
1968-69Albert Ness
1969-70Paul Thielges
1970-71Donald M. Olson
1971-72Alvin Anderson
1972-73Ervin M. Weber
1973-74Robert Muir
1974-75Lester H. Paulson
1975-76Donald M. Olson
1976-79Thomas Shockman
1979-80LeRoy Good
1980-81Ole Haugen
1981-83Joe Diemert
1983-86Richard Olson
1986-87Dan Rood
1987-89Thomas Shockman
1989-90Rodney Lammer
1990-91Judson Phelps
1991-92Ivan Eikenberry
1992-93Rodney Lammer
1993-94Luther Edmund

Post 20 Wahpeton ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 20, Hafner-Miller-Ross Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, Tenth District and located in Wahpeton, North Dakota.

Charter

The Hafner-Miller-Ross Post 20, initially the William R. Purdon Post 20, received its national organizational charter on August 8, 1919. On May 11, 1932 the Post change its name to reflect the Haftner-Miller-Ross Post 20 designation.

Namesake

The post took its name from Major William R. Purdon of Wahpeton, who had served with the original National Guard Company I for many years as captain. 

Harry Edward Ross was born in Cedar Rapids, Nebraska on June 15, 1898.  He enlisted in Company I of the North Dakota National Guard on April 24, 1917 in Wahpeton, North Dakota.  He was transferred to the 1st Division while in France and was killed in action July 20, 1918, at the second battle of the Marne. He served overseas in France from December 15, 1917 until he was Killed in Action on July 20, 1918.  He initially was buried in France but later interred in the Woodland Cemetery in Des Moines, Iowa.  

Jon Hafner was born April 20, 1892, at Mooreton, ND. He enlisted in Company I of the First North Dakota National Guard. He was transferred to Company H, 26th Infantry in France. He was killed in action July 20, 1918, during the Chateau-Thierry drive.

Lawrence Miller was born in Iowa in 1899. He moved to Mooreton with his parents. He enlisted in Company I of the First North Dakota National Guard in July 1917. He was killed in action July 19, 1918, at the second battle of the Marne.

History

On Memorial Day 1919, the following ex-servicemen applied for a charter for an American Legion post: T.J. Thompson, W.E. Morden, David Bezenek, Joseph Granrath, M.J. McCarthy, Joseph Dorn, Frank Bernard, Clarence Ripley, J.C. Jorgenson, Howard Rice, Frank Welch, C.E. Lehman, Ray Visiger, Leslie Stephens, Nicholas Hermes, Hugo Stern, Harry Stern, Elmer Anderson, August Dietrich, Frank Bennett and George Demoray.

The charter was granted on Aug. 8, 1919. The first regular meeting was held Sept. 8, 1919, and David Benezek was elected temporary chairman. The 106 members in good standing as of Nov. 11, 1919, were considered eligible as charter members. Membership reached a high of 564 in 1989.

First Officers

Post officers for the ensuing year were elected on Nov. 8, 1919, as follows: Commander – T.J. Thompson; Vice-Commander – David Bezenek; Adjutant – E.A. Anderson; Finance Officer – Joseph Rickert; Chaplain – Miss Julia Hippe; and Historian – M.C. Olson.

Post Programs

The post has sponsored and has been the leader in many community improvements and social events. A few of the programs in which the post has been involved include developing a park on the horseshoe bend of the Red River; starting a drive for the first swimming pool dedicated in 1937; American Legion baseball, which was first played in Wahpeton in 1931 with an outlay of $250, increasing to $10,000 annually and more with winning teams. The first game under lights in the park was played in 1947.

A new baseball stadium was bid at $64,800 in 1978, with additional improvements adding to the final cost. The field was named after John Randall, who was very instrumental in its development. Other projects include Golden Gloves boxing, Independence Day fireworks displays, tennis courts for high school use, athletic scoreboards and a memorial to Richland County veterans of World War II, Korea and Vietnam, built on the courthouse grounds and dedicated in 1989.

The first five sessions (1938 through 1942) of North Dakota Boys State were held on the campus of the State School of Science at Wahpeton. After World War II, Boys State sessions were resumed in 1947 at North Dakota State University, Fargo.

A memorial to WW II, Korea and Vietnam Veterans was erected on the courthouse lawn at Wahpeton from funds raised by members of Post 20. Jack Schlener was the fund drive chair.

In September 1928, the by-laws were changed to hold the election of officers in October. In 1940, the fiscal year was again changed from May 1 to April 30.

Post Home

The post meetings have been held in various buildings. The Armory was used and at times the Bohemian Hall was rented. In January 1936, the post began meeting in the Knights of Columbus Hall. In June of 1943, the post established clubrooms above the Ben Franklin Store. The present home and clubrooms were occupied in May 1950. The mortgage on this building was burned May 11, 1960. VFW Post 4324 of Wahpeton became a partner in ownership and operation of the building under the name of the Veterans (VET’S) Club on Aug. 16, 1962.

Department Convention

Members of Post 20 have also given of their time to be of service to The American Legion, Department of North Dakota. Post 20 hosted the 1923 department convention at Wahpeton, with Gov. Nesto giving the address.

Serving Beyond the Post

Post 20 members elected to serve as department commander were Dr. H.S. Kreidler, 1932-33; Stan F. Laskey, 1941-42, and Patrick T. Milloy, 1948-49. Milloy subsequently was elected national executive committeeman in 1964 and served four two-year terms.

In 1990, James Horton was elected for a three-year term as eastern region member on the department executive committee. In 1993, he was reelected to serve another three-year term. Dr. Kreidler, 1928-29; Milloy, 1946-47; Jack Schlener, 19168-69, and Horton, 1987-88, served as department vice-commanders. Dr. Kreidler was the first of 11 Post 20 members to serve as district commander, in his case serving in that office for three consecutive years, 1929-32.

Others serving one-year terms were Laskey, 1938-39; A.F. Bader, 1942-43; Earl Robinson, 1950-51; Milton Sletten, 1962-63; Schlener, 1966-67; Roger Freden, 1972-73; Earl Dosch, 1977-78; Harlan Muehler, 1980-81; James Horton, 1984-85, and Dennis Medenwaldt, 1987-88.

John Randall Field, named for a longtime member of Post 20, is one of the Legion’s major projects at Wahpeton. The electronically operated scoreboard is one of two the Legion has provided in the city. The second one is located at Alumni Stadium on the campus of the North Dakota State College 9f Science.

Post 20 Legionnaire of the Year Honorees

In 1970, Post #20 established the “Legionnaire of the Year” award in memory of O.J. Dietz, who was a dedicated member of the post.

Post YearLegionnaire of the Year
1969-70John Quinn
1970-71Patrick T. Milloy
1971-72Jack Schlener
1972-73B.C. Thompson
1973-74Melvin Olson
1974-75Richard Wolf
1975-76Earl Dosch
1976-77James Horton
1977-78Warren Doberstein
1978-79John Randall
1980-81LeRoy Edwards
1981-82Harlan Muehler
1982-83Donald King
1983-84Earl Mittag
1984-85Duane Ballweber
1985-86Dennis Medenwaldt
1985-86Clifford Hermes
1986-87Lyle Schlotfeldt
1987-88Charles Christensen
1988-89Harold Bruschwein
1989-90Milton Sletten
1990-91Louie Lovcik
1991-92Harvey Ostby

Post 20 Commanders

Post YearPost Commander
1919-20T.J. Thompson
1921Arnold Forbes
1922Gilbert Reeder
1923 (Jan-Aug 9th)Dr. I.C. Edwards
1923 (Aug-Dec)George Holthusen
1924Albert Bader
1925I.J. Englehart
1926E.F. Gilles
1927Harry Stern
1928John Peschel
1929 (Jan-Oct)Dr. H.S. Kreidler
1929-30 (Oct-Oct)A.W. Plachte
1930-31John Quinn
1931-32E.L. Kaatz
1932-33Hugo Stern
1933-34S.F. Laskey
1934-35LeRoy Pease
1935-36Samuel Lien
1936-37Jason Murray
1937-38O.J. Dietz
1938-39E.A. Anderson
1939-40 (Oct-May)E.R. Nickel
1940-41 (May-May)N.O. Jones
1941-42B.P. McCusker
1942-43William McClintock
1943-44Leo Gilles
1944-45T.F. Stelten
1945-46Alvin Meyer
1946-47Patrick T. Milloy
1947-48Earl Robinson
1948-49LeRoy Hausauer
1949-50B.J. Steiner
1950-51Gordon Paape
1951-52Albert Ehli
1952-53Ira Keeney
1953-54Clifford Stoebe
1954-55Herbert Gast
1955-56Vernon Frank
1956-57William Crawford
1957-58Jack Schlener
1958-59Elroy (Alex) Wegener
1959-60Al Schneider
1960-61Hubert Lambertz
1961-62James Norton
1962-63Russell Comstock
1963-64Earl Dosch
1964-65Edwin Wolter
1965-66Lynn Comstock
1966-67Harold Diederick
1967-68Ronald Saurdiff
1968-69Garfield Score
1969-70Ronald Evenson
1970-71Milton Sletten
1971-72Roger Freden
1972-73Carroll Quam
1973-74Harlan Muehler
1974-75Richard Wolf
1975-76Harold Bruschwein
1976-77Larry Speidel
1977-78Clarence Miller
1978-79Milton Fuchs
1979-80John Randall
1980-82James Horton
1982-84Earl Mittag
1984-85Duane Ballweber
1985-86Dennis Medenwaldt
1986-88Clifford Hermes
1988-89Lyle Schlotfeldt
1989-90Harvey Ostby
1990-91Reuben Brownlee
1991-93Richard Olsen
1993-94Harvey Ostby

Post 21 Lakota ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 21, Rundell-Holicky Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, Second District and located in the Lakota, North Dakota, the county seat for Nelson County.

Charter

The Rundell-Holicky Post 21 received its national organizational charter on August 8, 1919.

Namesake

Post 21 was named after two area soldiers killed in action during World War I in France. Maynard L. Rundell was the son of William C. and Mary Rundell of Lakota. He was born at Mapes, ND, Dec. 18, 1895. Pvt. Rundell, responding to his country’s call, entered the service Apri129, 1918, at Lakota. Prior to sailing for France June 20, 1918, Pvt. Rundell had been trained at Camp Dodge, Iowa; Camp Travis, Texas, and Camp Mills, New York. He was killed in action Sept. 12, 1918, at St. Mihiel only a few hours after arriving at the front line trenches.

Frank B. Holicky was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Math Holicky of Lakota and was born there Jan. 6, 1897. He enlisted June 29, 1916, at East Grand Forks, MN. Cpl. Holicky was ordered overseas April 1, 1918, with the 9th Machine Gun Battalion. He was killed on the firing line at Chateau Thierry July 15, 1918.

History

The Lakota American Legion post was founded in 1919, with the charter dated August 8, 1919. The first officers (1919-20) were Post Commander Adrian Foley, Vice-Commander W. A. Burke, Adjutant George Holicky and Historian Henry Sjurseth.

The charter members were Albert W. St. John, George J. Holicky, Ray Ferries, G. G. Kuryin, Carl Boxsted, James J. Slaby, Herman Boxsted, Arthur J. Gronna, Henry S. Sywiseth, Frank Halum, Myron W. Hutman, J. A. Baird, W. A. Burke, Adrian Foley and Ben Foley. The last surviving World War I era members of Post 21 were Sy Grinde, Adolph Alfredson and Ole Johnson.

In 1994, the post had 103 members. Its all-time high enrollment was 146 members in 1948.

Programs

Rundell-Holicky Post 21 is very active in local affairs, sponsoring summer recreation and baseball programs, Boys State and scholarships to the International Music Camp. The post supports a wide range of activities benefitting area schools, senior citizens clubs, fire and ambulance departments, nursing homes and any other worthy area causes which need financial help.

The White Cross area in the Lakota Cemetery was designed and built by Farnum Schultz in 1972. Originally, this memorial plot was set up in an area where there were no graves. After Elsie Benson, Lillian Larson, Esther Benson, Edwin and Augusta Larson donated a black marble monument dedicated to all veterans who served in the armed forces, the field of crosses was arranged around the monument in the center of the cemetery.

Each year Education Week is recognized by distributing flags to first grade students and remembering the other students and teachers with special gifts. The Legion’s birthday is observed with a supper served by the Auxiliary, followed by a dance.

Honor Roll

Nelson County and Lakota area men killed in action.

WORLD WAR I

Frank B. Holicky- Army

Maynard L. Rundell- Army

Martin L. Urdahl- Army

Knute Holberg- Army

Edward Broberg – Army

Royal Osmer Gray – Army

Ludwig Tande – Army

John M. Larson- Army

Willie B. Mattson- Army

Alfred Hanson – Army

Eugene B. Brasseur – Army

Peter Peterson – Army

Ole M. Morken – Army

Ole Semeling – Army

W. L. Cowper – Army

Jacob Christianson- Army

Dreng H. Roislana – Army

Martin Johnson – Army

WORLD WAR II

George A. Gray – Air Force

William F. Billings – Army

William Baxter – Army

Oris C. Mygland – Army

William Robson – Army

Warren Nelson – Marines

Duane L. Poissant – Navy

Donald Bagne – Army

Harold Molberg – Army

Donald McDonald – Army

Lloyd E. Bums – Army

KOREAN WAR

Vernon A. Lindvig – Air Force

VIETNAM

Michael A. Evenson- Navy

Post 21 Commanders

Post YearPost Commander
1919-20Adrian Foley
1920-21George J. Holicky
1921-22W.A. Burke (Part)
1922-23Albert W. St. John
1923-26George Shunk
1926-27Albert W. St. John
1927-28Earl L. Burns
1928-29Elvin Nelson
1929-30I.H. Anderson
1930-31W.W. Arnold
1931-32Oscar Lading
1932-33J.L. Metcalf
1933-34E.W. Lowen
1934-35Oscar Ladwig
1935-36Ray L. Buck
1936-37John Eklund
1937-38E.L. Tordoff
1938-39S.O. Grinde
1939-40C.L. Thompson
1940-41Oscar W. Nelson
1941-42Edward W. Ritteman
1942-44Herman H. Hullett
1944-46Thomas Devine
1946-47R.E. Roberts
1947-48Donald F. Sloan
1948-49Harris H. Knauss
1949-50Lysle C. Boostrom
1950-51Julius E. Berg
1951-52Merlin Munson
1952-53Verdun L. Burkland
1953-54Warren Westensee
1954-55Jack Ritteman
1955-56Lyle Dykhoff
1956-57William Verwey
1957-58Lloyd Craft
1958-60Maurice G. Benson
1960-62Orville Peterson
1962-63Marcus Schmidt
1963-64Farnum Schultz
1964-65Vincent Peterson
1965-66Adrian Anderson
1966-67George Leith
1967-68John Braniff
1968-69Elvin Johnson
1969-71Arnold Keim
1971-72Kermit O. Sherve
1972-73Maynard Elgin
1973-74Orville Peterson
1974-75Neil R. Hatten
1975-76Lawrence Bill
1976-78Roger C. Sateren
1978-80Lloyd Johnson
1980-82Robert Benson
1982-83Arnold Keirn
1983-84David Kjorsvik
1984-85Neil R. Hatten
1985-88George Miller
1988-91Donald F. Sloan
1991-92Lloyd Johnson
1992-94Roger Sateren

Lakota Auxiliary

The Auxiliary assists with the Memorial Day program. Our junior members hand our programs and the poppy poster winners, Girls State and Boys State delegates are recognized. Following the program, a dinner is served in the Legion Clubroom by the Auxiliary with attendance usually being approximately 200 to 250 people.

The organization supports community projects including donations to the school and school activities, library and senior citizens as well as serving our veterans at home and in the VA Hospital at Fargo.

Post 22 Marion, ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 22, Frank X. Sczygiel Post, was a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, tenth District and located in Marion, North Dakota.

Charter

The Frank X Sczygiel Post received its national organizational charter dated August 8th, 1919 and was disbanded on May 4th, 1934.

Namesake

It appears Frank X. Sczygiel went into the United States Army and served overseas in France.  He was killed in action on September 26,1918.  He is buried at the American Cemetery at Meuse-Argonne, Romagne-sous-Montfavcon France.

History

Post Officers/Membership

Post YearCommanderAdjutantMembership
1919   
1919-20Harold CrossmanO. M. Opsahl29
1920-21No RecordDonovan Wheeler 
1921-22Oscar M. OpsahlDonovan Wheeler 
1922-23No RecordDonovan Wheeler 
1923-24Jesse M. SpoerlDonovan Wheeler 
1924-25Harold H. BehlmerP. A. Wheeler 
1925-26Harold H. BehlmerHoward Winkelman 
1926-27Harold H. BehlmerHoward Winkelman 
1927-28No RecordNo Record 
1928-29No RecordNo Record 
1929-30Harold H. BehlmerHoward Winkelman 
1930-31William F. LoweHoward Winkelman 
1931-32William F. LoweHoward Winkelman 
1932-33No RecordNo Record 
1933-34Post Disbanded May 1934

Post 23 Rugby ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 23, Clarence Larson Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Third District and located in Rugby, North Dakota.

Charter

The Clarence Larson Post Lavern J. Thompson Post 23 received its national organizational charter on August 8, 1919.

Namesake

Clarence Albert Larson was born in Tunbridge, North Dakota on May 16, 1896.  He enlisted in the North Dakota National Guard at Minot on July 21, 1917.  He served overseas in France from December 15, 1917 where he died of wounds received in battle on March 9, 1918.  He was buried at the American Cemetery at Meurthe-et-Moselle France.

Clarence Larson Post 23 at Rugby was chartered Aug. 8, 1919, after getting organized earlier that month. It was named to honor the first man from Pierce County who was killed in action during World War I.

History

The charter members were George D. McClintock, A.A. Opatz, Arthur L. Jacobson, Earl Christianson, A.L. Christianson, R.K. Jennings, Andrew Degenstein, George P. Woods, S.A. Melhouse, O.A. Monson, E.S. McMahan, P.E. McMahan, Thomas E. Annis, J.R. McLeon and H.E. Lavik.

Leading the Rugby post to a good start were these first-year officers: George D. McClintock, commander; A.A. Opatz, vice-commander; Clarence M. Oliver, adjutant; Andrew Degenstein, finance officer, and Joseph M. Buehl, historian.

Post Home

The Pierce County Memorial Building was built as a memorial to all servicemen killed in action in WW I. A county mill levy was authorized in 1919 by the North Dakota Legislature, but it wasn’t until 1927 that representatives of the local Legion post, its Auxiliary and the American War Mothers requested the levies. In 1929, lots were purchased and the project started. Members of the post and Rugby businessmen excavated the basement with pick and shovel to help keep costs down.

The building was completed and dedicated in 1930. The main floor, kitchen and dining room are used for many community events. Designated as a veterans’ room, this facility is the post’s current clubrooms and is used by all veterans’ organizations in the community.

Programs

The American Legion in Rugby has been involved in many community activities as well as Legion programs. The post secured a large plot at the Priscilla Watts cemetery. It is called the Veterans Plot and is a free burial site for any veteran requesting to be buried there. The post sponsored a drive and purchased the first fracture bed for the Good Samaritan Hospital (now Heart of America Medical Center.)

American Legion Baseball

The post has sponsored American Legion baseball for many years and has had one State Class “B” Championship, which was achieved in 1964.

Boys/Girls State

Boys State, sponsored by the post, and Girls State, sponsored by the Auxiliary, are important programs. In 1962, Paul Presthus was elected governor of Boys State and a delegate to Boys Nation. That same year Maija Seisums was elected governor of Girls State and went to Girls Nation. These honors were a great credit to the youth of the Rugby community!

Oratorical Contest

Rugby students won the district oratorical contest seven consecutive years. Loren Anderson won the State Contest in 1963 and Don Gaetz won back-to-hack titles in 1965 and 1966.

The Rugby post has been and still is a sponsor of students to International Music Camp, including several who have gone on to become members of the Music Camp Band and Choir touring Europe in various years. Post 23 raised funds during 1973-7 4 to build a practice hut at Music Camp and furnished it with a used piano.

We are grateful to ladies in our Auxiliary unit for the marvelous cooperation and support they have given to us in serving the Rugby community.

Color Guard

After World War II, the local post was called upon to provide military honors for deceased veterans. In 1953, an official color guard was formed and Legion uniforms were purchased. Unit members are called upon to furnish gravesite military rites for departed comrades as well as to perform at other events both in Rugby and at the International Peace Garden, where they have represented the Department of North Dakota on several occasions.

Veterans’ Memorial

In 1986, the local veterans organizations together with the support of the community and the Pierce County Commissioners planned and built an All-Veterans Memorial made of granite and engraved with the names of fallen comrades of all wars. The existing evergreen trees were removed, the area was sodded and a walk was built to the monument on the grounds of the Memorial Building.

Membership

The Rugby post has worked hard at maintaining a strong Legion membership. During the past two decades, the Post 23 membership has ranged between 261 members in 1994 and its all-time high enrollment of 330 in 1978.

The post has sponsored many fun nights for the members. This is important in maintaining espirit de corps within the membership for carrying out the programs and activities of The American Legion … “For God and Country.”

Post 24 Devils Lake

The North Dakota American Legion Post 24, Tim Running Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Third District and located in Devils Lake, North Dakota.

Charter

The Tim Running Post 24 received its national organizational charter on August 8, 1919.

Namesake

Tim Running-was from Devils Lake and served from September 1917 until he was killed in action on October 12, 918 in France.

Post 25 Carrington ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 25, John Raymond O’Hara Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Fourth District and located in Carrington, North Dakota.

Charter

The John Raymond O’Hara Post 25 received its national organizational charter on August 16, 1919.

Namesake

Carrington’s Post 25 was named after John Raymond O’Hara, who was born in Carrington on Nov. 1, 1896. He enlisted on February 14, 1917, and served in Company L, 9th Infantry. Engagements included Offensive: Aisne-Marne. Defensive: Aisne. Defensive Sectors: Toulon and Troy on (Lorraine), Chateau-Thierry (Ile-de-France). Mr. O’Hara died August 3, 1918, of wounds received in action. He was buried in the American Cemetery, Surenes, Seine France.

History

A preliminary organization of Post 25 of The American Legion was held June 19, 1919, in the City Hall in Carrington, ND, with about 40 World War I veterans in attendance. James Morris was elected temporary chairman and Hugh Putnam temporary secretary. James Morris was elected the first post commander on June 25, 1919.

A constitution and by-laws were formed for government of the local post. Regular meetings during the year were set for the last Wednesday in April, June, August and October. No winter meetings were held as the membership was so widely scattered over the county. Meetings were held at the City Hall.

Many dances were held in the early years of Post 25 as fund raisers (tickets sold for 50 cents and the band cost $18). Over 10,000 people gathered in the city of Carrington on the 4th and 5th of July 1924 for a celebration sponsored by The American Legion. A large parade of floats was held, along with airplane stunt flying, baseball games between teams from Grace City, Sykeston and Bordulac, as well as street sports and races. A dance topped off the day of events.

James Morris was a delegate from the department to the first national American Legion convention which was held in Minneapolis. He served on the national constitution committee, political restriction section, which was the committee that wrote the Constitution of The American Legion.

Membership

John Raymond O’Hara Post 25 was the only American Legion post in Foster County at this time. Initial membership dues were set at $2 per member.

Sons of the American Legion

The Sons of The American Legion was formed and a constitution and by-laws were adopted in February 1937. The A.B. Johnson Trophy for Community Service was awarded to the Carrington Squadron of the Sons of The American Legion for its outstanding work during the year 1938.

Street of Flags

Carrington’s “Street of Flags” was presented to the city just before the start of the Memorial Day Parade in 1968. The flags were donated by the Foster County State Bank and American Legion Post 25.

Post’s 50th Anniversary

Legionnaires and Auxiliary members of the local area and from neighboring communities joined in the celebration of the 50th anniversary of John Raymond O’Hara Post 25 on Friday evening, Nov. 22, 1968, at the Chieftain Motel. Among visitors were dignitaries of the Legion, including department officers and past officers, many of whom spoke. Post Commander R. C. Heinley took a prominent part in the program, as did Norman H. Hanson, immediate past Post 25 commander and master of ceremonies. Among the distinguished guests include Judge James Morris, a charter member of Post 25 and its first commander, as well as Mrs. Morris, past national president of The American Legion Auxiliary.

Post’s 75th Anniversary

Post 25 celebrated its 75th anniversary in March 1994 at the V.F.W. Club with a dinner and program headed by Post Commander Dale Townsend. World War I veterans Ole Ihringer and Arthur Wilcox received special recognition from veterans and spouses. Department Commander Don Herrly was also in attendance.

Avenue of Flags

On Sept. 4, 1990, Marvin Rathe presented a proposed project- to install U.S. flags along the main road into the Carrington Cemetery. The project was accepted by the membership and, during the Memorial Day program in 1992, Post 25 dedicated the “Avenue of Flags” at the Carrington Cemetery. The half-mile long display was completed with over $8,000 in donations and a total of 84 United States Flags (42 on each side of the road). The flags are at mast during veterans’ services and other special occasions.

Programs

Post 25 supports a strong American Legion baseball program, oratorical contests, Boys State and Girls State, the International Music Camp and many other worthwhile programs.

Service Beyond the Post

Also, in 1938, Milton G. Kelly of Devils Lake was elected state commander of The American Legion and P.J. Goss of Carrington was elected state vice-commander. Post 25 member, Wes Martin of Carrington, was elected department commander at the 76th annual department convention at Bismarck, the weekend of June 17, 1994.

Post 26 Minot ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 26, William G. Carroll Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Sixth District and located in Minot, North Dakota.

Charter

The William G. Carroll Post 26 received its national organizational charter on August 16, 1919.

Namesake

William Glenn Carroll was born in Minot, North Dakota on August 23, 1897.  He enlisted in the North Dakota National Guard on June 4, 1917 and was called into Federal Service on July 15, 1917.  He served overseas in France from December 15, 1917 to July 20, 1918 when he died of wounds received in battle.   His body was returned for burial in Minot’s Rosehill Cemetery and he was posthumously awarded the Silver Star. He also served on the Mexican border during the Mexican border war. 

History

William G. Carroll Post 26 was organized and chartered in August 1919. Charter members were: R.M. McKey, James J. O’Leary, Neil E. Wheeler, James H. Dougherty, Lloyd Wilhelm, W. F. Gettelman, Leo H. Rudd, W.K. Skeoch, Harry Hall, B.Z. Lyons, William T. Marsh, Thomas H. Stamus, P. B. Robbins, Frank Warner and William O’Leary.

Post Home

Following WW II and the Korean War, activities of the post expanded to the point that members decided to vacate their club in downtown Minot and build a new post home on North Hill. The post grew to a membership high of 3,227 members in 1978. But minor problems grew into major proportions, which created serious rethinking. In 1984, following the state’s control of gaming and the ever-increasing costs in club operation and entertainment, both tied to inflation, the post was forced to sell its elaborate home on the hill. Members faced reality and rented a facility downtown. Regrouping in 1991, post members decided again to return to ownership of their post home. World War II inductees would assemble at Minot’s Soo Line Depot to depart for military duty. After this depot was closed many years later, it was designated a historical site. In 1991, it became the home of William G. Carroll Post 26 which has enabled members and the post to continue a more active leadership role in the Sixth District and to host district conferences.

Programs

Since its charter date, Post 26 has maintained a patriotic and active role in the community. The post is devoted to advancing veterans’ aims and seeing that American Legion-sponsored youth programs are supported with active post committees.

Post members again are providing leadership roles in the department and some members are active participants in the State Legion Band, which has been a department convention musical fixture for seven decades.

Last Man’s Club

Service Beyond the Post

Post members having served as department commander were: A.B. Carlson, 1924-25; William H. Johnson, 1933-34; Harold G. Piper, 1940-41, and Robert E. Hennessy, 1981-82. Hennessy also served as the Department of North Dakota’s member on the national executive committee during 1984-88.

Post 27 Steele ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 27, Miller Post, was a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Fifth District and was located in Steele, North Dakota.

Charter

The Miller Post 27 received their national organizational charter on August 16, 1919. The Post disbanded and its charter was cancelled on May 9, 2005.

Namesake

No information available

Post 28 Harvey ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 28, Frank E. Curry Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Fourth District and located in Harvey, North Dakota.

Charter

The Frank E. Curry Post 28 received its national organizational charter on August 16, 1919.

Namesake

The Frank Erwin Curry was born March 2,1886 in Hastings, New York.  He enlisted in the North Dakota National Guard on July 17, 1917 in Harvey, North Dakota.  He was discharged on November 26, 1917 as a Private to accept a commission.  He was then commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant on November 27, 1917 and assigned to the 147th Machine Gun Battalion.  He was killed in action on October 21, 1918 and is buried at Farme-de-la-Madelaine, France

Post 29 Watford City ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 29, Carl E. Rogen Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Ninth District and located in Watford City, North Dakota.

Charter

The Carl E. Rogen Post 29 received its national organizational charter on August 18, 1919.

Namesake

Carl Edwin Rogen was born April 27, 1892 in Volga, South Dakota.  He enlisted in the North Dakota National Guard on July 15, 1917.  He served overseas from December 15, 1917 and was killed in action on October 5, 1918 while serving with Company I, 26th Infantry, in France.  He is buried at the American Cemetery, Meuse-Argonne, France. 

History

A temporary charter was issued to this post by national headquarters on Aug. 18, 1919. The permanent charter was certified by national headquarters on Aug. 1, 1920 and by state headquarters on Aug. 10, 1920. The charter members listed on the temporary charter are H.A. Petrick, S.C. Malkewick, C.S. B€1nson, S.O. Dundas, W.C. Homm, Jacob Losk, Orlando D. Smith, H.M. Thomas, Hjelmer Anderson, Alan Vandergrift, J.C. Nelson, E.J. Anderson, F.R. Pollack, J .L. Colman and Henry Allex.

The first post officers were H.W. Petrick, commander; H.M. Thomas, vice commander; S.C. Malkewick, finance officer; S.O. Dundas, adjutant; W.C. Homm, historian, and Olaf Norstog, chaplain.

Membership has grown from 62 during the first year to a high of 355 in 1983. The post’s 1994 membership was 248.

The post is indebted to those individuals who struggled to keep it alive through the many lean years between the Great Wars.

Post Home

In the early years of existence, the members met in various homes at Watford City and at other locations in the county, such as Arnegard, Alexander, Grassy Butte, Keene, Charlson and Sanish. As time went on, the AOUW Hall was a popular place for the meetings. In the 1940s, meetings were also held in the county courthouse.

The first mention of a Veterans Service Club, better known as the Legion Club, was in December of 1943. E.J.  Nestaval, Oscar Knudtson and Lee Stenehjem were appointed to meet with the Post War Planning Commission to discuss plans for the proposed Legion home.

The Legion Club, as we know it today, was opened in 1946. A building was rented and Everett Day was named the manager. The building was sold to Glenn Lawlar and Oene Lawler. When the Legion Club was moved to its present location, this building was owned by Bob Sanford and Lloyd Stevens, or S&S Motors.

It was sold to Bryant Kellogg on April 16, 1949, and then Kellogg sold the building to the Watford City American Legion Building Association on April 26, 1949, for $17,000. Kellogg held the mortgage. The Legion club was moved to basement of this building in 1949 and remained there until 1969 when it moved upstairs where it presently located. The loan for this building was paid off on April 19, 1956. November of 1969, another mortgage for $25,000 was taken out so the club could move to the upstairs area. This loan paid off in January of 1978.

In the 1980s, club began to get behind and by the by 1990s was on the verge of closing doors. A $61,000 loan was taken out in June 1994 to pay our debts. Through donations of many of the members and from the gaming operation, we have managed to stay open.

Joel Grotte was the club manager from 1954 until he retired in 1979.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is image-30.png

Post Recognition

The post has four POWs: Lawrence Roesner, Elmer Evanson, Clarence Johnson and Clarence Christianson. Three are still living and are post members.

One of our members, Jack Bazer, was inducted into the state American Legion Baseball Hall of Fame in 1978.

The post has honored to have had two state commanders, Truman C. Wold (1951-52) and H.F. “Sparky” Gierke III (1983-84), and each has also served as national vice-commander. Sparky went on to become the Legion’s 1988-89 National Commander. The post has had 75 commanders. Three members served two terms and one member served three terms.

The end of World War II brought the return of many eligible veterans and a rapid expansion of post membership and activities. The post officer for our 75th year were Commander – Ron Anderson, First Vice Commander – Keith Braddock, Second Vice-Commander – Dean Meyer; Adjutant – Jerry Beck, Chaplain – Ron Rankin, Sergeant-at-Arms- Jilek Bazer, Post Service Officer – Bill Faulkner and Historian – Merle Kleppen .

Programs

The post is proud of its donation to and the sponsorship of various community projects and programs throughout the years. Funding for American Legion Baseball, which required approximately $1,000 a season in earlier years, now costs up to $9,000 annually.

In 1992 the post purchased electronic pull tab vending machines and expanded its gaming activities to the bars in Watford City, Arnegard, Grassy Butte and the big opening at Fairview, MT. To date, we operate seven games and blackjack.

Over the years substantial contributions have been given to the local hospital, Good Shepherd Home, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, the swimming pool and innumerable other programs and projects. Other programs the Legion sponsors are Boys State and Oratorical Contest.

Since 1992 gaming proceeds of over $225,000 have been given to community and charitable organizations. Some of those organizations are: Hockey Club, Legion Baseball, Boys State, Girls State, Arnegard Boosters Club, Arnegard Park Board, Grassy Butte Park Board and Cemetery Association, Heritage Park, McKenzie County Veterans Memorial Building, Badlands Gymnastics, Legion Drill Team, Veterans Memorial Park, Prairie Ramblers Snowmobile Club, Archery Club, Watford City Fire Department, scholarships, prom party, after graduation party, Food Pantry and many other charitable programs.

The first Boy Scout charter was obtained in 1930 under the sponsorship of Carl E. Rogen Post 29. Oscar Hagen was the first scoutmaster, and Alan Vandergrift, J.A. Hieb, Art Rude and Kris Stenslie were assistants.

Post Auxiliary

The American Legion Auxiliary of Carl E. Rogen Post 29 was organized in 1921. There were 16 charter members who were Mrs. Jorgen Anderson, Mrs. S.O. Dundas, Elidah Folven, Minnie Knecht, Florence Oder, Alice Rude, Lillian Rude, Lottie Rude, Mrs. Claude Staley, Mrs. C.D. Smith, Mrs. O.D. Smith, Viola Thomas, Irene Vandergrift, Mildred Vick and Gertrude Williams. The first officers were President – Mrs. Irene Vendergrift, Vice President – Mrs. Lottie Rude, Secretary – Mrs. Viola Thomas, Treasurer – Minnie Knecht.

Through the years the Auxiliary sponsored baby clinics, sent boxes to the needy and ill, added hospital equipment and participated in Memorial Day services. They also sponsor a banquet on Veterans Day and girls to North Dakota Girls State every year. They loan equipment such as wheel chairs and walkers. Vera Kummer is presently in charge of the loan program. The Auxiliary presently has a membership of 153, 115 senior members and 38 junior members.

Drill Team

The Watford City American Legion Drill Team was organized on March 1, 1952, as an affiliate of Carl E. Rogen Post 29. Its primary aim is to provide the military rites at the funeral of any person who has served honorable in the U.S. armed forces. Charter members included: William Christianson, Harold Conant, Grant Day, Bud Drovdal, Jim Dundas, Allen Gunderson, Wally Johnston, Lyle Judkins, Ornar Linseth, Kenny Loken, Earl Quale, Gerry Rogness, Cliff Stavn, Pete Veeder, Arno Wisness and Arne Wollan. These were the fellows who attended the first organizational meeting. Wally Johnson is the only member still actively serving. There have been 87 members who have served on the drill team.

Memorial Park

Our Veterans Memorial Park was donated by two Watford City businessmen, Ross Luttrel and J.P. Christianson. The park, which was donated in 1940, is named for these two men. Memorial Day observance programs are held in this park. There was an eternal flame placed in the park but has since been discontinued.  There are 100 flag poles that are maintained as an Aisle of Flags. These flags are flown each Memorial Day. Each pole has the name of a deceased veteran placed on it; many poles have more than one name posted. There are 130 names placed on poles thus far.

Two members of each veterans’ organization serve as the Memorial Park Board. Arne Wollan is the president and Van MaLoney is the secretary-treasurer.

Post 30 New Rockford ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 30, Raymond B. Thorn Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Fourth District and located in New Rockford, North Dakota.

Charter

The Raymond B. Thorn 30 received its national organizational charter on August 18, 1919.

Namesake

The Raymond B. Thorn was born on August 21, 1899 in New Rockford, North Dakota.  He enlisted in the North Dakota National Guard at New Rockford on August 21, 1917.  He served overseas in France from December 15, 1917 until he was killed in action on October 15, 1918. He is buried at the American Cemetery at Meuse-Argonne, France.

Post 31 Hansboro

Namesake

The Hansboro Post-Named after the town of Hansboro

History

The North Dakota American Legion Post 31, Hansboro Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Third District and located in Hansboro, North Dakota.

Charter

The Hansboro Post received its initial national organizational charter on August 18, 1919. The Post disbanded and its charter was cancelled on June 15, 1925. The Post reorganized and was granted a second charter on December 11, 1946. This post subsequently disbanded and the charter was cancelled on May 4, 1960.

Post Officers/Membership

Post YearCommanderAdjutantMembership
1919  16
1919-20George WilliamsMelvin A. Olson16
1920-21Disbanded 24
    
1946-47W. J. StevensTrygve Sunde23
1947-48Charles E. DisherClyde W. Geib21
1948-49Charles E. DisherClyde W. Geib24
1949-50Lawrence L. GeibClyde W. Geib25
1950-51Clarence PetersonClyde W. Geib15
1951-52Walter L. WhiteClyde W. Geib23
1952-53Walter L. WhiteCharles E. Disher36
1953-54John E. LawlerCharles H. Seghers25
1954-55John E. LawlerCharles H. Seghers26
1955-56Vergo S. ManningCharles H. Seghers25
1956-57Vergo S. ManningCharles H. Seghers24
1957-58Darl C. ThomasCharles H. Seghers17
1958-59Post Disbanded 13

Post 32 Drake ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 32, David D. Nehrenberg Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Sixth District and located in Drake, North Dakota.

Charter

The David D. Nehrenberg Post 32 received its national organizational charter on August 23, 1919.

Namesake

The post was named to honor the memory of David D. Nehrenberg, a Drake resident.  He was born in Twin Brooks, South Dakota on January 1, 1897.  He enlisted in Company D, 1st Infantry, North Dakota National Guard at Minot on July 10, 1917 and was called into Federal service on July 18, 1917.  He served overseas from December 14, 1917 until he was Killed in Action on May 2, 1918 at the Cantigny front in the Picardy Sector in France. He was the first resident of Drake and McHenry County to lose his life in action in World War I. His remains were returned from France and were the first to be interred in The American Legion’s plot at the Drake Cemetery.

History

A brother, Alfred Nehrenberg, was a charter member of the post. Another younger brother, Harold Nehrenberg, a WW II veteran now living in Florida, maintains his membership in Post #32. David’s mother, Mary Nehrenberg, was the first president of The American Legion Auxiliary unit in Drake.

Two sons (of Herman and Theresa Drake, who were the founders of the town of Drake) Charles A. and Owen were charter officers of Post 32. Another son, William, also joined in 1919. Theresa Drake and a daughter, Rose Refling, were charter members of The American Legion Auxiliary at Drake.

The American Legion Post 32 at Drake was organized in August 1919 (one of the earliest established posts in N.D. as evidence by its low post number.) The post’s charter was issued at national headquarters Aug. 23, 1919.  Representatives of the post attended the Legion’s first state convention at Bismarck in mid-October 1919.

Charter members of David D. Nehrenberg Post 32, who signed the application for a Legion post at Drake, were C.A. Drake, Jacob Kloss, Charles Hersey, J. Score, Alfred Nehrenberg, Fred C. Roth, Lawrence Mauritson, George M. Iverson, Joe Nussbaum, Goodman Selvog, John A. Everson, Lloyd McQuay, Tycho Weigelt, William McNamara, Jr. and O.J. Selvog.

The last charter member, Goodman “Ned” Selvog, died at Minot, ND, on June 10, 1993. He had participated in the Memorial Day observance at Drake 10 days earlier. He is buried at Minot.

Membership of Post 32 is composed of veterans from Anamoose, Balfour, Drake and Kief communities. It’s all time high membership was 130 in 1975, and its 1994 membership totaled 85.

Drake Cemetery

The original Legion plot at the Drake Cemetery was donated by Herman and Theresa Drake to Post 32 for burial of American veterans and to be managed by the post. In March 1970, the post purchased additional lots and on April 27, 1993, the City of Drake, which had received ownership of the Drake Cemetery from the Drake family estate, donated nine more lots to Post 32. The cemetery flag pole was erected following the 1970 purchase.

Veterans’ Memorial

Our WW I Legion members purchased and had mounted a memorial cairn and flag pole at the Drake Public School grounds, which they dedicated to “Veterans of All Wars” on the 11th Hour of the 11th Day of the 11th Month of 194l. In the fall of I968, members of the post sodded the flag memorial area at the school grounds as one of its 50th anniversary projects.

Post 32, with help from the Auxiliary, sponsored an “All Veterans” Memorial and had it erected at the Drake City Park. The granite plaque includes the Legion and Auxiliary emblems and is mounted in a cairn of brick and mortar. The memorial, including a 30-foot aluminum flag pole with automatic floodlight to permit 24-hour display of the flag, was dedicated as part of the May 28, I989, Memorial Day observance.

Post Auxiliary

The Ladies Auxiliary of Post 32, from the beginning, has been a prominent and active participant in Legion and patriotic observances as well as in community affairs. They include: city park beautification projects, sponsoring delegates to Girls State, annual memorial Poppy sales, decorating and maintaining the Legion clubrooms, fund-raising events and meal preparations for social events.

One member of our Auxiliary unit, Mrs. Martha Krause, served as 1958-59 Department President of the North Dakota Legion Auxiliary. Martha passed from this life on Febreuary 23, 1993, at age 88. Burial was in Trinity Lutheran Cemetery at Drake.

Post Home

From the time of its organization, the post’s clubroom and meeting facilities has been located at four different locations in Drake until March 2, 1964, when the post purchased the Rodewald Electric Co. building on Main Street, using the lower level for its club and meeting rooms and renting the street-level area to the U.S. Post Office.

At the Nov. 11, 1968, Veterans Day banquet program, it was announced that the mortgage was paid up, marking the first time that Post 32 had a debt-free home since the founding of the post 50 years earlier. A mortgage-burning ceremony and party was held in February 1969.

During the Veterans Day program on November 11, 1968, with Department 50th Anniversary Committeeman Tom Willoughby of Minot the guest speaker, Department Adjutant Vernon Useldinger of Fargo honored WW I Legionnaires C.A. Drake, L.W. (Roy) Belzer, E.W. Fors and Lloyd McQuay (who was unable to be present), with life memberships provided by Post 32. Also recognized in the audience that evening were Rose Refling and Mrs. E.W. Fors, both charter members of the Drake Legion Auxiliary unit.

In 1976, a building was constructed next door to The American Legion building, which was later sold to Wayne Rieniets, a member of Post 32. Then, the Post Office moved to the new structure, leaving both levels of the Legion’s facility for meetings and club events.

In 1986, Post 32 purchased and installed street signs for the entire city of Drake. In earlier years, Post 32 had been active in sponsoring American Legion baseball teams and delegates to Boys State.

Post 33 Fessenden ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 33, Frank Proisl Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Fourth District and located in Fessenden, North Dakota.

Charter

The Frank Proisl Post 33 received its national organizational charter on August 23, 1919.

Namesake

The post’s 36 charter members named the post in honor of the first resident from Wells County killed during World War I, a farm laborer named Frank Joseph Proisl.  He was born in Vienna, Austria on September 8, 1895.  He enlisted in Company B., 2nd Infantry, North Dakota National Guard at New Rockford, North Dakota on June 29, 1917 and was called into Federal Service July 15, 1917.  He died on March 18, 1918 from wounds received in combat in France.  He was buried at the American Cemetery Thiaucourt, Meurthe-et- Moselle, France.  Among other awards and decorations, he received the Silver Star.

History

Programs

The post has been active through the years with many activities for the youth and adults of the community, including Memorial Day and Veterans Day, the latter known as Armistice Day prior to 1954.

Youth activities sponsored by the post include Boys State, International Music Camp at the Peace Garden, American Legion and Babe Ruth baseball, local and district oratorical contests to qualify high school students for participation in the state oratorical contest as well as for scholarships at the various levels of competition.

Service Beyond the Post

A number of our members have provided leadership and service in higher offices of our state organization. Otto G. Krueger, C.J. Olson and Fred J. Schmidt each served a one-year term as department vice-commander. Olson (two terms) and Schmidt served as 4th district commander, as did W. E. Mathaei, Fred Gimblett, Walt A. Zellmer, Merlin Mannel, Wiilys Springer and Owen Wallace. Gimblett also was department finance officer for four years.

Post Meetings

Our post meets on the third Monday from September through May each year. We hold steak nights every two weeks from October through April to raise funds to operate the post and pay for the programs we sponsor each year.

Color Guard

The post has a color guard and firing squad, which units participate in all special occasions of Post 33, to include funerals for our comrades and many community events of note such as the Wells County Fair each June and the Fessenden City Centennial of 1993.

Memorial

Post 33 dedicated a Flag Pole Memorial in memory of Pfc Daniel Neuenschwander, a marine who was killed May 15, 1968, in Vietnam.

Membership

The post’s 1994 membership was 91; its high year was’ 167 in 1946 when returning WW II vets swelled our ranks.

Commanders

The first commander of Post 33 in 1919-20 was Ben Oser, and Vernon Pranke was our 75th anniversary year commander during 1993-94. Ed Olstad of Manfred, ND, was our last World War I member.

Post Auxiliary

The American Legion Auxiliary’s Frank Proisl Unit 33 in Fessenden was chartered in October 1921 with 21 members. Mrs. Ben Oser, the unit’s first treasurer, was the last charter member to die. The unit has grown to a membership of 108 in 1994.

In the early years the unit met upstairs in a building housing an insurance office, a lawyer and rooms known as the Masonic Hall. The unit meets the first Monday of every month.

Members work hard at raising money to fund their programs: Americanism, Girls State, veterans’ affairs and rehabilitation, Poppy Day, and community service.

Our Auxiliary takes part in the annual Memorial Day and Veterans Day programs.

The first member of our unit to become a district president was Mrs. Warren Delzer in 1966. She attended the national convention that summer at Washington, DC, and served as a page for the department president. After her term as district president, she served as state Americanism chair. The second member of our unit to become district president was Delores Kost. We feel that we have a progressive and active Auxiliary with willing workers that complement our American Legion post.

Post 34 Towner ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 34, Towner Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Sixth District and located in Towner, North Dakota.

Charter

The Towner Post 34 received its national organizational charter on September 2, 1919.

Namesake

The Towner Post-Named after the town of Towner

Post 35 Lignite ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 35, Monson and Finkenhagen Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Sixth District and located in Lignite, North Dakota.

Charter

The Monson-Finkenhagen Post 35, initially the Oscar Finkenhagen Post 35, received its national organizational charter on August 23, 1919. The Post disbanded and its charter was cancelled on June 15, 1925. The Post reorganized after WWII and received its second national organizational charter as Monson-Finkenhagen Post 35 on January 16, 1947.

Namesake

The Monson-Finkenhagen Post 35, was initially named the Oscar Finkenhagen Post.  Oscar Finkenhagen was born at St. Paul, Minnesota on April 15, 1895.  He was inducted at Bowbells, North Dakota on May 24, 1918.  He was Killed in Action on October 25, 1918.  He was initially interred in the American Cemetery in France and later interred at Lignite, North Dakota.  It appears that the Monson name in the Post is that of Ernest L. Monson who was born in Lignite, North Dakota on March 22, 1925.  He entered the U.S. Army on November 28, 1942.  He served in the European, African and Middle East Theatres.  He was Killed in Action on July 5, 1944 at Normandy, France and is interred in the American Cemetery at Normandy.

*There are many, many Monsons that served in WWII but this appears to be the one the Post is named after.

Post 36 Oakes ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 36, Bean-Goodwin Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, Tenth District and located in Oakes, North Dakota.

Charter

The Bean-Goodwin Post 36, initially the Howard Bean Post 36, received its national organizational charter on August 25, 1919.

Namesake

Bean-Goodwin Post No. 36, Oakes, ND, originally was named Howard Bean Post #36 in honor of Bean, who died July 23, 1918, at an army hospital in Paris, France, after suffering wounds in action. He had come to Oakes in 1915 and entered into partnership with his brother in the Oakes Tire Company when he was called to duty. His remains were returned in August 1921 to Oakes for interment. The Rev. James Opie gave a sermon on “Our First Martyred Boy.” Full military honors were provided by Post 36.

In 1920, it was learned that another local boy, Alfred Goodwin, had enlisted September 8, 1917, in Company K, 2nd Infantry, North Dakota National Guard, at Ellendale. He was then called to overseas duty in France December 15, 1917, and was killed in action July 19, 1918, just four days before Howard Bean. His remains were buried at the Aisne-Marne Cemetery near Belleau, France.

The post was organized August 16, 1919. Charles Schill served as the first post commander and Ed Bassingwaite was the adjutant. The other original charter members included E.A. Frojen, W.J. Nolan, Fred Low, Arthur Straub, A.M. Fuller, R.H. Sheldon, M.P. Romstad, Henry A. Nelson, Charles F. White, Oscar A. Swanson, Earl Bellinger, Frank Freeman, Erik L. Buland, and George C. Eakens.

The post then decided to change the name to Bean-Goodwin Post 36. A memorial to these two servicemen is displayed on the south wall of the meeting room of the Post #36 Legion home. One of the first things the post did for the community was to originate the idea of a Christmas tree, with the commander acting as Santa Claus handing out bags of candy and nuts to the children.

History

Early Post Programs

Interest in the new organization, The American Legion, was good as membership rose from 38 in 1919 to 68 in 1920. During the next few years, the post began taking on new responsibilities. In 1929, medals were awarded to the outstanding eighth graders. Welford Mauck and Viola Enger were the first to receive medals.

An American Legion baseball team was organized in 1930 and during the following year, official Legion baseball uniforms were purchase for the team.

Our neighboring Post, M.J. McElvain Post 152 of Fullert n, ND, merged with Oakes post in 1932.

Community service was a big part of the post philosophy from the beginning and, in the mid-1930s; the post became the sponsor of the Oakes Girls High School Drum and Bugle Corps. This group made its first appearance during the Oakes 50th Anniversary celebration May 28, 1936. This musical unit continued to perform until 1955.

Boys State and Sons of The American Legion were great programs launched at the national level in the 1930s. Tom Roney of Oakes was the first boy sponsored to the initial 1938 North Dakota Boys State, held in Wahpeton. In 1982, Mike Mathias of Oakes was elected governor of North Dakota Boys State.

Bean-Goodwin Post 36 is proud to have elevated one of its members to the position of state commander. Harry C. Edblom, local newspaper man, was elected department commander in 1937.

During his term of office, he helped organize the Boys State program in North Dakota. For the first five years, the weeklong Boys State program was conducted on the campus of the State School of Science at Wahpeton.

A Legion Club board was elected in 1945 when the club was established. Bylaws were drawn up to help govern post activities and the club. When Japan surrendered September 2, 1945, ending World War II, the post joined with the community in welcoming many veterans returning home upon being discharged from the armed forces.

Soon after the ending of WW II, the mantle of leadership in the post was passed to the new generation of veterans. Guy Van Middlesworth was the first WW II veteran elected commander at a special post meeting in 1947.

Our Oakes Legion baseball team, coached by Lloyd Parker, won the 1951 State Class B championship.

Post Home

Under the leadership of Commander Elmer Smith, the post voted to construct a new American Legion home in 1956. Commander Smith appointed a building committee, chaired by Floyd Ferguson. Members of the committee were Hugh Nichols, Benny Garland, George Lyon, Walt Busche, Elmer Smith and Don Charpentier.

Commander Smith, in his dedicatory address, declared that “… this building will be known as The American Legion Memorial Building. We have erected this memorial in honor of our departed comrades who fought so valiantly to safeguard and transmit to posterity the principles of justice, freedom and democracy.” During this era, the Post 36 membership grew to 241.

Community service and patriotic gestures continued to hold priority in the Bean-Goodwin Post. In 1960, a flagpole was set on a cemetery lot that was donated to the post. In 1968, our Legion Post along with the Lions Club and the Commercial Club jointly developed a tennis court facility.

An outstanding feature of the Oakes American Legion Club is the display of the handcrafted replicas of war medals. These medals were made by Bob Benson.

In 1972, the Oakes Athletic Association along with the Oakes Park Board and Post 36 jointly agreed to rename the city ball park the Nate Cummings Athletic Field. A dedication was held that October honoring Cummings’ many years leadership in baseball and school activities.

Returning Vietnam veterans were honored at a special dinner and program in 1974. In the spirit of ‘76, Post 36 enrolled an all-time high bicentennial-year membership of 339. From The 1973 to 1993, post enjoyed 20 years of 300-plus enrollments.

Cummings, who had served 12 years (1947-59) on the department athletic committee, the last nine as chairman, was inducted posthumously into the North Dakota American Legion Baseball Hall of Fame in 1977 during ceremonies held at the State Legion Baseball Tournament that year in Fargo.

Charitable gaming became a reality in 1977 in North Dakota. Soon the pull tab jars and black jack tables were familiar sights in Legion clubs. For many years, Bean-Goodwin post donations averaged approximately $25,000 a year for community projects, including wrestling mats purchased in 1984 for the Oakes High School.

In 1982, the Legion Club was remodeled to extend the bar area. A sliding door provided separation for special functions and social events. The post also voted to become a sponsor for the Oakes Prairie Twisters Gymnastics that year.

A new All-Veterans Memorial and flagpole were erected on the west side of the plot of land donated in 1960 to the post by the Oakes Cemetery Association. The memorial and flagpole are surrounded by evergreens and shrubs, creating a beautiful setting with an automatic watering system. The post now has several plots available where veterans can be buried.

The dedication was on Memorial Day 1987 with Department Chaplain Rev. Jerry Salveson as the speaker. This project inspired a new spirit in the post.

Continuing our community service, we joined the Lions once more to complete the new track field in 1988.

Beginning with Harry Edblom (1934-35), nine Post 36 members served as district commander through the years: Mike Morgan (1946-47), Nate Cummings (1949-50), Wally Schafer (1961-62), Clifford C. Day (1965-66) and again

(1986-87), the latter to complete the year for Vernal Anderson of Gwinner who died mid-term, Willis Pritchard (1967-68), Chester W. Setterlund (1971-72), Glenn Schlenvogt (1991-92) and LaMoine Sonnenberg (1992-93). After his year as district commander, Schlenvogt served the next year as department vice-commander for the eastern region.

Post 36 observes The American Legion’s established, programs each year on Memorial Day, and Veterans Day. Nathan Ulmer, leader of the firing squad, schedules early-morning visits to hold gravesite rites at Fullerton, Clement, Ludden and Oakes. More than 200 flags are placed on the graves of veterans. At 11:00 a.m., a Memorial Day service is held with a speaker and the reading of the honor roll. For Vet4rans Day, a special service is held November1 11 with a tribute to veterans of all wars. A chili and oyster feed follows the service.

A Christmas time custom for the post for several years has been to join with The American Legion Auxiliary and Oakes businessmen to put on a bingo party for all area children under 12 years old. Prizes are donated and the children look forward to this event each year.

The North Dakota American Legion has had a state band composed of statewide veterans since 1924. Emmett Haugen of Oakes was an active member of that band for four decades.

Lasting debts of gratitude are owed to fellow Legionnaires who have served on committees and held offices over the years. We are extremely proud of our legacy of community services as a post and we commend each of you.

Post 36 Commanders

Post YearPost Commander
1919-20Charles Schill
1920-21E.A. Sullivan
1921-22E.A. Bellinger
1922-23Dr. I.R. Maercklein
1923-24E.A. Bellinger
1924-25R.C. Peterson
1925-26Otto LeRoy Savo1d
1926-27C.L. Bevins
1927-28Roy A. Muxen
1928-29George H. Lyon
1929-30G.M. Morgan
1930-31Leonard Turner
1931-32John B. Gallagher
1932-35Roy A. Muxen
1935-36R.C. Peterson
1936-37Jack Knudson
1937-39L.C. Mueller
1939-40 W.M. Anderson
1940-43E. F. Bassingwaite
1943-44H.C. Edblom
1944-46George M. Morgan
1946-47B.A. Quam
1947-48R.B. Isakson
1948-49Russell G. Mosier
1949-50Dale F. Forbes
1950-51Emmett I. Haugen
1951-52Hugh F. Nichols
1952-53Robert Dudley
1953-54Harry E. Klundt
1954-55Clifford C. Day
1955-57Elmer Smith
1957-58Floyd I. Ferguson
1958-59Glenn Schlenvogt
1959-60Wallace Shafer
1960-61Harold Foss
1961-62Willys Johnson
1962-64Melvin Backlin
1964-65Walt Busche
1965-66. Ernest Podolak
1966-67Harold Kunz
1967-68Willis Pritchard
1968-69Walter Ulmer
1969-70Donald G. Baldwin
1970-71Chester W. Setterlund
1971-72James Moore
1972-73Robert L. Benson
1973-74Tom Kelsh
1974-75Jerome Praska
1975-76Donald W. Christenson (Part)
1975-76Qale Vosburg (Part)
1976-77Clayton Day (Part)
1976-78Lester Trnka
1978-79Marlo Tveter
1979-80Mike Kelly
1980-81Dennis C. Dukart
1981-83Timothy Kelly
1983-84Kenneth Gemar
1984-86Richard Paul
1986-87Gary Seyer
1987-88George Ubben
1988-91LaMoine Sonnenberg
1991-92Leon Lanphere
1992-93Harold Hansen
1993-94Willis Pritchard

Post Auxiliary

Bake sales, apron sales, raffles and many innovative fundraising events have been sponsored by the Auxiliary, starting with the leadership of Jennie (Mrs. Harry) Edblom, the unit’s first president. By 1922, the membership had doubled and in 1923, it was decided to hold meetings at the Union Temple rather than in homes of the members.

Through the years, the Auxiliary has continued to grow and to support veterans and children. The annual poppy sales have become a major thrust for this support. Among the projects of the local Auxiliary are Christmas gifts and time spent playing bingo at the Veterans Home in Lisbon, memorial gifts to the City Library and donations to the Good Samaritan Center.

They are also very proud to be an active supporter of Girls State. In 1978, Roberta (Huebner) Forward was elected Governor of Girls State.

The Oakes Auxiliary has always been active in district and department activities with many of the members holding offices at those levels. Those who have served as department president are Mrs. T.H. Ferber (1939-1940) and Mrs. Clifford Day (1976-1977). Members chosen to lead District 10 with two-year terms as president include Mrs. Hugh Nichols ( 1954-56), Mrs. Clifford Day (1964-66), Mrs. Chester Setterlund (1970-72), Mrs. William Mangnall (1976-78) and Mrs. George Ubben ( 1984-86).

Post 37 Williston ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 37, Edgar M. Boyd Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Ninth District and located in Williston, North Dakota.

Charter

The Edgar M. Boyd Post 37 received its national organizational charter on August 25, 1919.

Namesake

The son of a farming family who lived north of Williston, Boyd offered his services to his country immediately after the declaration of war, but was not accepted at that time due to a physical impairment. However, an operation enabled him to pass the physical and he was accepted in the U.S Army at Williston.

Edgar Markell Boyd was born in Rolla, North Dakota on December 14, 1897. He enlisted in Company E, 1st Infantry, North Dakota National Guard at Williston on April 20, 1917. He was called to federal service on July 15, 1917. He served in France from December 15, 1917 and was wounded on Juned 1, 1918. He was killed in action on July 19, 1918. He engaged in battle at Aisne-Marne, Defensive Sectors Anasauville (Lorraine), Contigny ((Picardy). He was buried in the Oise-Aisne American Cemetery, Aisne, France. Among other awards and decorations he was posthumously awarded the Silver Star.

A communications runner for Co. H, 26th Infantry Regiment, 1st Division, Pfc Boyd was struck down while making his way through heavy German defensive fire delivering battle orders directing a segment of the Aise-Marne offensive.

History

In early 1919, when most WW I veterans had returned home, the news went out that a North Dakota American Legion veterans organization had been founded with headquarters in Fargo. Quick to respond was Williston veteran and community leader, Lt. Col. Joseph W. “Bud” Jackson, who fired off a letter to Julius R. Baker, Legion state chairman, requesting the necessary papers and authority to organize a post at Williston.

Upon receiving a favorable reply to his letter and a charter application, Jackson set up a meeting of veterans on August 12 in the Williston Armory. A total of 25 attended.

Appointed temporary chairman, Jackson set the tone of the meeting by being first to place his name on the original post charter application. George Harvey, named temporary secretary, also was a signer as were William W. Jeffrey, Erwin K. Bruegger, John W. Hogan, Jr., Joseph Bell, Goerge H. Tolbert, Clair T. Lynch, Howard E. McDonald, Frank J. Gunderson, David d. Beattie, Berry Houglum, Wilfred J. “Bill” Carpentier, Louis L. Rolette, Albert Carlson, Herbert A. Metzger, Bert Brown, Dr. Frederick McMullen, James W. Harvey, Ernest F. Rolette, Estern Suhky, Benjamin Willkinson, Randel O. Nesting, Carl Lindstrom, Boyd Cormany and Edmund H. Shemorry.

Following the charter membership signing of the application for an American Legion post, the document was sent to state Legion Chairman Baker in Fargo, where on August 21, 1919 it was favorably endorsed by Jack P. Williams, secretary of the North Dakota Legion temporary committee. Next it was forwarded to Legion headquarters in New York City for a second endorsement on August 25 by Eric Fisher Wood, secretary of the Legion’s national executive committee. He in turn mailed the approve charter to Fargo to receive a third endorsement by Williams for the state Legion’s organizing committee. The charter was then mailed to Jackson for formal presentation to the newly organized post at Williston—the 37th post to be chartered in North Dakota.

A second meeting of the post on September 10, 1919, had 25 new members taken in and the charter ratified. Membership totaled 52. John W. Hogan, Jr., was elected post commander (Jackson having declined the honor because of his intentions to join his physician brothers in Madison, WI, as business manager of their Jackson Clinic.) Other officers elected included Howard McDonald, vice-commander; Dr. Frederick McMullen, adjutant, and H.O. Koppang, treasurer.

Anxious to get started in the work of signing up an anticipated 200 additional members, post officers sent out special invitations announcing that on September 27th returned veterans would be guests at a community veterans day program. Featured attractions included a football game and automobile, motorcycle and bicycle racing. More than 150 veterans and their guests were present at the Armory for a free banquet and dance that evening.

Post Has Active Life

Since its formation in 1919, Edgar M. Boyd Post 37 has had an active life, following the principles and projects set forth by The American Legion. Its membership has grown from the original charter group of 26 to a high of 844 in 1990. In 1994, its 75th year, the roster was 741.

In the beginning, post meetings were held in the Williston Armory and later in rented or donated downtown rooms. In 1928, a two-story farm home was purchased and moved to 115 West Broadway, the present location of Williston’s Teen Center. The post quarters moved again in 1944 to 20 East 2nd Street. Here, a bar was established as well as meeting rooms. Then, in 1948, another move took the post to its present home at 115 First Avenue East.

Three Department Commanders

The post has had three of its members elected as department commander, has provided leadership and has seen action in just about every segment of the Legion organization. Harry E. Polk, WW I veteran, was first to have the honor of serving as department commander, holding office in 1946-47. He was followed by Korean veterans, Floyd Semenko (1986-87) and Raymond Atol (1992-93).

Host Six Department Conventions

The Williston post, known for its western hospitality as well as its ‘get up and go,’ has hosted six department conventions, during which speakers of national prominence have appeared at the rostrum.

In 1933, National Legion Commander Louis A. Johnson flew to Williston to deliver his message to the department convention. The parents of Edgar M. Boyd also were honored guests. The two-mile long convention parade featured 30 floats, including the appearance of the French War Brides. There also was an Indian pow-wow.

National Legion Commander Milo J. Warner of Cleveland, Ohio and North Dakota Governor John Moses were the principal speakers in 1941. The raging conflict in Europe created a war motif to the convention, including the appearance of a Forty et Eight boxcar equipped with an anti-aircraft gun.

President Dwight Eisenhower couldn’t make it to Williston’s third state convention in 1960, but Vice-President Richard Nixon (and his wife Pat) did. North Dakota Governor and Legionnaire John E. Davis were among the speakers.

During the 1965 convention, servicemen of the Vietnam Conflict, as well as doughboys of World War I, were present to receive praise for their work for veterans from National Commander Donald E. Johnson.

State Adjutant Jack Williams, who had held this position since 1919, was reelected once more.

Cuts in funding for the Veterans Administration were criticized by National Legion Commander Dale Renaud during his appearance at the 1986 convention. This also was a time when two Williston men were elected to high offices, Floyd Semenko to state commander and Chuck Joseph to grand chef de gare of the N.D. Forty et Eight. The election of two Legionnaires to top posts during a convention in their home town was considered to be most exceptional.

“Don’t forget the sacrifices of the soldiers,” was the theme of N.D. Lt. Gov. Lloyd Omdahl, speaker at the 1991 convention. His remarks were pointed towards those who served in the two world wars, the Korean and Vietnam conflicts, and the Persian Gulf containment. Retiring Department Adjutant Vernon Useldinger, who had served in this post for 24 years, received a standing ovation.

Through the years, it has locally been considered a great honor to have served as chairman of the state Legion conventions held here. Those who have been so honored are: Joe Mendro, Sr., 1933; Harry E. Polk, 1941; Polk and Rufe Gentry, 1960; Tony Klein, 1965, and Ray Atol, 1986 and 1991.

Drum and Bugle Corps

The Williston Drum and Bugle Corps consistently has brought audience applause and appreciation for its colorful performance in parades, competition and various community; events. Under the direction of Virgil Sjverson, the unit took first place in convention competition in 1964 and 1965. First organized in 1928 by WW I veterans then reorganized in 1947 by veterans of WW II, the corps has been an active, trophy-winning and energizing force in support of many Legion projects.

Post Auxiliary

The Williston American Legion Auxiliary had its beginning in 1919 when the Legion’s first national convention November 10-12 in Minneapolis passed an act establishing a women’s Auxiliary. The following spring the Williston Legion invited women to meet in the Odd Fellows hall for the purpose of organizing a Williston Auxiliary.

The 32 women enrolled as charter members were: Mary A. Harvey, Mathilda I. Jaynes, Margaret Mathews, Edith E. Cormany, Clara E. Sveen, Lily B. Palmer, Lily Nelson Jeffrey, Louise C. Smith, Elsa Clausen, Alice Lindstrom, Mrs. Amy Wilkinson, Jannette Craven, Lily Wilkinson, Mayme Nesting, Manilla Harvey, Margaret Heffernan, Esther Rawitscher, Rhoda Mae Harvey, Birdie Mathews, Pearl M. Harvey, Mavel Cashman, Edna M. Hovind, Oleta L. Metzger, Della C. Ruud, Alice B. Erickson, Mae E. Bell, Jessie Sveen, Margaret Metzger, Mildred McMullen and Doris Sveen.

Another meeting was held May 19, 1920, presided over by Oleta Metzger, president pro tem, at which permanent officers were elected. Mrs. Mary Harvey, who had four sons in the armed services, became the first president.  Others elected were Mrs. Minnie Slaytor, vice-president; Mrs. Mayme Nesting, secretary, and Mrs. Millie Jeffrey, treasurer.

Thus began a loyal, patriotic and energetic organization, now almost 75 years of age, whose purpose has always been the active support of their men in many, varied veterans’ projects. Four Unit 37 ladies led the North Dakota Legion Auxiliary as department president: Mrs. John W. (Bea) Payne, 1940-41; Mrs. Peter I. (Mabel) Dahlen, 1949-50; Mrs. John W. (Gladys) Stannard, 1956-57, and Mrs. Floyd V. (Lyla) Semenko, 1990-91.

Voiture Locale #360, Forty and Eight

Voiture Locale #360 was chartered August 22, 1922, with 24 voyageurs signing the application. This small group is involved with all programs of the local Edgar M. Boyd Post 37 of The American Legion, plus supporting a separate program of its own by furnishing scholarships for nurses training. The voiture also supports programs of the Forty et Eight’s national organization.

Key to qualifying for membership in the Forty and Eight is to be an active Legionnaire. At the present time, 74 voyageurs comprise the membership of Voiture 360. Nine of our voyageurs have headed the North Dakota 40 et 8 as grand chef de gare, serving one-year terms as follows: Walter McGahey, 1926-27; Charles Devine, 1932-33; Willard C. Sveen, 1942-43; Elmer E. Cecil, 1951-52; M.W. (Red) Chapek, 1973-74; Floyd Semenko, 1981-82; Chuck Joseph, 1986-87, and Jordis Larvick, 1993-94.

Sons of The American Legion

In the spring of 1935, the Sons of The American Legion Squadron 37 organized at Williston, later disbanding when many members entered World War II military service. The squadron reorganized in 1990 with 40 charter members.

Post Officers & Membership

Post YearPost CommanderPost AdjutantMembers
1919John HoganDr. Fred MacMullen132
1919-20John HoganDr. Fred MacMullen173
1920Howard McDonaldH. Bertelson173
1920A.W. DolphWalter Charnholm173
1920-21 Harry Lempke108
1921-22George G. HarveyHarry Lempke82
1922-23Carl H. EricksonW.W. Jeffrey120
1923-24Walter McGaheyHoward McDonald129
1924-25W.W. JeffreyGeorge G. Harvey120
1925-26Louis DawsonWalter McGahey126
1926 Alec Rawitscher126
1926-27D.C. PolingW.C. Sveen93
1927-28Joseph MendroJames A. Brown185
1928-29William ArchibaldArthur J. Gronna120
1929-30Charles DevineE.J. Olson130
1930Peter I. DahlenE.J. Olson130
1930-31Alex RawitscherAlf. R. Krohn214
1931-32J.W. HarveyBen R. Bartz106
1932-33Herb A. MetzgerR.M. Gross151
1933-34S .L. ThomsonBen A. Myhre128
1934-35Ben A. MyhreA.B. Degree173
1935-36R.M. GrossB.N. Meland169
1936-37B.N. MelandElmer E. Cecil218
1937-38Elmer E. CecilAlbert Zimmerman161
1938-39W.C. SveenAlbert Zimmerman136
1939-40R.L. BorkJ.N. O’Keefe142
1940-41Arthur G. GronnaLynn E. Fortsch230
1941-42Harry E. PolkClair J. Romans168
1942-43Fred A. DoughertyClair J. Romans179
1943-44James A. BrownLloyd Petty168
1944-45Clair J. RomnnsLloyd Petty243
1945-46Lloyd PettyRay Bell674
1946-47Ben R. BartzTelmar E. Rolfstad661
1947-48Ross JeffreyTelmar E. Rolfstad573
1948-49Evertt E. PalmerTelmar E. Rolfstad511
1949-50C.O. HardingRobert W. Moran483
1950-51Gil StenehjemRobert W. Moran524
1951-52Stanley ToneRobert W. Moran525
1952-53Bernard CersonskyRobert W. Moran563
1953-54Robert W. MoranFrank L. Onufray631
1954-55Kenneth W. KlineFrank L. Onufray663
1955-56LaVern C. NeffFrank L. Onufray585
1956-57Harry W. ChapmanFrank L. Onufray463
1957-58Andy ManzFrank L. Onufray468
1958-59Harold I. IsachsenFrank L. Onufray493
1959-60M.W. ChapekGil Stenehjem565
1960-61Floyd SemenkoGil Stenehjem532
1961-62Jordis LarvickGil Stenehjem474
1962-63Lloyd SwensonGil Stenehjem427
1963-64Ray ElderGil Stenehjem472
1964-65Frank VennesGil Stenehjem519
1965-66Roger PrindivilleGil Stenehjem509
1966-67Tony KleinGil Stenehjem525
1967-68Linus EderGil Stenehjem518
1968-69Ray AtolW.A. “Bill” Hamre509
1969-70Fred WhisenandW.A. “Bill” Hamre508
1970-71W.A. “Bill” HamreRay Atol529
1971-72Chuck JosephW.A. “Bill” Hamre532
1972-73David K. LongW.A. “Bill” Hamre529
1973-74Carl DubeJordis Larvick559
1974-75Jerry MartinsonJordis Larvick543
1975-76Chester HinricksenJordis Larvick535
1976-77Jerry AndersonJordis Larvick563
1977-78Randy NelsonJordis Larvick549
1978-79Donald OversonJordis Larvick 562
1979-80John SandersJordis Larvick569
1980-81David BergJordis Larvick582
1981-82Bill BaxterJordis Larvick595
1982-83Lyle NelsonJordis Larvick617
1983-84Keith KullandJordis Larvick636
1984-85Keith KullandJordis Larvick681
1985-86A.J. ChristmanJordis Larvick709
1986-87Thomas WhiteJordis Larvick728
1987-88Louis HindererGary Skarphol778
1988-89W.C. YeagerGary Skarphol824
1989-90Charles BattesGary Skarphol844
1990-91Ted KrogenGary Skarphol835
1991-92Stanley LysonGary Skarphol807
1992-93Donald RanumGary Skarphol787
1993-94Dan GerhardtClayton Benth741
1994-95  743
1995-96  696
1996-97  702
1997-98  712
1998-99  705
1999-00  690
2000-01  743
2001-02  790
2002-03  780
2003-04  644
2004-05  591
2005-06  582
2006-07  558
2007-08  541
2008-09  506
2009-10  473
2010-11  452
2011-12  424
2012-13  400
2013-14  396

*All-time High Membership

Post 38 Cogswell ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 38, Lawrence Milton Berg Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, Tenth District and located in Cogswell, North Dakota.

Charter

The Lawrence Milton Berg Post 38 received its national organizational charter on August 25, 1919.

There were 661 charter members in the newly-formed post. The first officers were: Post Commander, C.E. Howard; Vice-Commander, Max Bale; Finance Officer, Kirk G. Bale; Adjutant, Bartie McGraw; Historian, Roscoe Montgomery, and Chaplain, Sam Noyes.

Namesake

Lawrence Milton Berg was born in Superior, Wisconsin on December 2, 1897.  He enlisted in the Navy at Minneapolis, Minnesota on April 13, 1917.  He died onboard the USS Montana on April 24, 1918 and is buried in Greenwood Cemetery Superior, Wisconsin

History

Post Home

The Legion held its first meetings in a small building: on the north side of Cogswell’s maid street. In August 1948, the post moved into another location which was known as “The Woodman Hall.” A lot of work and time went into getting the building ready to be used for meetings. The Cogswell Community Center was built in 1980, and a move was then made into this new building where the post meetings are still being held.

Memorial Programs

The Legion holds Memorial services at cemeteries at Brampton, Old Sargent, Mt. Calvery, Stirum and Harlem each year on Memorial Day. The color guard, firing squad and other post members take part in the service. Bronze grave markers are provided for each veteran’s grave and a flag is placed in each one on Memorial Day. Columns were erected many years ago in each cemetery in honor of veterans, and a wreath is placed at the base during the service in honor of the veterans who have been laid to rest.

A special service is held at the Community Center following the services at the cemeteries. A program consisting of a speaker, music and a special memorial service for Legion and Auxiliary members who have been lost during the past year is held. A pot-luck dinner for the community concludes the day’s activities. The Legion color guard and firing squad provide military rites at funerals for veterans when requested by the families. Legion members wear their Legion uniforms when they take part in any of these services.

The Legion post supported and helped with the placing of an “All Veterans Memorial,” which, was erected on the front lawn of the Sargent County Courthouse in Forman, ND. Cogswell Legionnaires took part in the dedication of this memorial November 11, 1994, and assist with the Veterans Day ceremony which takes place on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month each year.

Post Youth Baseball Programs

The Post has and is still doing a lot youth of the community. A baseball program was started in 1932 to be actively supported by the Legion. A baseball park was established and, in 1960, a concession stand was built. This has been replaced by a new building. The diamond was fenced and trees planted. The park also has an enclosed bleacher, press box, covered dugouts, lighted score board, and modern bathrooms. Two buses have been purchased and have been maintained for transportation to out-of-town games.

The Post also helps support Pee Wee, Little League and girls softball. Many trophies have been won by the Post team in 1961 and are still a topic of conversation. Boys from several towns in Sargent County play on the teams sponsored by the Cogswell Legion post.

Other Programs

Contributions have been made by the Post to many community and school projects.

Contributions have been made by the post to manly community and school projects. Flag poles and flags have been placed at sport fields and community halls. Money has been raised in many ways for worthwhile projects. Public bingo was held for many years. Money has also been raised by dances, card parties, rodeos and raffles. All of the money was used to support the baseball program and other worthwhile needs in the area.

The Cogswell Legion sends several boys to Boys State each year. One of its delegates, Kirk Smith of Cogswell, was chosen as governor of Boys State in 1947.

The post has awarded scholarships to International Music Camp for several years. Several students from Sargent Central are recipients each year and take part in both instrumental and vocal sessions at the Peace Garden.

Service Beyond the Post

During 1960-61, Keith Ruhn served as l0th District commander. Earlier, Wayne Seelhammer held that position in 1953-54, followed in 1954-55 as department vice-commander of the Eastern Region and served as department commander during the 1956-57 Legion year. The Post also has hosted several 10th District meetings.

Serving in the offices of the Cogswell Legion during this 75th year of our Post are Post Commander, Orville Gehring; Vice-Commander, Alfred Schreiner; Finance Officer, Bill Hayden; Adjutant, Richard Johnson; Historian, Randy Arneson, and Chaplain, Keith Ruhn. We have a 1994 membership of 58 veterans who have served their country in the various branches of the service and in many wars. These range from World War I to the Persian Gulf. The two remaining World War I veterans are Henry Kersting and Dwight S. “Barney” Zimmerley. Post 38 achieved its all-time high enrollment of 112 in 1958.

Post 38 Legionnaires are grateful to the Cogswell Auxiliary ladies for their loyalty and providing steady support to the Post in serving the community. The post holds regular meetings on the fourth Tuesday of each month.

Cogswell Auxiliary

Post 38 requested a charter for the Cogswell American Legion Auxiliary unit in February 1920. The charter was granted at the state and national levels in April 1925.

The unit, which consists of 53 members, is active in many areas. The ladies help the Legion with the Memorial Day program and dinner and assist the Post with Legion bingo and operating the concession stand at the Legion ball park. The unit sends two girls to Girls State annually, conducts Poppy Day and poppy poster programs and also supports the North Dakota Veterans Home at Lisbon, holding a party for the members there each year.

Serving in the offices of the Auxiliary unit are: President, Izetta Colvin; Vice-President, Ruth Glarum; Secretary, Marian Johnson; Treasurer, Lois Gehring and Chaplain, Virginia Even. The unit holds meetings regularly on the fourth Tuesday of each month.

Post 39 Velva ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 39, Joseph I. Weller Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Sixth District and located in Velva, North Dakota.

Charter

The Joseph I. Weller Post 39 received its national organizational charter on September 9, 1919.

Namesake

Named after Joseph Ira Francis Weller who was born at New Maysville, Indiana on February 12, 1893.  He was inducted at Towner, North Dakota on March 28, 1918.  He served overseas from June 21, 1918 until November 6, 1918 when he was Killed in Action.  He was buried at the American Cemetery in France.

Post 40 Mandan ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 40, Gilbert S. Furness Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Seventh District and located in Mandan, North Dakota.

Charter

The Gilbert S. Furness Post 40 received its national organizational charter on September 3, 1919.

Namesake

Gilbert Sessions Furness was born in Montpelier, Vermont on April 30, 1898.  He enlisted in Minneapolis, Minnesota on January 20, 1918.   The first Mandan soldier to make the supreme sacrifice, passing into the post everlasting at Camp Zachary Taylor, KY, at the age of 20. Sgt. Major Furness was a 1916 Mandan High School graduate.

History

Gilbert S. Furness Post 40 of Mandan has strived earnestly to carry out the programs of The American Legion.

The post was granted its charter on September 3, 1919, with 100 members on its scroll and has actively served for God and country continuously for 15 years. The first commander elected by the post members in 1919 was Hugo Renden, who died after a two-week illness, and was replaced as commander by John Kennelly. Major J.M. Hanley attended the early May 1919 St. Louis Caucus as a member of the temporary committee chosen to organize The American Legion in North Dakota. He also was selected to preside over the initial state convention at Bismarck Oct. 16-17, 1919. The first two delegates from Post 40 to attend that convention were H.K. Jensen and Earl H. Tostevin.

Post 40 derived its name in memory of Regimental Sgt. Major Gilbert S. Furness, the first Mandan soldier to make the supreme sacrifice, passing into the post everlasting at Camp Taylor, KY, at the age of 20. S

Programs

Since the Nov. 11, 1919, anniversary of the armistice, Post 40 has sponsored a “dugout” for all veterans each year on that special day. Members of the post host less fortunate veterans confined to private homes or nursing homes to allow them the opportunity to enjoy some camaraderie with their fellow comrades.

Leadership in Gilbert S. Furness Post 40 is evidenced by the plaque displaying the names of 20 Legionnaires of the Year. Further proof of leadership traits in the post are the members elected to national commissions, councils and offices. The Rev. James Tuxbury served as national chaplain. James Coats served a two-year term as alternate national executive committeeman.

The post has had three persons serving the state organization as department commander: First was John Kennelly, a charter member of Post 40, in 1928. In 1967, Harry A. Kautzmann was elected department commander, and in 1989 it was Jim Coats. These leadership qualities have trickled down into the post activities and the children and youth programs of The American Legion. North Dakota Boys State has elected boys sponsored by Post 40 as governors four times. Pat Williams was first in 1955, followed by Tom Brigl in 1977. Ten years later Ken Clouston received the honor and in 1990 Jason Clement was elected governor.

The Legion baseball program sponsored by Post 40 has hosted many baseball tournaments. The Mandan team has won the Jack Williams banner signifying the state champion of American Legion Baseball in 1964, 1965, 1970, 1990, 1991, 1993 and 1994. Post 40 has had three members elected to The American Legion Baseball Hall of Fame. They are Ed “Bosch” Froehlich, Boyd Jaskoviak and Lea Jablonski.

The first squadron commander of the Sons of The American Legion at Mandan and the first detachment commander in the state was Dwight C.H. Kautzmann, son of Past Department Commander Harry A. Kautzmann.

In 1980, Myrna Schlosser became the first woman veteran commander of Gilbert S. Furness Post 40.

Post 40 respects the recognition given to it for its many years of work in children and youth programs, which have resulted in numerous citations. The post’s annual kiddies’ Christmas party has added enjoyment for many youngsters in the community.

Americanism programs of the post include school flag presentations and patriotic school programs in which Legion members take an active part. The honor guard and firing squad consider it a privilege to serve at funerals of departed veterans and to present our nation’s colors at many community events, parades and memorial observances.

Post Home

Post 40 dedicated its current home after years of planning and deliberation by the building committee chaired by William G. Froehlich. Also on the committee were George Marback, Arthur Olson, William H. Helbling, Jacob Helbling, H.B. Uden, Eugene Dauenhauer, Maurice LaGrave and Leo Schwehr. Post commander at the time of the dedication was Pete Albrecht.

Another accomplishment of the post is the elevator installation, allowing easy access for elderly and disabled persons who frequent the club. This project took many hours and extensive funding. The elevator committee was formed in 1985 with George Marback, chairman. Serving also were Harry A. Kautzmann, Thomas Geiger, William Krueger, David McFerran and Post Commander Duane Schepp.

The elderly and disabled were greatly pleased when, in 1989, Post Commander Jim Coats, George Marback and Darrell McFarland, a disabled Legionnaire and member of Post 40, cut the ribbon making the Mandan Legion home completely accessible to one and all. This also enables Post 40 to offer handicapped accessibility to conferees when hosting district meetings and winter conferences.

Another addition to the Legion club in Mandan is the patriotic 7 x 21 -foot mural depicting the authentic emblems of the Air Force, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, Navy and Army. Completing this mural is a U.S. flag, the post Legion flag, and The American Legion emblem. All are on a background of land, sea and air, to coordinate the five branches of service and where they served. The mural was painted by Caroline Conrath, a Unit 40 member of The American Legion Auxiliary.

Post 41 Grafton ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 41, Grafton Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, Second District and located in Grafton, North Dakota.

Charter

The Grafton Post 41 received its national organizational charter on September 9, 1919.

Namesake

Was named after the city of Grafton.

History

The charter for Grafton Post 41 was issued on Sept. 9, 1919. The application was signed by these 15 WW I veterans: P. C. (Chubby) Baer, H. J. Brosnahan, J. E. Countryman, Phil Eastman, John H. Fraine, Henry C. Moe, Fred A. Moore, Fred T. Nelson, Manville J. Newgard, J. Gerhard Ofstedahl, Oscar D. Olson, Gilbert A. Opperud, Edwin F. Schumacher, Manville F. Sprague and Vernon H. Sprague.

Post Home

The post held its meetings on the second floor of the Armory Hall until 1928 when it leased the Woodman Hall for every Tuesday of the month. One Tuesday was sublet to the Legion Auxiliary and another Tuesday to the Fine Arts Club. The Grafton City Hall was built as a WPA project in 1938. The Legion contracted with the city for an extra room for $4,000. This Legion Hall was dedicated in February 1939.

With WW II veterans joining The American Legion, it became mandatory to find a newer and larger home. The property on Griggs Avenue between the post office and the telephone building was purchased and a grand opening was held for the new Legion Club and restaurant on July 1, 1950.

In the early 1970s, Post 41 purchased a lot from the State of North Dakota along Highway 17 West where the Heritage Village is today. In 1976 Ralph Adamsen traded the old Griggs Avenue building for the newly built LaHaise Building on East 8th Street. With the new gaming restrictions, with local population and membership declining, plus decreasing business, the Legion post became unable to meet its huge payments. The building was eventually sold and is now known as the Dakota Supper Club. Through an amiable arrangement with the new owners, the Legion is still using the facilities as before and has disposed all of its outstanding debts.

Programs

The post has always strived to maintain its obligation to the community, and many of its ventures became numerous and varied. One of the first projects for money making was the Saturday Night Dances conducted at the Armory. In 1931, the city purchased 80 acres of land east of Grafton from Willard Henrickson and received an easement from A. B. Thompson. This land is now known as the Fair Oaks Golf Course. The city gave the Legion permission to construct a bowery dance floor and charge five to ten cents for every dance, with concessions nearby. Weather proved to be quite a problem, either by rain outs or deterioration of the floor; so a tent known as the “Wigwam” was purchased to cover the entire dance floor. These pavilion dances began in 1930 but the Wigwam proved to be so much work that it was decided to sell the tent in 1936, and Saturday night dances were resumed at the Armory.

In the early 1920s, the Legion sponsored a Roller Rink for a short time. In 1931 the post initiated the High School Athlete of the Year Award, which program is still in operation after 64 years.

Post 41 has always sponsored Veterans Day, Memorial Day and July 4th holiday programs. In later years the July 4th celebration was dropped. In conjunction with the VFW post, all cemeteries in the area are visited by the Chaplain- offering closing prayers on Memorial Day. A program later is dedicated to the Honored Dead, with the Adjutant reading the Roll of Honor. Veterans Day is also observed in conjunction with the VFW.

In 1932 the first Legion Baseball team was started. That year the team played such towns as Cavalier, Pembina, Inkster, Park River, St. Michels, Neche and Aneta.

In 1957 Rinky Dink and Pee Wee baseball was also added to the program, with some years having between 200-300 boys playing during the vacation months. This program is still being sponsored by our Legion post after 63 years.

In 1934, the Legion helped some unemployed to join the CCC camps. Also in 1934, the Walsh County Legion Association was formed but was disbanded when WW II veterans were returning from service.

In 1938 and 1939, three boys were sponsored each year to the FFA Club National Convention at Kansas City.

Turkey raffles were held from 1935 until 1964 when bingo took over for money making projects. In 1977, baseball ticket parties were initiated but only after the city issued permits. In 1936 and 1937, Winter Skating Rinks were maintained by the Legion.

In 1938, the Boys State program was started and still is very much in operation today after 57 years. Also, in 1938, a Sons of The American Legion Squadron was organized at Grafton with 58 on the charter. It is believed that all of these members eventually entered military service during WW II, thereby dissolving the organization.

In 1939, the North Dakota Legion initiated the Oratorical Contest, and the local post participated as much as possible and as much as the local school system would put into the program.

In 1940, the Legion Firing Squad was organized, was in readiness for Memorial Day 1941 and today, over a half century later, is very active in providing ceremonial services in the community.

On Armistice Day 1944, Grafton Post 41 observed the 25th Anniversary of The American Legion with a program at the Masonic Temple. Past Commander Walter Knutson gave the main address, and the post’s membership that year was 144.

In 1957, the post began sponsorship of the Teen Age Canteen and proved to be very well received at the outset. On one night of the week, part of the Legion building was turned over to teenagers for their meeting place. The post also sponsored softball and bowling teams that year.

In 1956, two $100 scholarships were given to deserving seniors; this was raised later to $250 which is still in effect today.

In 1958, the post sponsored movies at the Strand Theatre for children during the Christmas shopping season and that program remains today. Also in 1958, the Legion post adopted the Clown Band and renamed it the Legion Band. These professional musicians performed for many activities including the state Legion convention and most parades in the area. The unit was in demand for entertainment.

In 1959, the post initiated the July 4th fireworks. A few years later the Auxiliary and the 40 et 8 joined in providing financial help, but the entire program was abandoned in 1973. In 1960, the post announced the purchase of more hospital beds, crutches and wheel chairs for use within the community. This program was enlarged later when joined with the forces of the VFW.

In 1964 the post spearheaded, under the chairmanship of Don Numedahl, a major statewide financial drive for the erection of an All-Faiths Chapel on the State School grounds. After six years, this very successful project culminated with the dedication of the $300,000 chapel on July 31, 1971. One of the main participants was Eunice Shriver, the sister of President John Kennedy.

In 1965, the post began sending students to International Music Camp, which continues today after 30 years. In 1974, the post donated $350 for the erection of the Carillon Bell Tower at the Peace Gardens.

The post co-sponsored Special Olympics from 1975 until the department took over this program in 1981. Also in 1975, the first Sugar Beet Festival took place in Grafton, and the post volunteered to take charge of the parade. Later, this responsibility was shared with the VFW.

The highest membership for WW I veterans was 122 in 1936. Post 41’s all-time high membership was attained in 1978 with 611. For 1994, our 75th year, we enrolled 361 members.

Post 42 Bottineau ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 42, Bottineau Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Sixth District and located in Bottineau, North Dakota.

Charter

The Bottineau Post 42 received its national organizational charter on September 2, 1919.

Namesake

Named after the city of Bottineau

History

On the front page of the Aug. 21, 1919, Bottineau Courant, a notice appeared issuing a call for all returned war veterans to gather at the Grand Theatre to organize a local American Legion post. Bottineau Post 42 was issued a charter on September 2, 1919, with 23 charter members. Monte Woods was elected the first post commander.

Early Programs

In September of 1919, the Bottineau Commercial Club quickly raised $1,500 from business and professional men and sponsored a celebration for returned servicemen. Many locals participated in the activities that were promoted for fun and entertainment: a competitive tug-of-war was held between the Army and Navy veterans, a parade was formed at the courthouse ending at the fairgrounds; a baseball game was played between Willow

City and Omemee, a motorcycle race entertained the group, with Oscar S. Thorson winning the $125 purse. Later, a public dance was held, which followed a free supper for all the servicemen, and the Grand Theatre, not to be outdone, showed three free Charlie Chaplin movies. During an intermission, 50 men signed up for the new post.

At the time the Legion was organized, some left-wingers challenged the group. They caused a few legionnaires to take an extreme opposite view when a motion was made at the 1919 national convention in Minneapolis to denounce A. C. Townley and the Non-Partisan League. Jack Sullivan, chief organizer of the Legion, declared that adopting this idea meant interfering in a political fight and the motion was defeated. To this day the Legion has refrained from partisan politics.

Post Home

In 1923, the post met in the Legion club rooms located on the second story of the Woods Emporium. After that, the Legion worked with the Bottineau County Commission to build and secure the present War Memorial Building for its use. This building, which for many years served both the Legion and its Auxiliary, included the Bottineau County Library. In 1937 the building was dedicated in conjunction with the Memorial Day service that spring. The parade was led by the Legion Drum and Bugle Corps, consisting of sons of Legionnaires. Glenn Swanson remembers being a member of that corps when World War II was declared.

Programs

In 1922, the post decided to raise funds for the Athletic Association so it sponsored a football team that challenged the local high school team. The Legion team, which consisted of Monte Woods, Ed Ertresvaag, Dick Costello, A. Ertresvaag, Nelson Ruelle, Dan McCaughna, Clarence Riley, N.D. Cameron, Mel Gorder and Bill Hunter, won the game 19-0.

From its inception Post 42 has sponsored or supported many worthwhile programs, especially strong 1in its concern for youth activities. Sponsoring boys to North Dakota Boys State over the years, the post also has generously contributed to International Music Camp scholarships and athletic programs. Post 42 very willingly has assisted in civic programs sponsored by other organizations and has cooperated with the Auxiliary in making the annual Memorial Day banquet a success.

After World War II, Post 42 began developing a youth baseball program in the community and fielded an American Legion team in 1947. Monte Woods coached the team from 1947 into the mid-1950s, and Alex Marsden was the team manager for many years. In respect for his leadership and dedication to youth and baseball, and upon the recommendation of Marsden and other Bottineau supporters, a league composed of Legion baseball teams in that area was formed in the early 1950s and was named after Monte Woods. Inclusive of The American Legions’ 75th year in 1994, the Bottineau post has provided splendid support for its baseball team continuously for nearly a half century and expects to continue that tradition into the future.

In recent years, the post has exchanged meetings and social get-togethers with the Boissevain neighbors in Canada. The membership of the Bottineau post has fluctuated since 1919, from its lowest point of 54 in 1933 to its highest of 316 in 1954. High membership records were tallied in the late 1940s through the 1970s, then slightly decreased in the 1980s and 1990s.

Our Legion post boasts 20 current members who have been Legionnaires for 50 years: Howard Boltz, Alex Brusven, August Buelow, Erling Freeman, Willard Dempsey, Leonard Marzolf, Oscar Moe, Bill Nero, Oscar Neumann, Phil Pfau, Loren Renick, Dale Rooe, Walter Tregen, Glenn Swanson, Lyle Steinmeir, Banks Sieber, Lloyd JellebergiAnton Jundt, Jack Stewart and Harvey Bdyer.

Bottineau Auxiliary

Application for charter was made February 6, 1921, and issued to the Bottineau American Legion Auxiliary Unit 42 on November 1, 1922. There were 21 charter members, 6 Gold Star Mothers and one adopted war orphan. The first officers included: Mrs. Kathleen Nero, president; Velva Campbell, vice president, and Rilla

Ertresvaag, secretary. Mrs. Nero became ill and Velva Campbell succeeded her as president. By Nov. 1, 1922, a quota of 54 members was reached. The unit met twice a month in the Commercial Club rooms; in 1933-34 the group met in the hall above the I.G.A. Store.

The Auxiliary recognized the need for a public library. With plenty of foresight and energy but little money, these determined ladies organized the American Legion Auxiliary Library in 1937. With a budget of $60 a year, these few interested workers first met in two small, dark basement rooms. Later, the husband of one lady donated a substantial amount of money for the library and it was moved upstairs to a large, more pleasant room.

They cut out stories from leading publications and bound them into books; they donated books; they bought children’s books from money gleaned from fines. They had countless library teas and other fundraisers to purchase books and items for the library. Eventually, the Auxiliary decided it no longer could fill the need and on June 27, 1980, the committee handed over the keys, books and all equipment to the new Bottineau County Library Board. These few women were a valiant crew!

Auxiliary members made a multitude of clothes, quilts, rolled bandages, and many more items for the American Red Cross.

They served lunches to the young men departing for military duty and later remembered them with cards and letters.

They supplied clothes to needy children, gifts and food to ex-servicemen and families in the city.

To raise funds for their work, they served all types of meals. A complete turkey dinner cost $1 a plate! They completely furnished their new kitchen and some items in the meeting room. They organized a Junior Auxiliary in 1931 and had 30 active members. They helped send boys to Boys State and since 1946, when

Girls State was organized; they sent one to three girls a year. They sent children to Camp Grassick, provided funds for and helped with “Cheer Boxes,” assisted with the Drum and Bugle Corps and had carnivals to raise funds.

Mrs. Tom Street was department president in 1938-39 and was national committeewoman in 1939-40. Several years ago the local unit had 118 members. They have had to move to different locations to meet after losing their “home.” They take an active part in all Auxiliary programs, providing funds, etc. They work hard at raising money and give many donations to school and community needs, as well as serving veterans in different homes and in our area. They also provide gifts and programs during the year for members in the Good Samaritan Nursing Home and the Bottineau Hospital

Post 43 Zahl ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 43, Wyatt E. Silker Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Ninth District and located in Zahl, North Dakota.

Charter

The Wyatt E. Silker Post 43 received it national organizational charter on September 22, 1919. The Post disbanded and the charter was cancelled May 17, 1928.

Namesake

Wyatt E. Silker was born in Babcock, Iowa on February 8, 1895.  He enlisted in Company E., 1st Infantry, North Dakota National Guard at Williston, North Dakota on April 30, 1917 and was called into Federal Service on July 15, 1917.  He served overseas from December 15, 1917 and was severely wounded on July 21, 1918 and was killed in action on October 1, 1918.  Among other awards and decorations, he was awarded the Silver Star.

History

Post Officers/Membership

Post YearCommanderAdjutantMembership
1919   
1919-20Erling L. AasgaardRalph E. Emery32
1920-21Ralph E. EmeryH. S. Simonson21
1921-22   
1922-23   
1923-24   
1924-25   
1925-26   
1926-27   
1927-28   
1928-29Charter Cancelled  

Post 44 Hunter ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 44, Albert W. Wallner Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, First District and located in Hunter, North Dakota.

Charter

The Albert W. Wallner Post 44, initially the Hunter Post 44, received its national organizational charter on September 2, 1919.

Namesake

Albert W. Wallner was born in Fairfax, Minnesota on January 1899.  He enlisted in the North Dakota National Guard in Fargo, North Dakota on August 3, 1917.  He served overseas from December 15, 1917 until he was Killed in Action on October 10, 1918 in France.  He was initially interred in the American Cemetery in France and later interred at New Ulm, Minnesota.  Among other awards and decorations, he was awarded the Silver Star.

Post 45 Carson ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 45, Walter J. Thome Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Seventh District and located in Carson, North Dakota.

Charter

The Walter J. Thome Post 45, initially Grant County Post 45, received its national organizational charter on September 2, 1919. On October 2, 1919 the Post changed their name to the Walter J. Thome Post 45.

Namesake

Walter John. Thome was born in Springhill, Minnesota on November 7, 1898.  He joined the North Dakota National Guard on March 12, 1917 in Mandan, North Dakota.  He served overseas in France from December 15, 1917 until he was Killed in Action July 19, 1918.  Among other awards and decorations, he was awarded the Silver Star. He was buried in the American Cemetery, Olse-Aisne, Aisne France

History

In the summer of 1919, a large group of World War I veterans in the Carson area organized an American Legion post. The was initially named the “Grant County Post 45” of The American Legion, Carson, ND, and received a temporary charter September 2, 1919. The original application for a charter, dated August 21, 1919, was signed by:

Theodore G. Allen, Carson

Eric G. Anderson, Brisbane

Paul M. Bell, Elgin

Clifford C. Campbell, Pretty Rock

Leonard F. Campbell, Pretty Rock

Harrison M. Carter, Carson

Wilbur R. Coffman, Fleak

Samuel Dering, Sr., New Leipzig

Chauncey B. Frost, Flasher

Gustave Haeske, New Leipzig

Clement D. Hayden, Brisbane

Mortimer M. Hayden, Brisbane

Leslie C. Herron, Leith

Theodore R. Johnson, Almont

Bert L. Jones, Carson

Frank L. Kahlert, New Leipzig

Vernon H. Lane, Carson

James L. Lee, Heil

Marquis S. McDowall, Carson

Frank C. Meyers, Carson

Ben Mooney, Carson

Christian F. Quast, Elgin

Albert M. Rendahl, Elgin

Jesse J. Roth, Carson

Gustave A. Ruana, New Leipzig

Max H. Shane, Carson

Robert D. Sprague, New Leipzig

Robert Sprecher, Odessa

Lorin S. Tower, Carson

Gottlieb R. Will, New Leipzig

Christian J. Zacher, Heil

Since the above name for the post was temporary, the post voted to change the name at its October 2, 1919, regular meeting to “Walter J. Thome Post 45” of Carson, ND, in honor of one of the local Grant County soldiers killed in action July 1918 in northern France. A permanent charter was issued Oct. 29, 1920. The post’s all-time high membership of 92, in 1920, included veterans from Grant County only.

After Flasher in October 1919, Shields in May 1920, New Leipzig in April 1921 and Elgin in February 1931 received charters, membership in the Carson post declined considerably, dropping to under 20 from 1937 through 1942. Returning World War II veterans again swelled the membership to 61 in 1946 and remained in the 40 to 50 range since.

Post Home

As the Legion post had no regular Carson home or meeting place, meetings were held in the courtroom of the Court House or in the City Hall. Many other Legion-sponsored activities were held in the local movie theater, especially on special occasions such as Memorial Day, fourth of July, Armistice Day (later renamed Veterans Day) and presidential holidays.

In 1955, the Grant Theater burned, leaving Carson without a place for local gatherings and activities. The American

Legion purchased the Modern Woodmen of America hall in Brisbane and moved it to Carson. A stage and a better entry were added. During the winter of 1955 and spring of 1956, work on the interior put on the finishing touches. We had a home of our own and we were in business!

Post Officers and Membership

Post YearCommanderAdjutantMembership
1919  70
1919-20Marquis S. McDowallLeslie C. Herron92
1920-21Marquis S. McDowallBert L. Jones30
1921-22Harrison M. CarterHarrison M. Carter30
1922-23John G. SeptHarrison M. Carter13
1923-24John G. SeptHarrison M. Carter33
1924-25John G. SeptOliver Tollefson21
1925-26Gustave A. RuanaC.H. Rodewald34
1926-27Oliver TollefsonVernon H. Lane23
1-27-28Theodore G. AllenVernon H. Lane27
1928-29Theodore MartellVernon H. Lane29
1929-30Theodore MartellVernon H. Lane21
1930-31Hilmer O. WolfgramVernon H. Lane38
1931-32Hilmer O. WolfgramVernon H. Lane27
1932-33Hilmer O. WolfgramJoel E. Stokes29
1933-34Hilmer O. WolfgramJoel E. Stokes22
1934-35Max H. ShaneTheodore Martell30
1935-36Max H. ShaneFloyd Steinmetz26
1936-37Edmund H. MorisetteFrank J. Ruemmele16
1937-38Frank J. RuemmeleFrank J. Ruemmele13
1938-39Edward KueblerFrank J. Ruemmele11
1939-40Vernon H. LaneReuben W. Sether16
1940-41Thorval T. OtterbergReuben W. Sether15
1941-42Thorval T. OtterbergMarquis S. McDowall15
1942-43Thorval T. OtterbergHarry F. Crandell22
1943-44Thorval T. OtterbergEverett A. Jacobs26
1944-45Erling LogelandEverett A. Jacobs28
1945-46Martin A. LandgrebeErling Logeland61
1946-47Robert BrastrupErling Logeland43
1947-48Reuben H. ZellerKenneth L. Stewart51
1948-49Reuben H. ZellerKenneth L. Stewart58
1949-50Reuben H. ZellerKenneth L. Stewart63
1950-51Ralph W. HansonKenneth L. Stewart47
1951-52Harvey L. HarperKenneth L. Stewart58
1952-53Andrew J. KleinB. Eugene DeLange38
1953-54Andrew J. KleinArthur H. Eggers57
1954-55Andrew J. KleinArthur H. Eggers45
1955-56Andrew J. KleinHarold W. Krause41
1956-57Arthur H. EggersAlvin M. Weekes43
1957-58Alexander P. MadisonAlvin M. Weekes30
1958-59Dale W. OzbunAnton K. Bruner46
1959-60Jack W. ChesrownMike L. Rambur50
1960-61Jack W. ChesrownReuben H. Zeller41
1961-62Dalles E. KrauseBruno F. Novak35
1962-63Dalles E. KrauseBruno F. Novak33
1963-64Eugene HeinzBruno F. Novak33
1964-65Frank Fischer Lorenz A. Landgrebe41
1965-66Frank FischerWillard A. Ketterling38
1966-67Frank FischerWillard A. Ketterling38
1967-68Frank FischerOrville W. Wahl39
1968-69Frank FischerOrville W. Wahl38
1969-70Frank FischerTheodore Riehl30
1970-71Frank FischerEverett M. Johnson41
1971-72Frank FischerEverett M. Johnson41
1972-73Frank FischerEverett M. Johnson42
1973-74David SokolofskyEverett M. Johnson46
1974-75David SokolofskyEverett M. Johnson46
1975-76Gary D. SkrettebergEverett M. Johnson46
1976-77Gary D. SkrettebergEverett M. Johnson46
1977-78Harold W. KrauseEverett M. Johnson51
1978-79Harold W. KrauseEverett M. Johnson46
1979-80Harold W. KrauseEverett M. Johnson48
1980-81Thomas W. ErskineEverett M. Johnson45
1981-82Thomas W. ErskineEverett M. Johnson43
1982-83Thomas W. ErskineEverett M. Johnson43
1983-84John D. ZellerEverett M. Johnson40
1984-85John D. ZellerEverett M. Johnson41
1985-86John D. ZellerEverett M. Johnson41
1986-87John D. ZellerEverett M. Johnson37
1987-88John D. ZellerEverett M. Johnson37
1988-89John D. ZellerEverett M. Johnson40
1989-90John D. ZellerEverett M. Johnson40
1990-91John D. ZellerEverett M. Johnson51
1991-92John D. ZellerVaughn Chesrown53
1992-93John D. ZellerRichard L. Hauck48
1993-94John D. ZellerRichard L. Hauck47
1994-95John D. ZellerHarold W. Krause48
1995-96  51
1996-97  58
1997-98  58
1998-99  60
1999-00  59
2000-01  62
2001-02  64
2002-03  65
2003-04  67
2004-05  66
2005-06  62
2006-07  66
2007-08  65
2008-09  60
2009-10  60
2010-11  55
2011-12  56
2012-13  50
2013-14  47

Grant County Veterans Memorial

In the spring of 1990, members of the post discussed the possibility of establishing a memorial to the men and women of Grant County who served in the armed forces of our country. The Board of County Commissioners granted approval to use an area east of the courthouse, provided that we assume responsibility for the construction and financing of the entire project as it had no funds available for such an undertaking. In the meantime, we began searching records to obtain a list of all veterans and to make plans and get estimates for the construction.

In 1992, the post began operating pull tab machines in local bars and voted to place 10 percent of funds collected for charities toward the financing of a memorial. Members of the governing board include: John D. Zeller – commander, Harold W. Krause – adjutant, Everett M. Johnson – finance officer, Bruce Parsons and Reuben H. Zeller- members-at-large. Over $70,000 has been distributed to various charities, local municipalities, schools and deserving organizations.

With the financial help of the Elgin, Flasher and New Leipzig American Legion posts, together with donations from individuals, the memorial is completed with over 1,600 names of men and women who served in the armed forces of this great country. We have included Civil War veterans who came north on Missouri riverboats as far as Mandan and Fort Abraham Lincoln and who homesteaded in the area that is now Grant County.

There also are several Spanish-American War veterans who were given homestead land as part of their service separation. Additionally, we have included present members of the North Dakota National Guard, many of whom are still serving in far-off places.

Carson American Legion Auxiliary

On April 17, 1926, a number of ladies met to organize the Walter J. Thome Unit 45 of The American Legion   Auxiliary. A charter was granted on June 21, 1926, with the following charter members:

Helen R. Allen, Carson

Adda Bell, Elgin

Adeline Bell, Elgin

Ella M. Bell, Elgin

Gwendolyn Bell, Elgin

Helen E. Bell, Carson

L. Pearle Carter, Elgin

Ann A. Daily, Carson

Blanche DeLange, Carson

Nettie Henderson, Carson

Anna M. Lane, Carson

Irene E. Lane .• Carson

Ida Kallis, New Leipzig

Viola Noyes, Carson

Sara Ruana, New Leipzig

Mildred F. Sept. Heil

Myrtis Shane, Carson

Effie Snook, Elgin

Elizabeth Stokes, Carson

Gladys Tollefson, Carson

Lydia Wolfgram, Carson

Membership in the Auxiliary remained rather small during the pre WW II era. Actually, no meetings were held during the years 1938 through 1942 because of dwindling membership. With the return of WW II veterans, activity picked up and the Auxiliary has been active since.

Post 46 Killdeer ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 46, Ezra Barrows Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Eighth District and located in Killdeer, North Dakota.

Charter

The Ezra Barrows Post 46 received its national organizational charter on September 2, 1919.

Namesake

The name of Ezra Barrows was selected since he was the second man from Dunn County to give his life for his country.  Ezra William Barrows as born in Chaanarnbie, Minnesota on March 18, 1896.  He enlisted in the North Dakota National Guard at Dickinson on July 14, 1917 and called into Federal Service on July 15, 1917.  He served overseas from December 15, 1917.  He was Killed in Action on May 7, 1918.  He was buried in France and reinterred at Lake Wilson, Minnesota.

History

The first annual soldiers’ reunion was sponsored by the City of Killdeer on May 30, 1919. All World War I servicemen and women, who were home at that time in Dunn County and the surrounding area, were invited to attend.

One of the features, of the day’s event was the parade of the veterans in uniform. The badge issued to each veteran on that long-ago day was a white silk ribbon 2-1/2 inches wide and 8 inches long with a replica of the flag of the United States.

Returning servicemen talked of forming a veterans’ organization during the summer of 1919. In a letter dated August 16, 1919, to the state office from C.A. Brown, he stated that a meeting of 25 ex-servicemen from the Killdeer area resulted in a desire to form an American Legion post and that, by the end of next week, they could have 100 members signed up out of a possible 200 eligible.

On August 21, 1919, an application for charter was completed and sent in to the state office. The name of Ezra Barrows was selected since he was the second man from Dunn County to give his life for his country. The first Dunn County man who died in action was Matthew Brew, member of Company K 164th Infantry, North Dakota National Guard. The Legion post in Dickinson is named for him. Twenty-nine names appeared on the charter which was issued on September 2, 1919.

Membership in tile post increased rapidly following its organization. Dodge, Halliday, Marshall, Ridgeway, Werner, Dunn Center, Killdeer, Oakdale, Manning, Fayette, Whetstone and Grassy Butte were well represented on the post roster.

A February 21, 1919 letter from the post adjutant to state headquarters requested application forms for a charter to establish a Ladies Auxiliary unit. This unit has been very active since its inception and is a vital factor in our community.

The January 1992 meeting of Ezra Barrows Post 46 of Killdeer was one of the most successful in its history. The Legion quarters were filled to the doors with the largest attendance in the history of the post with one exception. Delegations were present from Halliday, Werner, Dunn Center, Manning, Whetstone and Grassy Butte.

On Oct. 20, 1937, the Eighth District of the North Dakota American Legion broke all attendance records for the Missouri Slope Area When 410 Legionnaires attended the fall meeting in Killdeer.

Approximately two dozen Post 46 members participated with other Eighth District Legionnaires in a hunt that provided pheasants for the annual Armistice Day dinner in 1949 for the patients at the Fargo VA Hospital. In 1951, Post 46 sponsored the “Legion Follies of ’51” variety show that drew an enthusiastic audience of 600.

Post Home

The present Legion building in Killdeer was constructed in 1951. The mortgage burning ceremony was performed on October 15, 1963.

Programs

On November 1, 1965, the Legion voted to establish ambulance service; First aid training was initiated to train crews for this service. The first ambulance was a 1957 Dodge priced at $265 from war surplus. The American Legion continued to operate this service until 1994, when the Killdeer Area Ambulance Service took over.

Killdeer Legion membership has run from 120 to 140 over the last several years. The Killdeer post has an active Boys State and Girls State program as well as oratorical contests and the International Music Camp.

Post 46 has had strong support through the years from a great Auxiliary unit. Memorial Day and Veterans Day activities are always observed with a guest speaker, color guard, firing squad, Taps and a dinner by the Legion Auxiliary.

The post furnishes and places markers on the graves of veterans in several cemeteries and flags are put on these markers on Memorial Day. A color guard, firing squad and Taps are always provided for the military rites at the funerals of our veterans.

Through the years, other benevolences of The American Legion have been financial assistance for the Boys Scouts and the Girl Scouts, the free use of the Legion Hall for youth events and activities, Little League baseball at Dunn Center and Killdeer, the local senior citizens center, pee wee wrestling, coloring books for elementary students, Christmas for needy children and other worthwhile causes as presented. American Legion Post 46 is alive and doing well in Killdeer, North Dakota.

Post 47 Burnstad ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 47, Harry Hardy  Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Fifth District and located in Burnstad, North Dakota.

Charter

The Harry Hardy Post received its national organizational charter in September 2, 1919.  The Post disbanded and its charter was cancelled on June 15, 1925.

Namesake

Harry Merton Hardy was born in Winthrop, Minnesota on January 18, 1889.  He enlisted at Bismarck, North Dakota on September 17, 1917.  He was sent overseas on December 24, 1917.  He served in France and died on February 22, 1919 at Coblenz, Germany of pneumonia.  He was initially buried in Germany and was later buried in the Red Lake Cemetery, Burnstad, North Dakota.

History

Programs

In their Local Post Monthly Report, dated March 5, 1921; Post Commander Iner Pearson wrote the following under the Character of meetings and outline of business heading:

“On Oct. 22nd 1920 we gave a basket social which netted us about $50.00 and then in January 1921 we gave a dance which netted us about $45.00. With these proceeds we have purchased a “Rotospeed” duplicating machine and with this we are turning out copies of all bulletins and letters of general interest and mailing them to all members. We have acted on all your suggestions in regard to urging our legislators to support certain laws. We turned out letters to the respective legislators and mailed them to all members for signing and forwarding.” 

Membership

In their Local Post Monthly Report, dated March 5, 1921; Post Commander Iner Pearson wrote the following under the Criticism encountered in getting members heading: “There still is suspicion of The American Legion among Russians and Germans altho[ugh] it is largely overcome. We have one perspective member here.”

In addition to the above on the Post’s application for Permanent Charter, the following is recorded under paragraph 7, General Information:

“Out of the membership of twenty-two we have only twelve who are living here in the community. One in Richland, Wash[ington], one in Hankinson, No[rth] Da[kota], Avon, So[outh] Dak[ota], one in Bismarck, two in Lehr, No[rth] Dak[ota], one in Wis[consin], one in Grand Forks, one in Pollock, and one in Fredonia, No[rth] Dak[ota]. This puts the Post in a very difficult position as it is difficult to get many out to a meeting.”  

Post Officers/Membership

Post YearCommanderAdjutantMembership
1919   
1919-20A. V. NordquistNo Record22
1920-21Iner PearsonC. W. Mauck16
1921-22Post Disbanded  

Post 48 Bowman ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 48, Frank Gordhamer Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Eighth District and located in Bowman, North Dakota.

Charter

The Frank Gordhamer Post 48 received its national organizational charter on September 3, 1919.

Namesake

Frank Gordhamer apparently died following his service in WWI.

On August 15, 1919, ex-servicemen in Bowman County met in the I.O.O.F. Hall in Bowman to organize an American Legion post. These men felt that history of the war should be preserved and, having found strength for America abroad, it was felt they should band together to keep America strong at home. They named the post after a young Bowman County man who had died in World War I, so it became known as Frank Gordhamer Post 48. They adopted a constitution. A special meeting was held September 20, 1919, to elect a delegate to the State Meeting at Fargo. A membership drive was conducted September 15-20 to sign up as many new members as possible in an effort to help boost the strength of The American Legion to one million members nationally.

History

On Oct. 11, 1919, two delegates – Curtis Sampson and M.S. Byrne- and two alternate delegates – O.H. Johnson and J.O. Lee – were elected to attend the state convention October 16-17 at Bismarck. A committee was selected to plan the entertainment during the winter months. As of October 1, 1919, membership in the post was 57, of which 31 were charter members.

The stockholders of Bowman Publishing voted to donate their stock in the company to the Legion, as well as the property of the Old Citizens Building on Main Street which, to this day, is the same building at the same address. The Legionnaires proceeded to make the building ready for occupancy, and dances were the main entertainment sponsored by the post.

The Legion was very active, dues of $3 a year were assessed and a committee met the trains arriving with veterans coming home. As the servicemen stepped from the train, they were invited to join The American Legion and share in veterans’ projects conducted by the Legion post.

Early in 1920, The American Legion Auxiliary was organized and is still active in the community.

Early in 1921, the Legion clubrooms were nearly completed, most of the furniture had arrived and the Legionnaires were rightly proud of the remodeled, redecorated quarters. The property and fixtures had a value of about $3,000 and the post was free from debt!

Through all of the years, Frank Gordhamer Post 48 has been most active in many different ways, such as putting on plays, having a smoker, which became an annual affair, sending youth to Boys State, the Auxiliary sponsoring girls to Girls State, baseball teams, track meets and dances at the Legion Hall were well attended.

A Crusade for Freedom was held in 1950, with the Legion, VFW and the Elks Lodges of North Dakota participating. “Freedom Scrolls” and other material had arrived, and the First National Bank in Bowman was named for the signing of the scrolls. There was great interest in obtaining signatures from as many residents in the area as possible. The scrolls with the signatures were enshrined in the Freedom Bell in Berlin, Germany, at the closing of the nationwide crusade. Contributions were welcome with the signatures, and 23,000 signatures and $3,500 in contributions were the result of the crusade in North Dakota.

It should be mentioned that the first officers elected 1919 were Dr. A.A. Whittemore, commander; Frank C. James, vice-commander, M.S. Byrne, adjutant; Charles Hook, historian; O.H. Johnson, finance officer and C.A. Sampson, chaplain.

The officers elected and serving in 1994 were Norman L. Siverson, commander; Kayo Isaak, vice-commander; Virgil Zahn, vice-commander; Reuben Pladsen, adjutant; Bob Craig, finance officer; Aileen Doyle, historian; Fred Gerth, chaplain, Edwin Peters, sergeant-at-arms, and Harold Schuh, service officer.

In 1953, Post 48 established its high membership of 183. During the past two decades, the post’s membership has ranged between 145 and 170. Space does not allow telling about all the years since Post 48 was organized, but we do appreciate all the work Legionnaires have performed in the past and the many beneficial services the organization of The American Legion has provided to the Bowman community. We also thank the living members for their dedication to the welfare of their organization. They helped to make Frank Gordhamer Post 48 a success through the years.

The Mounted Color Guard of Post 48 led the Bowman Bicentennial Celebration Parade July 4, 1976. Prior to the mid-1970’s these Legionnaires marched in parades, and then began riding because it was not only easier for them but also they became more effective attention-getters.

Post 49 Garrison ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 49, Hugh P. Minehan Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Fifth District and located in Garrison, North Dakota.

Charter

The Hugh P. Minehan Post 49 received its national organizational charter on September 3, 1919.

Namesake

Hugh P. Minehan who was born in 1893, entered Army service in 1917 and was killed Nov. 11, 1917. He died of wounds in the Argonne Forest in France. 

History

Charter members of the post were John F. Gates, Claude E. Miners, Kenneh B. Burns, Elmer Voracek, Elmer DeHaven, R.G. Abelein, Carl E. Hacanson, Harry J. Boyer, Sidney McElwain, Peter A. Karlson, Joseph Bentley, William Walters, Ralph C. Anderson, Kenneth Knapp and William A. Roehm.

The first Post Commander (1919-20) was Elmer DeHaven. The first Adjutant was William A. Roehm. The post was defunct during 1922-23 but was reorganized in 1924.

On March 6, 1924, the ladies Auxiliary to The American Legion was chartered with 20 members. Charter members of the Auxiliary were Mrs. H.T. Burns, Mrs. K. Burns, Miss Alice Hagen, Mrs. F. Ireland, Miss Marie Malloy, Mrs. C.A. Metz, Miss Alice Minehan, Miss Inez Miners, Mrs. Biglow Neil, Mrs. H.G. Piper, Mrs. T. Robinson, Mrs. William Robinson, Mrs. O. Schneider, Mrs. C.E. St. George, Mrs. L.E. Tibbs, Mrs. Sadie Van Cleve, Sadie Florence Van Cleve, Mrs. E.L. Vorachek, Mrs. E.E. Tibbs, Mrs. E.E. Wacker and Mrs. R. Yonker. The first president of the Auxiliary was Mrs. H. T. Burns.

The last surviving charter member of the post was Peter A. Karlson who died in 1922 at age 102. The last surviving charter member of the Auxiliary was Mrs. E. L. Voracek who died in 1994 at 101 years of age.

The 1920s and 1930s were struggling years, sponsoring dances for every holiday to create some income to keep up with department and national Legion programs plus the local programs sponsored by the post. The Legion post and the Auxiliary unit associated together in working for all projects such as child welfare, health and education, rehabilitation, Americanism, civil defense, foreign relations, poppy sales, Boys State, Girls State, oratorical contest, music camp, Veterans Hospital, Veterans Home and many school programs.

During the 1933-35 years, many meetings were held on flood control, tree planting, soil erosion and parks for 11 states from North Dakota and Minnesota to Texas. Work was done by the new Civilian Conservation Corps. Surveys showed the location of 197 proposed projects such as dams, tree planting, parks and road building. Many American Legion posts were very active in promoting the projects. The Conservation Chairman for Post 49 was N.S. Phillips, a past post commander. Veterans’ preference was given to single men 18 to 25 years of age in manpower hire for the Civilian Conservation Corps to complete assigned projects.

In March I945, a trust agreement of the members of Hugh P. Minehan Post 49 and the Garrison Golf Club was instituted for furnishing and maintenance of a building (Stone Inn) to be used as the Legion clubrooms. The sum of the agreement was $200.

As a strong supporter of American Legion Baseball, the post erected eight light towers and installed the lighting system. In I957, under Commander Jack Williams, it was decided to build a new clubhouse. The vote was 37 yes, 1 no. Successful bidders were: general contractor – John Torske; plumbing – Underwood Plumbing; heating and ventilation –Western Sheet Metal; electrical – Bayer Electric. Cost of the clubhouse was $73,000.

The ladies Auxiliary furnished the kitchen.

January 13, 1958, became a historic date – dedication of the long-sought new American Legion clubrooms at Garrison. H. G. Piper, a past commander of Post 49 and a past department commander, Minot, presented highlights of the early years. Department Commander Earnest N. Schmit of Beach gave the dedicatory address.

Another great event, on April 11, 1964, was the mortgage burning ceremony conducted by Post Commander Kenneth Hopkins.

In the 1920s the World War I vets started a sausage supper that has become an annual affair held close to Veterans Day.

Post 49 enrolled an all-time high of 259 members in 1976, the year in which we celebrated our nation’s bicentennial.

Since WW II our post has had 20 years of 200-plus member enrollments, holding steady at 220 members in 1994.

In 1985, a group of Legionnaires started a voiture of the 40&8 at Garrison, called the McLean County Voiture 187. Dick Rasch was the first chef de gare elected to head that organization.

For the 36 years between dedication in 1958 and The American Legion’s 75th anniversary in 1994, Garrison’s American Legion clubrooms and meeting facilities have served the post and community very well. The 50’x80′ structure includes a 25’x60′ meeting room, lounge, modern kitchen and store room on the main floor and a full basement. In addition to Legion and Auxiliary events, this building is used frequently by other groups for local and area activities.

Post 50 Golden Valley ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 50, Sabra R. Hardy Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Seventh District and located in Golden Valley, North Dakota.

Charter

On August 15, 1919, David Schwartz met with other local Golden Valley veterans to organize an American Legion Post. The Sarbra R. Hardy Post received is initial national organizational charter on September 9, 1919. The Post disbanded and its charter was cancelled on May 6, 1932. The Post reorganized and was issued a second national charter on September 24, 1946. It subsequently disbanded and its charter was cancelled on August 30, 1953.

Namesake

Sabra R. Hardy

She had enlisted in the Army. Served during World War I. She had the rank of Enlisted. Occupation or specialty was Nurse. Served with 54th Base Hospital. Hardy experienced a critical situation which resulted in loss of life on October 4, 1918. Sabra R Hardy is buried or memorialized at Plot B Row 26 Grave 9, St. Mihiel American Cemetery, Thiaucourt, France. COMMENDATIONS★ Nurse Corps Badge★ World War I Victory Medal

History

Post Officers/Membership

Post YearCommanderAdjutantMembership
1919   
1919-20David SchwartzJ. H. Isaak46
1920-21David SchwartzJ. H. Isaak 
1921-22Peter BalogC. C. Nunn 
1922-23S. M. FrankC. C. Nunn 
1923-24E. M. MoeJ. H. Isaak 
1924-25J. H. IsaakA Sayler 
1925-26Post Disbanded  
    
1946-47Richard W. LinkHilmer Quast27
1947-48Richard W. LinkHilmer Quast18
1948-49Harold KieszDelton Weigum17
1949-50Harold KieszDelton Weigum24
1951Post Disbanded  

Post 51 Reeder ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 51, Carl Hendrickson Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Eighth District and located in Reeder, North Dakota.

Charter

The Carl Hendrickson Post 51 received its national organizational charter on September 11, 1919.

Namesake

Carl Hendrickson-No further information available.

Post 52 Mohall ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 52, George Thomas Taylor Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Sixth District and located in Mohall, North Dakota.

Charter

The George Thomas Taylor Post 52 received its national organizational charter on September 11, 1919.

Namesake

George Thomas Taylor was born in Rapid city, South Dakota on March 23, 1893.  He was inducted into the Army at Mohall, North Dakota on March 29, 1918.  He arrived overseas from May 3, 1918 until he was Killed in Action on October 2, 1918.  He was buried at the American Cemetery, Meuse-Argonne France.

Post 53 Ashley ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 53, Frank Piper Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Fifth District and located in Ashley, North Dakota.

Charter

The Frank Piper Post 53 received its national organizational charter on September 15, 1919.

Namesake

Frank Jabez Piper was born July 16, 1887 in Adams County North Dakota.  He was inducted at Hettinger, North Dakota on March 9, 1918.  He served overseas in France from August 15, 1918 until his death from pneumonia on October 9, 1918.  He was originally buried in France and returned to the United States on August 8, 1921 in buried at Ashley, North Dakota.

Post 54 Linton ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 54, Dan R. Richardson Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Fifth District and located in Linton, North Dakota.

Charter

The Dan R. Richardson Post 54 received its national organizational charter on September 15, 1919.

A meeting of about 35 veterans who returned home after World War I was held July 3, 1919, at the Linton Opera House for the purpose of forming an American Legion post. Because of that meeting, Dan R. Richardson Post 54 officially organized September 15, 1919, and was granted National Charter 2416. Charter members were F.B. Streeter, O.T. Becker, A.B. Becker, B.T. Green, Gilman Hanson, Henry Bader, K.E. Ponath, R.R. Hogue, E.M. Graf, Jos. J. Weber, P.H. Marshall, L.F. Stewart, H.C. Lynn, Fred Kremer and G. Rooks.

Namesake

Dan R. Richardson was the first Emmons County serviceman to die during WW I. He died of pneumonia at Camp Dodge, Iowa, Feb. 6, 1918, and was interred in the Linton City Cemetery Feb. 8, 1918.

History

Post Home

Meetings were held on the second floor of the Stone Drug Store for many years. Because the post was a countywide organization, some meetings during those years were held in other towns within the county.

In 1934, when the present Emmons County Courthouse was constructed, funds that had been raised for a War Veterans Memorial were utilized and the Memorial Auditorium was added. At that time, an area designated as the Legion Rooms was set aside for the exclusive use of the post and its Auxiliary. Funds were raised to furnish and equip this area, and it has been the headquarters of the Legion and the Auxiliary since that time.

Service Beyond the Post

The following members of Dan R. Richardson Post 54 have gone on to higher offices in The Ametican Legion:

Frank B. Streeter, 1923-24 department commander and 1924-25 national executive committeeman; Harry Linn, 1929-30 department vice-commander; Willard W. Brandt, 1954-55 department vice-commander, after which he was elected to serve the following 1959-60 year as national vice-commander, and Rev. Charles Meyer, 1964-65 department chaplain.

Six Linton Legionnaires have served as district commander, including Lynn in 1928-29 and Brandt in 1953-54. The other four are Curtis B. Jenkins 1940-41, Ralph Schmaltz 1960-61, Tony Goetz, 1977-78 and Joe Bosch 1992-93.

Membership

The present membership in Post 54 is well over 200 and consists of World War II, Korean, Vietnam and Desert Storm veterans. Many of these veterans are always present at the regular meetings of our post.

Programs

The American Legion is a national organization with posts in the 50 states and several foreign countries. It is dedicated to uphold and defend the Constitution of the United States; to foster and perpetuate a one hundred per cent Americanism; to instill a sense of individual obligation to the community, state and nation; to promote peace and good will; to safeguard and transmit to posterity the principles of justice, freedom and democracy; to secure and safeguard the rights and benefits of veterans.

Dan R. Richardson Post 54 has met these obligations through many local projects, such as sponsoring American Legion and Babe Ruth baseball, Boys State – a week-long exercise in government- oratorical contests for high school students, Easter Egg Hunt Day, Santa Claus Day and local Boy Scouts program.

The post has also provided a post service officer for veterans and their dependents.

The post was instrumental in getting an Emmons County service officer appointed on a steady basis. The post has sponsored Veterans Day programs and functions and has an annual Memorial Day program, which has been rated as one of the top programs in the state. The post also assists at the time of the death of a veteran, participates in military funerals, and supports adequate legislation for the benefit of veterans, both on the state and national levels. The post’s responsibility to the community has been fulfilled by all of the foregoing and by participating in many other local programs and projects.

Ten of 14 World War I veterans honored by Dan R. Richardson Post 54 at Linton during a combined 50th Anniversary and 1968 Veterans Day observance were: Louis Krumm, Hague; Anton W. Bosch, Linton; Martin F. Schall, Hague; Harry C. Lynn and Lester E. Koeppen, Linton, Dr. Herman J. Bertheau, Anton L. Holzer and William A. Schmierer, all of Linton; Armand A. Blanc, Strasburg, and John D. Meier, Linton. The 10, plus four members who were unable to be present, were presented life memberships in the post. Not present were Fred Kremer, Bismarck; Edward Renschler, Fred Petrie and Curtis B. Jenkins, all of Linton. Post Commander John Dykema presented the life membership awards, and Past Post Commander Al Schaible was master of ceremonies.

Linton Wins First State Legion Baseball Championship in 1928

Linton’s Dan R. Richardson Post 54 sponsored North Dakota’s first state championship American Legion Baseball team in 1928. Members of that team were: Tony Yolk, Anton Heisler, George Schmidt, Lawrence

Vetter, Alfred Pfeifer, Philip Lipp, Darwin Fogle, Ralph Haugse, Joe Martin, Alvin Dockter, Chuck Wood, Pug Graf, Eddie Kruger, Harold Dobler and kneeling, center front, Mascot “Chub” Kruger. Back row: Harry C. Lynn, manager; Earl Wood, coach, and Ed Kruger, assistant coach.

Linton Legion Auxiliary Unit

The sister and companion unit of The American Legion at Linton was organized under National Legion Charter 2416 on August 8, 1922, with the name of Dan R. Richardson Unit 54. The unit charter was dated February 19, 1923.

Charter members were Sophie Wagner, Lucy Paulson, Mrs. Peter Shier, Minnie Chaney, Verda Richardson, Irene Irvine, Mrs. John Schlangen, Ruth Schlangen, Mrs. John Bader, Theresa Streeter, Ellen Bader, Jennie Seeley, Asiar Becker, Emma Heinrich, Ethel Turner and Mrs. Henry Wittmayer.

Being an adjunct to the Legion, the Auxiliary subscribes to the same purposes. On the state level, the Girls State program is supported entirely by Auxiliary finances. Scholarships and welfare of children and youth are an important part of its program, as is the aid to veterans in hospitals. A sale of its official flower – the poppy – is made each Memorial Day, these flowers having been made and purchased from disabled veterans of North Dakota.

Locally, one of the most important projects was the founding in 1937 of the Linton Public Library, which continues to receive financial support each year. The Auxiliary also contributes to the Girls Scouts of Linton.

Membership is open to wives, mothers, sisters, daughters and granddaughters of Legion members and those who died on active duty in the U.S. armed forces.

Post 54 Commanders

Post YearPost Commander
1919F.B. Streeter
1920-21A.H. Irvine
1921-22Lester Schlangen
1922-23F.B. Streeter
1923-24A.D. Tough
1924-25W.K. LaPaugh
1925-26A.E. Becker
1926-27Harry C. Lynn
1927-29Curtis Jenkins
1929-31Henry Bader
1931-32Earl Corner
1932-33L.E. Koeppen
1933-35Harry C. Lynn
1935-36Curtis Jenkins
1936-38William N. Herred
1938-39Albert L. Paine
1939-40Curtis Jenkins
1940-42William Schmierer
1942-46Dr. Herman J. Bertheau
1946-47Robert Chesrown
1947-48Theodore Bertsch
1948-49Dr. Albert Wenzel
1949-51Ben A. Meier
1951-52Les Renschler
1952-53Albert Gimbel
1953-54Edwin W. Heilman (Part)
1953-54Peter A. Kraft (Part)
1954-55Raymond Volk (Part)
1954-55Ben Ramey
1955-56Terry Lawler
1956-57Ralph Schmaltz
1957-58Edward Wagner
1958-59Peter Silbernagel
1959-60Larry M. Hatch
1960-61George Paul
1961-62Lloyd Hollister
1962-63Willard W. Brandt (Part)
1962-64William Fischer
1964-65Al Schaible
1965-66Robert Gaukler
1966-67Matt Schneider
1967-68Victor Schiermeister
1968-69John V. Dykema
1969-70Pius Engelhardt
1970-71Bob Starr
1971-72Alvin Lipp
1972-73Leo Kramer
1973-75Peter Silbernagel
1975-76Anton Goetz
1976-77John W. Werner
1977-78Martin Schumacher
1978-79Alex Ohlhauser
1979-80Henry Rohrich
1980-82Francis Lawler
1982-83Tom Bosch
1983-84Sebastian Schumacher
1984-85Michael Wickenheiser
1985-86Rodney Jahner
1986-87Pius Rohrich
1987-90Joe Bosch
1990-91Leonard Feist
1991-93Wayne Jahner
1993-94Mike Jacob

Post 55 Amidon ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 55, John Kienenberger Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Eighth District and located in Amidon, North Dakota.

Namesake

John George Kienenberger was born in Belmond, Iowa on January 28, 1888.  He was inducted at Amidon, North Dakota on March 29, 1918.  He served overseas in France from May 3, 1918 until he was killed in action on September 27, 1918.  His final resting place is unknown.

History

Charter

The John Kienenberger Post 55 received its temporary national organizational charter on September 15, 1919 and applied for its permanent charter in May 1921. The veterans who signed Post 55’s application for a temporary charter on September 9, 1919 are: Glintont G. Harkins, T. A. Johnson, C. I. Ware, H. R. Hommedal, Elmer Clark, C. H. Largis, Sig Homelvig, Melvin J. Homelvig, G. E. Eaton, Gerald Livingston, John L. Webster, Joseph J. Saddler, Alfred Sunden, Thomas Hiner, and Victor G. Henk. Due to a lack of members, the Post disbanded and its charter was cancelled on June 15, 1925.

Post Membership

The John Kienenberger Post 55 began with 52 members enrolled in 1920. The Post’s transmittal sheets to Department reflect the residences of these members have addresses in numerous towns—many are no longer on the North Dakota map. A breakdown of these residences is as follows:

ResidenceNumber of MembersResidenceNumber of Members
Amidon20Rainy Butte1
Bowman5Beirman3
New England1Bessie1
Reeder1Mineral Springs1
Marmarth1Out of State 
Belfield2Dupree, SD1
Rhame1Samuels, Idaho1
Slope Center7Hibbing, MN1
Midway4Chalk Buttes, MT1

Post Officers/Membership

Post YearCommanderAdjutantMembership
1919   
1919-20T. A. JohnsonG. D. Eaton52
1920-21T. A. JohnsonG. D. Eaton39
1921-22T. A. JohnsonG. D. EatonNo Record
1922-23Anton FickerG. D. Eaton12
1923-24Post Disbanded  

Post 56 Goodrich ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 56, Albert Block Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Fourth District and located in Goodrich, North Dakota.

Charter

The Albert Block Post 56 received its national organizational charter on October 8, 1919.

Namesake

Albert Block was born in Spencer, Nebraska on February 27, 1895.  He was inducted at McClusky on May 25, 1918.  He served overseas in France from August 11, 1918 until he was killed in action on September 26, 1918.  He is buried at the Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery France.

History

On September 29, 1919, a letter was sent to Jack Williams, state secretary of The American Legion, requesting application to charter an American Legion post at Goodrich. The post was to be named Albert Block in honor of the first serviceman from Goodrich killed while fighting on the battlefields of France.

On Oct. 8, 1919, a charter was issued to Goodrich and from that time on this post has been known as Albert Block Post 56 of Goodrich. The charter members for this new organization were Charles Gray, Thomas P. Fay, Carl F. Olsen, Clarence 0. Kittelson, A.D. McKinnon, Francis F. Payseno, Fred M. Maas, John Wiersch, Everett LaValley, Raymond E. Doering, Richard Doering, Edward Mauch, John J. Kraemer, John T. Ashley, Arlie J. Knipper, Cleo Payseno and Christ C. Olson. The first officers were: A.D. McKinnon, commander; Thomas Ashley, vice-commander; Edward Mauch, adjutant; Richard Doering, finance officer; John Wierch, chaplain and Charles Gray, sergeant-at-arms.

Committees were appointed to get more members and to complete the draft of the post constitution and by-laws. These were patterned after similar constitutions and by-laws used by other posts in the state and were adopted October 30, 1919.

Post Home

In a letter, dated Jan. 19, 1920, to Jack Williams it is stated that the post bought the present-day building from a stock company for $6,000. The building was lost to foreclosure proceedings in 1924. The reason was not given. It was about this time that the Knights of Pythias Lodge got ownership of the building. We then held our meetings in different places in town, mostly at the City Library which adjoined the Fire Hall.

Now comes a change in the faces of the Legion, with the World War II veterans returning home. We carried on like this until 1951 when the school district wanted to build a new gym. After many meetings with the school board, the Legion post agreed to release their interest in the Veterans Memorial Fund for a meeting room in the new gym. This was granted and we fixed it up with a new kitchenette and lunch counter.

We held our business and social meetings there until some of our members overstepped the rules that had been laid down. Then we were politely asked to leave because the school needed the room. So this left us with the problem of finding a new home again. Having very little money, we still were looking for buildings rather than trying to build. When we approached the K.P. Lodge, they were happy to sell the building because their membership had dwindled to almost nothing. So we ended up with our original home for $1,500.

The building was somewhat in need of repair but it was ours. Over the years, we have replaced heating plants and wiring, and we also have done some remodeling. Now we have a fairly nice home. This is a big improvement from our first meeting place, which was a little printing shop in Goodrich.

Memorial Program

In 1955, we ordered white helmets, gloves, belts, leggings, etc., to dress up our squad for funerals and special ceremonies. Ironically, the first funeral for which we used our new equipment was for the Legionnaire who started the drive. Also in 1955, the post leased a drive-in theatre from this man’s widow and operated it for that reason. We also operated a walk-in blood bank, with 200 people having their blood typed and on call for blood donations.

In 1958, we started the project of building a memorial plot in the local cemetery to honor our fallen veterans. The city fathers sold us four cemetery lots for $1 for this project. Corner markers of granite, l2″x 12″ with Legion emblem engraved on them, mark the boundary. A main plaque in a monument 3’x5’x10″ thick with a rounded top and topped with a cross is centered in our lot. At the head of the monument is a flag on a 20-foot pole. A field of 18 white crosses completes the memorial plot, which is the site of our Memorial Day ceremonies. Since 1958, flags on 18-foot poles have been added for each fallen veteran. To date, we have 85 flags flying on Memorial Day. A name for each deceased veteran is attached to each pole.

Post Programs

Over the years, we have sponsored many activities such as: Boys State, music camp, Boy Scouts and many ball teams. We have supported many school projects, dances, movies, roller skating, smokers (when allowed), bingo and pull tabs, and many other community functions. We ordered our first post banner and colors March 18, 1921.

Isaac Allen, our last World War I veteran, was laid to rest March 7, 1984.

Post 57 Kulm ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 57, Robert Kurtz Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, Tenth District and located in Kulm, North Dakota.

Charter

The Robert Kurtz Post 57 received its national organizational charter on September 22, 1919.

Namesake

Robert Kurtz was born in Kulm, North Dakota on April 2, 1896.  He was inducted at Hillsboro on June 24, 1918 and sent to Camp Dodge, Iowa where he served in the 163rd Depot Brigade Air Service.  He died of pneumonia at Fort Wayne, Michigan on October 12, 1918 and is buried at Kulm, North Dakota

Post 58 Marath ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 58, Dovie Carter Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Eighth District and located in Mararth, North Dakota.

Charter

The Dovie Carter Post 58 received its national organizational charter on September 22, 1919. Due to lack of membership, the Post disbanded and its charter was cancelled on June 15, 1925.

Namesake

Dovie Carter was born in Springfield, Illinois on September 10, 1893.  He was inducted at Minot, North Dakota on July 25, 1918 and served overseas with the 638th Aero Squadron from December 18, 1917 until his death on December 6, 1918.  He is buried at the American Cemetery, Meurthe-et-Moselle, France.

History

Post Officers/Membership

Post YearCommanderAdjutantMembership
1919   
1919-20Earnest J. KruegerChester Allison48
1920-21Earnest J. KruegerChester Allison21
1921-22Post Disbanded  

Post 59 Hamilton ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 59, Maurice D. Rowe Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, Second District and located in Hamilton, North Dakota.

Charter

The Maurice D. Rowe Post 59 received its national organizational charter on September 22, 1919.  The Post disbanded and the charter was cancelled on June 15, 1925.

Namesake

Maurice D. Rowe was born February 3, 1892.  He was inducted at Cavalier, North Dakota on March 29, 1918.  He served overseas in France from May 3, 1918 until he was killed in action on October 1, 1918.  He is buried at the American Cemetery, Meuse-Argonne France.

Post 60 Valley City ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 60, Edgar A. Fisher Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Easter Region, First District and located in Valley City, North Dakota.

Charter

The Edgar A. Fisher Post 60 received its national organizational charter on October 2, 1919.

Namesake

The post was named after a well-known Barnes County boy, Edgar A. Fisher who was born in Valley City, North Dakota on October 21, 1889.  He was called into active service on November 27, 1917 as a 1st Lieutenant.  He held a mining engineering degree and was commissioned at Ft. Ogelthorpe, GA. He served overseas in France from March 30, 1918 until his death on July 1, 1918 when he drowned in the Marne River while in command of a detail to capture prisoners across the river.  He was initially buried in France and letter interred at the Woodbine Cemetery in Valley City.

History

Edgar A. Fisher Post 60 of The American Legion at Valley City came into being through the efforts of a group of World War I veterans. The organizational meeting was held in the City Hall at Valley City September 27, 1919, with 100 veterans in attendance. Maj. D. S. Ritchie initiated the movement. Col. Frank White acted as chairman and Lt Col. R. J. McDonald was acting adjutant of the organizing group.

Charter Officers

The post was chartered October 2, 1919. The first slate of officers was D. S. Ritchie, commander; Frank Beal, Jr., vice commander; R. J. McDonald, adjutant; Fred J. Federickson, historian; C. R. Simpson, finance officer, and Palmer Enerson, chaplain. The post’s 15 members who signed the charter application were Ritchie, McDonald, White, Theodore S. Henry, Ross G. Wills, Leo D. Ferguson, C. W. Ferguson, S.M. Cleven, Cliff McDonald, B. V. Lippold, C. F. Mudgett, Neal H. Tracy, Bernard 0. Swanson, Tom Grodem and Ole Brandvold.

Post Homes

For the first few years, the post meetings were held in various buildings in the city until 1937 when the present Post 60 home was built on East Main Street. Gus Lybeck was club manager, who held this position until his death in the late 1940s; then Andy Matson followed as manager for over a decade.

Post Programs

The Legion sponsored many athletic events, including baseball and basketball. In 1930, American Legion baseball became an on-going sponsored program in our community. During this era also, the Valley City American Legion Drum and Bugle Corps was organized under the direction of Adrian Pfusch and functioned until WW II when travel restrictions and other factors dictated that the unit suspend operations during the war years. Since North Dakota Boys State was organized in 1938, Post 60 has sponsored delegates to all annual sessions.

The main revenue for post operations came from side-handled slot machines. When these machines were declared illegal by the attorney general in 194 7, they were removed from the club premises. Voiture 817 of the Forty and Eight was formed in 1925. Later, it was merged into Fargo’s Voiture 240 of the 40 et 8.

In the early 1930s, land was set aside at the Woodbine Cemetery, located on the west edge of the city, for the purpose of establishing a Veterans cemetery. This section of the cemetery has been maintained by the Legion’s Post 60 throughout the years. In the 1980s, Legionnaire Gene Henricks was instrumental in improving the maintenance as well as overseeing the construction of a Veterans Monument now in place in this cemetery.

Due to the manpower’ shortage brought on by World War II, many WW I Legionnaires went into the fields during the war years to help farmers harvest their crops.

The American Legion and its Auxiliary were active in assisting in high-water fights in our flood-prone city – furnishing food and dike patrols as needed. During the early stages of WW II, Valley City Legion members also served as guards along the strategic Hi-Line Bridge, over which the former Northern Pacific Railroad transported military equipment and personnel as well as food and materials crucial to the nation’s war effort.

Former Mayor Fred J. Frederickson, for the 1930-31 year, was the first of eight Valley City Legionnaires to serve as District 1 commander. The others were Neal Tracy, 1935-36; Thomas C. Brown, 1937-38; Amos Rood, 1939-40, Clarence V. Carlson, 1942-43, Harold Davidson, who died shortly after assuming the district commandership and Brown accepted the call to return and complete the unexpired 1946-47 term; Milton W. Kane, 1979-80, and Helmer Wenaas, 1982-83. Rev. Dewitt Myers, a Methodist minister who accepted a call at Valley City during the 1940-41 year, served as department chaplain for five years. He was initially elected to that office from Post 106 for the 1939-41 years while serving his ministry at Fairmount, and then reelected as state chaplain for the 1941-44 years from Post 60.

Dr. A. D. Ottinger, upon completion of his 1949-50 term as department vice-commander for the Eastern Region, ran unsuccessfully for department commander at the 1950 state convention at Grand Forks. Walter T. Stine in 1955-56, Milton W. Kane in 1980-81 and Helmer Wenaas in 1984-85 also served in that department vice-commander position.

Kane, who was Barnes County veterans service officer for over 13 years, ran and won the race for department commander at the 1982 state convention in Minot, then serving in that office during 1982-83. He followed with service as 1984-86 alternate national executive committeeman and 1986-88 department historian.

Appointed commissioner of veterans affairs for North Dakota July 1, 1985, Kane served over eight years in that position until he retired in early 1994. Wenaas, very active in the local Legion baseball program, has provided dedicated service on the department oratorical contest committee during the past decade.

Also very active in finance and Legion programs at Valley City was Ervin Nagle, who served loyally until his recent death.

In the late 1950s a past post commander suggested that Post 60 discontinue the American Legion baseball program. When this proposal was brought up on the floor at a post meeting and, after heated discussion, it was rejected and the idea was dropped. This challenge to the program pumped some adrenaline into this youth activity. The Post 60 Legion baseball program now enjoys an excellent playing field and has placed second and third in Class B tournaments. The facility was named Charlie Brown Field after a disabled young man who never missed a ball game and remembered: all the stats from prior years.

Post 60 hosted department conventions in 1925, 1931 and 1939. We also hosted the 1966 winter conference. Due to the loss of older hotels and lack of motel space, there were inadequate housing facilities to host these events here in later years. With the infusion of younger veterans returning home from military service, the Valley City American Legion’s Drum and Bugle Corps was reorganized after WW II by Adrian Pfusch. Ten years later, Pfusch retired and Lowell Peterson led the corps for two more years before it was disbanded.

During its active years, this musical organization, both the original WW I group and the post-WW II corps, provided many performances and entertained throngs along parade routes at national and state Legion conventions as well as at local and area community events. The unit reassembled once more, in 1983, to participate in the observance of Valley City’s centennial celebration.

Post 60 enjoyed many years of activity and remodeling under the direction of Club Manager Algeo Norberg and Assistant Managers Vernon Triebold and Melford Olson.

A great asset to Post 60 has been its active American Legion Auxiliary unit. Without these dedicated ladies, many of the Legion activities would not have been successful. Many thanks to this helping hand organization!

Post 60 Commanders

Post YearPost Commander
1919D.S. Ritchie
1919-20C.T. Hoverson
1920-21Neal Tracy
1921-22T.S. Henry
1922-23Jack McDonald (Part)
1922-23A.F. Greffenius (Part)
1923-24T.M. Condon
1924-25Fred J. Frederickson
1925-26G.J. Christianson
1926-27Dr. W.E. Turner
1927-28Glenn Leavitt
1928-29Charles F. Mudgett
1929-30Dr. C.E. Johnson
1930-31Clarence V. Carlson
1931-32J. W. Bliss
1932-33Fred Rau
1933-34L.D. Rhoades
1934-35A.H. Pfusch
1935-36Thomas C. Brown
1936-37Amos Rood
1937-38E. N. Johnson
1938-39John Koehn
1939-40L.T. Sproul
1940-41Dr. Max Moore
1941-42Dr. A. D. Ottinger
1942-43Paul Baarstad
1943-44A.R. Tate
1944-45Harold Davidson
1945-46Paul M. Barnes
1946-47C. Willard Carlson
1947-48George Fogarty
1948-49W.T. Stine
1949-50H.W. Brier
1950-51Orville Isensee
1951-52Lyle Myhre
1952-53Clarence Roughton
1953-54Bernard Lyons
1954-55Theodore Hedstrom
1955-56Dale Sorenson
1956-57James Spilman
1957-58Ty Peterson
1958-59Don Nasseth
1959-60A.W. Hill
1960-61R. Lester Duncan
1961-62Paul V. Reslock
1962-63Lowell H. Wright
1963-64Milton W. Kane
1964-65Erwin Nagle
1965-66Lee Holm
1966-68Gorman King
1968-69Harry Salisbury
1969-70Roy Gentry
1970-71Gale M. Anderson
1971-73Miles Holden
1973-74Don Trader
1974-75Al Gimbel
1975-76Algeo Norberg
1976-77Gust Dechant
1977-79Ken Ford
1979-80Donald Opdahl
1980-81Gene Henricks
1981-82Vernon Thilmony
1982-83Melford Olson
1983-84Roger Bischoff
1984-85Harry Pedersen
1985-86Franz Pedersen
1986-87Cal Olafson
1987-88William Hintz
1988-89James Fagerstrom
1989-92Helmer Wenaas
1992-94Norman Erber

Post 61 Brocket ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 61, Royal O. Gray Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Third District and located in Brocket, North Dakota.

Charter

The Royal O. Gray Post 61 received its national organizational charter on October 2, 1919.

Namesake

Royal O. Gray was born in Liverne, Iowa on November 25, 1895.  He was inducted in Cooperstown, North Dakota on February 16, 1918.  He served overseas in France from May 10, 1918 until he was killed in action on September 30, 1918.  He was initially buried in France.  His remains were returned to the United States on September 19, 1921 and he was then buried at Lakota, North Dakota.

Post 62 Walhalla ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 62, Bartlette-Resler Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, Second District and located in Walhalla, North Dakota.

Charter

Monday evening, Oct. 13, 1919, marked the organization of a post of The American Legion in Walhalla, ND. One preliminary meeting had been held but little had been done except to apply for a charter. Upon its arrival the next meeting was called to perfect the organization.

The name of the post was unanimously chosen to be “Bartlette-Resler Post” in honor of the first two from Walhalla to fall in action. They were: Patrick Bartlette and Nicholas Resler. The third young man, from Walhalla, to give his life was Albert Gariepy. However, the members attending the organizational meeting decided to use the names of the first two instead of all three or only the first one.

The membership in 1919 totaled 36. The lowest membership was 11 in 1933. The highest was 231 in 1981. This was the 22nd consecutive year of exceeding the membership of previous years. It was also the 11th consecutive year of setting an all-time high in membership. The membership has dwindled every year since, to 187 in 1993.

Only six female veterans have belonged to Post 62 … two from WW I and three from WW II, all deceased except one from the latter war, and one from the Vietnam War.

The last charter member of Post 62 passed away on May 31, 1991, in Oregon, where he had his membership for many years. Our last WW I member passed away Aug. 14, 1991.

Post 62 has been served by 54 different members as Post Commander. They include 20 WW I, 25 WW II, three Korean War and six Viet Nam veterans, one of whom also served in Desert Storm and is the first Persian Gulf War member to serve as Post 62 Commander. Two from WW I each served four terms. Some others served two and three terms.

Namesake

Patrick Barthlette was born September 26, 1888.  He enlisted in the North Dakota National Guard at Grafton, North Dakota and served with the 164th infantry.  He served overseas from July 15, 1917until he was killed in action on May 30, 1918.  His grave is unlocated.

Nicholas Resler was born in Leroy, North Dakota on August 8, 1895.  He was inducted at Cavalier, North Dakota on May 27, 918.  He served overseas in France from August 11, 1918 until he died of wounds received in combat on October 4, 1918.  He was initially buried in France.  His remains were returned to the United States on August 4, 1921 and he is buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

History

Post Home

Post 62 rented (or borrowed) the Woodsmen Lodge Hall in Walhalla for their meetings from 1919 to 1926 when the membership decided to build a post home. This building was 40′ x 80′ and was enclosed, but never completed on the inside. No foundation. It had a floor perfect for dances. Many dances for the public were sponsored by the post. The Walhalla School did not have an auditorium at the time, so the then annual Baccalaureate Service and Graduation exercises were held in The American Legion building, as well as school proms and dances. And many other local functions.

A local man held a mortgage on the Legion building, and because of mishandling of post funds by some members, he was forced to foreclose in 1936. He then sold the building to the Walhalla Lutheran Congregation to be used as its church.

During WW II the post membership bought a school house (no longer in use in the country) and moved it to Walhalla. This proved too small so the post sold it and bought two other old adjacent buildings. Of course, this created another mortgage. While a new building was being built to house the U.S. Post Office, the Postal Department rented one of the Legion buildings. At the same time the School District was reorganized and did not have the extra rooms needed so, while more rooms were built, the School District rented the other building. That piece of business paid off the mortgage.

The members of Post 62 started to dream about a new hall for The American Legion to replace these two old buildings. In the spring of 1965, the two old buildings were sold and moved to the country. A new 40′ x70′ insulated cement block building was built on that same site. This building included a 40’x40′ auditorium, a complete kitchen, ladies rest room and cloak room, the same for the men, furnace and store room and a complete bar room. No basement. This building was dedicated on Nov. 11, 1965.

Due to so much interest and generous financial support from everyone in the community, this building was paid for in a short time and the note (not a mortgage) was burned during the celebration of The American Legion national birthday on the second Sunday of March 1967. In just a few years, the 40’x40′ room proved too small, so the end of the building was extended 20′ making that room 40’x60′ and was paid in full in two years.

Many local organizations use The American Legion facilities for a suggested donation. The Knights of Columbus sponsors a public dance on a Saturday near Valentine’s Day. The Volunteer Fire Department sponsors an Oyster Stew with a ham supper on the second Wednesday in March. The Country (Golf) Club has its annual meeting, supper and dance on the first Saturday in April. The High School Junior and Senior Class banquet in early May. The Cub Scouts Blue and Gold banquet in mid-May. The Scouts (Boys and Girls) are the only groups to meet without a donation. The Farmers Elevator Co. and the Cooperative Oil Co. have their annual meeting and dinner for their customers during the summer. Three Townships surrounding Walhalla hold the Primary and General Elections in the Legion building.

Blood Donor Clinics are conducted annually with the help of Auxiliary Unit 62. Pembina County farm meetings are held during the year. The Roughrider Saddle Club has an annual meeting and sponsors a public dance in the fall. The Masonic Lodge sponsors a fish feed for the public on the first Thursday in December.

Teenage dances chaperoned by parents are held a few times a year. Many weddings have been celebrated in the Legion, too. Auxiliary unit and post members have hosted many wedding receptions and dances at the Legion, also numerous family reunions and parties. Some funerals have been conducted there, and a church group (that does not believe in having a church building) has met there at different times and now meets in private homes.

During the 1940’s and ’50s, the Walhalla Lutheran Congregation put its building (the former Legion hall) on a foundation and completed a full basement. But above the foundation, now completed, it was an old building. So in 1974 the Lutherans sold their building to the Walhalla SonShine Baptist Congregation and then started a new building for the Lutherans. During this construction the Lutherans used the Legion Hall for Sunday School and Worship Services every Sunday for 16 months, rent free, except for a donation for fuel…no set amount, whatever the Lutherans wished to make.

All organizations mentioned make generous donations to sponsoring students to Girls State, Boys State and International Music Camp. So with the many functions for The American Legion and The American Legion Auxiliary, the building is used a lot.

Post 63 Westhope ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 63, Westhope Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Sixth District and located in Westhope, North Dakota.

Charter

The Westhope Post 63 received its initial national organizational charter on October 8, 1919. The Post received its permanent national organizational charter on June 30, 1924. The Post disbanded and its charter was cancelled on September 29, 1946. The Post reorganized on July 20, 1946. Is subsequently disbanded and its charter cancelled on October 8, 1950.

Namesake

Named after the town of Westhope

History

Post Officers/Membership

Post YearCommanderAdjutantMembership
1919-20A. J. DrakeE. E. Green 
1920-21W. A. HalseyH. J. Patterson 
1921-22Inactive  
1922-23Inactive  
1923-24Inactive  
1924-25Albert MytromO. B. Benson15
1925-26Leo J. WeberHenry Swenson16
1926-27Inactive  
1927-28Inactive  
1928-29Inactive  
1929-30Leo WeberArthur E. Olson17
1930-31Oliver DakkenS. H. Miller 
1931-32Disbanded  
1932-33   
1933-34   
1934-35   
1935-36   
1936-37   
1937-38   
1938-39   
1939-40   
1940-41   
1941-42   
1942-43   
1943-44   
1944-45   
1946  21
1946-47J. H. MunnStanley Feland 
1947-48Not RecordedD. C. Benson 
1948-49Disbanded  

Post 64 Kenmare ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 64, Heidenberg-Peterson Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Sixth District and located in Kenmare, North Dakota.

Charter

The Heidenberg-Peterson Post 64 received its national organizational charter on October 8, 1919.

The organization of Heidenberg-Peterson Post 64 was perfected October 8, 1919, with 16 charter members. The post adopted the name of Heidenberg-Peterson in tribute to Lars Paul Peterson and Arvid Heidenberg, the first young men killed in World War I.

Namesake

Peterson was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Christ Peterson and Heidenberg, the son of Rev. and Mrs. C.C. Heidenberg.

Peterson was born December 3, 1898, at Mayville, ND. At the age of 19, he enlisted July 15, 1917, in Company C, 2nd Infantry North Dakota National Guard. He was killed in action July 19, 1918, in France. His body was buried in France and, later, returned here and laid to rest in Lakeview Cemetery. Heidenberg was born April 11, 1896, and enlisted in the same company as Peterson. He too was killed in France, the day before Peterson and was buried in Arsne, France.

History

Charter Members and Officers

On November 27, 1919, the first meeting was called and the following officers elected: Fred Ewing, commander, Paul J. Tehelka, vice-commander; Walter Enochson, adjutant; Paul Bertelson, historian, and Robert A. Lowe, treasurer. These officers were to hold office for six months. The first meeting place was the Lyceum Theatre, located on the west side of the city square. Dues were set at $2 per member.

A great deal of interest was shown in the soldiers’ bonus, and there was a considerable amount of correspondence between the various posts and the state organization on this subject. This post went on record as not compromising in the matter of the treatment of the slacker, the draft evader, and the “conscientious objector.” Some of them, who are now holding the “pussy-footed” soft jobs, will be first to feel the blow.

The Legion went on record demanding that the honorable discharges granted these slackers be rescinded. The Legion will also make a demand for cooperation with the public health service, endeavoring to establish a bureau to aid servicemen in obtaining employment upon returning home from military duty.

There were other constructive objectives, but the most important feature of the meeting was the fact that the returned service men had banded themselves together “for God, Country and Humanity.” In this connection, one of the objectives of the post will be to have entertainment, social gatherings and other activities. In the following months, many dances, picnics and card parties were held; various talent groups presented their plays, and outside groups were brought into town to provide entertainment for the public.

Charter members were: Paul Tehelka, Martin Bush, Fred Ewing, John Finn, Herman Meyer, Robert Lowe, George Kaltsukis, Holger Peterson, Arthur Orcutt, Daniel Fisk, Nels U. Nelson, C.A. Hagberg, Chris Jensen, Niels Peter Jorgensen, and Peter Tompers.

It was in December 1921 that a committee was appointed to secure the necessary signatures to obtain an American Legion Auxiliary unit charter. A motion also was approved for Post 64 to spearhead the effort to obtain a Forty et Eight charter, based at Kenmare. In 1922, the 40 and 8 was organized. Kenmare was granted the second charter in the state, making it the only 40 et 8 voiture operating in Ward County and western North Dakota. There were 17 charter members.

In February of 1926, the executive committee made up of A.L. Christianson, C.A. Thompson, T.O Odland, F.E. Schultz, and R. Kinkade met to talk over buying lots in the eastern part of town for a Memorial Park. This is now our baseball field. On December 15, 1926, a motion was made and carried to deed the Park to the City of Kenmare.

In May 1927, on Memorial Day, The American Legion Park was dedicated. It was the first American Legion Memorial Park to be dedicated in this area. Reverend Victor Phillips delivered the dedicatory address. The grandstand was the real feature, capable of seating 600 people. The baseball diamond was one of the finest in the state.

At the March 1929 meeting, it was decided to organize a drum and bugle corps, with uniforms and other necessary equipment to be ordered at once. Much time and effort were given in trying to secure the erecting of the Ward County War Memorial Building at Kenmare. At the April meeting, it was decided the Legion should sponsor a baseball team for Kenmare boys 15 and under.

In 1930, plans were made to erect a $40,000 Ward County War Memorial Building, the rooms upstairs to be used by the Legion and Auxiliary. In February 1930, the meeting brought forth a preliminary budget proposal to furnish the memorial rooms, the ex-servicemen’s room and the kitchen.

During the winter of 1930, local and nearby Legion posts sponsored a series of dog sled races on the lake. This provided competition between the mushers in and around Kenmare and neighboring towns.

The Memorial Day services in 1930 were incorporated into the laying of the cornerstone of the new Ward County World War Memorial Building. State Legion officers visited the local post and conducted a Legion meeting at the Irvin Hotel.

On October 16, 1930, the new Kenmare World War Memorial Building was dedicated. Governor George F. Shafer gave the address. Acceptance of the Memorial Building on behalf of area ex-servicemen was made by Legion Commander James H. Sinclair, Jr., of Kenmare Post 64.

A statewide Legion and Auxiliary officers conference was held in Kenmare March 23-24, 1931, with 350 present and leaders said it was the best ever held in the state.

A membership report in April 1931 showed the local post had 107 members, placing this post among the top chapters in the state.

In January 1933, T.J. Vaaler was elected commander. Rabbit hunts were organized that winter. Money derived from the sale of rabbits would go to the post fund.

In 1933, Post 64 cooperated with the Legion’s club in organizing an athletic club and also coordinating planning with the Kenmare Association of Commerce in celebrating the opening of the new picnic grounds at Tasker’s Coulee.

The 1938-39 commander was Charles Lovejoy and the vice-commander was A. O. Peterson. In 1944, a card of sympathy was sent to Carl Heglund and family on the death of their son, Blaine, who was killed in action in Germany. In June, a memorial service was held for Roy Torkelson, who was killed in action in England.

In 1945, the Legion “Bonds for Bombs” drive was a success. The proceeds amounted to $30,000, exceeding its quota of $24,000. Also in March that year, a memorial service was held in the auditorium for Twan D. Wade, killed in action. In April, a memorial service was held for President Franklin D. Roosevelt in the auditorium.

Also this was the first year that an Outstanding Student School Award was given to a graduating senior. The recipient was Rodney Caufield.

In 1947 the Kenmare Volunteer Ambulance Service was started and was supported by our American Legion post.

In 1949, Byron Krantz, Sr., presented Dr. D. J. Halliday with a check for $1,585 to be used to buy a new operating table at the hospital and, in October, a benefit dance was held to raise money to purchase an oxygen tent for the hospital.

At the December meeting, the Legion collected about 300 pounds of toys for shipment to children in Europe. The program was known as T.O.T., toys for tots.

In 1950, a new ambulance was purchased through the efforts of the Legion and the VFW. Residents were reminded that ambulance service was available on a 24-hour basis. The sum of $5,000 had been raised to buy the ambulance.

In 1951, Clayton Sand suggested that a “mock cemetery” be set up in the Square on Memorial Day to eliminate the necessity of marching to both cemeteries. This tradition is still being used today. Our post achieved its all-time enrollment of 151 members in 1953.

In 1956, the Legion sponsored an air show on July 1st attracting an estimated 2,500 spectators, including several hundred from Canada. Billed as “Dakota State Air Days,” it was the largest air show ever held in this portion of the state. It was staged at the Municipal Airport, featuring many spectacular aerial demonstrations to thrill the crowd.

Kenmare’s Memorial Grade School, which now houses classes for the first four elementary grades, was dedicated September 23, 1956. During the dedication, recognition was paid to the veterans of World War II who channeled a share of memorial money to the new school. In 1957, the Legion sponsored a benefit road show called the National Spotlight Revue, with proceeds to help purchase playground equipment for the school.

At the October meeting in 1958, two films were shown, entitled “Post Public Relations Thinking for The American Legion” and “Back to God,” the later film being a story of the four chaplains who died on the troop ship U.S.S. Dorchester.

In 1967, in recognition: of the Legion’s new Law and Order program, the local police and patrol force were honored.

Certificates of achievement were presented by past Department Commander Ed Milligan of Bottineau to Police Chief Reuben Jessen for 21 years of service, to Delmer Mickelson for 12 years, to Pete Wulfekuhl and Edward Johnson, each for 4 years, and to Highway Patrolman Walter Thompson for 26 years.

In 1968, the post began organizing the Boy Scouts and Cub Scouting programs in Kenmare, with Ed Johnson as Legion representative.

The Legion’s 50th birthday was to be celebrated for 15 months beginning in September 1968 and ending Veteran’s Day in 1969. Post Adjutant Oscar Kostad gave a brief history of the post. Continuous membership awards were presented to Oscar Kostad for 20 years, Walter Thompson, 25 years, Lewis Mickelson, 35 years, and Nick Schammel, 40 years. Robert Gehring and Ted Vaaler received honors for having 50 years of continuous membership and were presented 50th anniversary plaques and 50 year pins.

Presented with a 50th anniversary tie bar were all the other World War I veterans of the post. They were: Lawrence Bird, Mike Frank, Alvin Granlund, Victor Hanson, Jans Helmers, Laurits Jorgenson, William C. Johnson, Adolph Johnson, Nels U. Nelson, Nels Jorgensen, Alfred Jorgenson, Howard Johnson, Lewis Mickelson, Isadore Mogren, Holger Peterson, Johannes Nielsen, Goodman Norwick, Joseph Rodin, Nick Schammel, Ben Townsend and Louis Anderson.

Heidenberg-Peterson Post 64 celebrated the Legion’s 50th anniversary with a banquet March 27, 1969. Past National Commander of The American Legion John E. Davis of Bismarck gave the evening address. A 50-year continuous membership plaque was presented to Ben Townsend.

In 1970, a new ambulance was purchased from Peterson Chevrolet for $8,786, which was delivered in April. The new ambulance was placed in service in May. The 1970 Suburban with raised roof featured room for 4 stretchers. Mayor Lester Hansen presented the keys to Oscar Kostad, who received it on behalf of the two veterans’ organizations.

On September 5, 1970, our post assisted with military rites for Specialist Fifth Class Larry Jacobson of Norma. Larry was killed in Vietnam August 26, 1970. Members of the honor guard and color guard were at Minot’s airport to receive the body when it arrived. Larry’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Art Jacobson of Norma, presented a picture of Larry to the post to be hung in a place of honor in the Veterans rooms of the Memorial Hall.

Oscar Kostad was featured in the Northwestern Bell News and The Kenmare News in 1977 for placing flags around the square in Kenmare on national holidays. This program started in 1960 and was continued for 11 years.

On April 7th, 1972, the 6th District spring meeting was held in Kenmare. This was the first district meeting to be held here in many years. District Commander Oscar Kostad and Post Commander Deral Ramsdell presided over the meeting.

In 1972, Kenmare’s American Legion post assisted in carryinig the colors to lead the parade in celebrating Kenmare’s Diamond Jubilee. The post also hosted a public old time dance in the Memorial Hall.

In 1973, the post hosted the Western North Dakota District Legion bowling tournament on four weekends. The post has also been active in sponsoring scholarships to International Music Camp and supporting the Bell Tower fund at the Peace Garden.

On July 1, 1978, the Legion post and the VFW entered into an agreement to jointly lease the Midget Bar on the north edge of the city, to be operated as a Veterans Club. The club leased the bar for one year with the option to buy. All moneys spent on the lease, was applied to the purchase price of $175,000.

In January 1979, Charles Leet and Allen Helmers presented a check for $100,000 to the Kenmare Swimming Pool fund for construction of a new pool. The Veterans Club had donated $2,500 to the school to purchase new scoreboards.

The 60th anniversary of The American Legion was celebrated March 10, 1979, at the Veterans Club.

On Jan. 9, 1980, the Kenmare World War II Last Man’s Club was organized. Membership was open to any veteran who served during WW II. A membership drive ended on November 1st for all time. A total of 90 veterans had joined the club. The first annual party was held November 14th for members and spouses.

In a spectacular early morning fire on February 4th, 1980, the Veterans Club was destroyed. The fire was first noticed about 5 a.m. and was too far advanced to control. Everything was lost in the fire. In May, the veterans’ organizations held a joint meeting to discuss plans to rebuild a new Veterans Club and the decision was made to erect a new building. In 1981, local contractors were hired to construct the building and, by December, everything was completed. The new club opened for business on January 23, 1981. A grand opening was held the week of March 30 – April 4.

In 1988, Robert C. Gehring was honored at the April meeting for having 69 years of continuous membership in the Legion. A veteran of WW I, he had been a member since 1921 and was one of the oldest active and continuous members in the state. Gehring passed away September 20, 1988, at the age of 95. Before he died he had already paid his 1989 dues, so he was credited with having 70 years of Legion membership … a record for this post.

In 1989, the Legion and VFW posts lost their bid to retain ownership of the Veterans Club. Due to financial conditions of the club, a foreclosure was made by the State Bank, which held the lease.

Lakeview Corp., a 1ocally owned corporation, sold shares of stock to raise funds and, in October, had purchased the assets of the club and reopened it under the name of 52-North.

Upwards of 500 people attended the community support, victory and welcome home rally held in the high school gymnasium April 4, 1991, for the purpose of honoring area service men and women serving in branches of the military during the Middle East conflict. The color guards of the Legion posts at Tolley, Donnybrook and Kenmare presented the colors.

On January 25, 1993 WW I veteran Goodman Norwick celebrated 101 years of age. Goodman had 38 continuous years with the Legion. He entered the Army in November of 1917 and trained between Paris, France, and the front lines. He returned to the U.S. in August 1919. Officers elected for 1993-94 were Post Commander, Stan Freeman; Vice-Commander, Fredrick Cart; Adjutant, James Strandberg; Finance Officer, Otis Schwartz; Service Officer, Don Thompson; Historian, Albert Schmitz; Chaplain, Marvin Ness, and Sergeant-at-Arms, Ray Smith.

Post 64 Commanders

Post YearPost Commander
1919Fred Ewing
1920John (Jack) Finn (Part)
1920-21A.H. Orcutt (Part)
1921E.R. Johnson (Part)
1921-22Walter Enockson (Part)
1922L.B. Miller (Part)
1922-23P.J. McLaughlin (Part)
1922-23Al Ness (Part)
1923-25Bryon A. Krantz
1925-26E.R. Johnson
1926-27A.L. Christensen
1927-28Otto Engel
1928-29A.F. McKenzie
1929-30A.J. Pass
1930-31James H. Sinclair, Jr.
1931-32G.G. Geiger
1932-33Theodore J. Vaaler
1933-34C.E. Balcom
1934-35Romayne Taylor
1935-36David J. Halliday
1936-37Harry E. Preston
1937-38Nels U. Nelson
1938-39Charles Lovejoy
1939-40A.O. Peterson
1940-41Romayne Taylor
1941-42F.E. Boghton
1942-43Otto Engel
1943-44Byron A. Krantz
1944-45Lewis Mickelson
1945-46Lalon C. Leet
1946-47Robert J. Gehring
1947-48LaVerne F. Bass
1948-49Walter J. Thompson
1949-50Arthur J. Hansen
1950-5lJohn D. Odland
1951-52Arthur C. Carstens
1952-53Virgil E. Karmgard
1953-54Harold E. Carlson
1954-55Howard S. Huenecke
1955-56Clayton Sand
1956-57Otis Schwartz
1957-58Don Gast
1958-59Don O’Fallon
1959-60Donald Mortenson
1960-61Oscar Kostad
1961-62Kenneth McKeague
1962-63Marvin Lindquist
1963-64Byron A. Krantz
1964-65Raymond J. Smith
1965-66Arnold E. Mickelson
1966-67Edward J. Johnson
1967-70Allen Helmers
1970-71Donald E, Lindberg
1971-73Derat Ramsdell
1973-74Otis Schwartz
1974-76Kenneth Chapman
1976-77Ralph Modin, Jr.
1977-78Dave Geyer
1978-79Martin Mahlum
1979-81Steve Brekhus
1981-82Dale Nordstrom
1982-83Otis Schwartz
1983-84Deral Ramsdell
1984-86Bruce Ankenbauer
1986-87Kenneth Chapman
1987-88David Geyer
1988-90Steve Brekhus
1990-92Oscar Kostad
1992-94Stanley Freeman

Post 65 Wing ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 65, Francis J. Harty Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Fifth District and located in Wing, North Dakota.

Charter

The Francis J. Harty Post 65, initially the Ernest Julius Erickson Post 65 in Regan, North Dakota, received its national organizational charter on October 8, 1919. The Post disbanded and its charter was cancelled on December 15, 1945. The Post reorganized as the Quentin C. Roosevelt Post 65 in Wing-Regan and received their second national organizational charter on December 26, 1945. On August 22, 1956 the Post changed its name to the Francis J. Harty Post 65 designation.

Namesake

Francis J. Harty was born in Wing, North Dakota on July 12, 1921.  He entered the United States Marine Corps in Minneapolis, Minnesota May 21, 1942.  He served in the Asiatic-Pacific theatre.  He was killed in action at Saipan on June 6, 1944.  He is buried at the Ft. Snelling National Cemetery, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

History

The Quentin C. Roosevelt Post 65, initially the Ernest Julius Erickson Post, was chartered October 8, 1919, in Regan, ND. Walter L. Peterson was chosen the first post commander and Fred E. Wollitz was the first post adjutant. In addition to Peterson and Wollitz, other charter members were David E. Mattis, Howard L. Gramlin , Jake A. Fischer, Henry Danielson, Albert E. Knudson, Joseph W. Keifer, Ansell J. McCall, Otto C. Uhde, Vernon G. Hallum, Wilbur H. Van Orman, Oliver P. Void, C.M. Baker and Beecher K. Malone.

The post folded after two years and then reorganized in 1925 and operated until 1935 when it again disbanded. Then in late 1945 it reorganized as Quentin C. Roosevelt Post 65, Wing-Regan, with Albert Gray as commander, Francis Dalbec as adjutant and Clarence Kittleson as finance officer.

This post continued until 1949, when Regan chartered its own Legion post and Wing continued as Quentin C. Roosevelt Post 65. Then in 1956 we changed our name to Francis J. Harty Post 65 in memory of Harty who was killed in action on Saipan during World War II as a member of the U.S. Marine Corps. Harty is the only Wing area veteran killed in action as of the writing of this history.

69 Charter Members Reorganized Post 65 in 1945

Alm, Willis

Amundson, Leo

Anderson, Bernard

Anderson, Levi

Aune, Ole

Backman, Willard

Bailey, Raymond

Bosch, Anton

Broehl, Marvin

Broehl, Raymond

Broehl, Vernon

Cleveland, Ed

Clooten, Francis

Coleman, Melvin

Dalbec, Francis

Eckholm, Henry

Edgerton, Clyde

Foell, George

Fritz, Frank

Ghylin, Alvin

Ghylin, Gerald

Glanville, Harold

Glanville, Irvin

Graf, Jake

Graf, William

Gray, Albert

Gray, Clarence

Gray, James

Harju, Hubert

Hill, Norval

Hogue, Emil

Holgerson, Harold

Holgerson, Marion

Johnson, Vernon

Josephson, Arnold

Ketchum, Frank

Kettleson, Clarence

Kettleson, William

Kindred, Charles

Lein, Ray

Little, Virgil

Liuska, Eddie

Liuska, Edwin

Liuska, Eli

McFadden, Darrel

Morris, Ray

Nieters, Albert

Neiters, Herman

Norbeqk, John

Novy, Paul

Olson, Bert

Olson, Clarence

Ouren, H.E.

Perkins, Harold E.

Rise, Arthur

Rise, Everett

Rise, Joseph

Ruhman, Melvin

Sedivec, George

Seilinger, Earl

Strand, John

Strob, Paul

Uhde, Otto (Dick)

Wainio, Henry

Watkins, John

Wayrymen, Riend W.

Weber, Ben

Wold, Olaf

Zelmer, Emil

Post Home

The Wing Legion Hall was built in 1950. With the debt retired, a mortgage burning ceremony was conducted in February 1956. Our post is greatly indebted to Francis and Irene Dalbec for their donation of an old house in 1969, which was added on to the hall for bathrooms and a kitchen. In 1971, they donated the Wing Theatre to the post which we operated until 1979, when the Wing Booster Club took over operations and have since moved the theatre into the Wing Town Hall. The Booster Club still continues to run movies from April to December. Theatre Manager and Booster Club secretary-treasurer is David A. Liuska.

Programs

The post has provided many services to the Wing community and surrounding area. They include:

  • Sponsoring a Veterans Farm Training program in the 1950s
  • Permitted the school system to use our building for a classroom in 1961-62 during construction of the new school
  • Purchased a wheel chair to be used by anyone who needs it in the community and have added other supplies as well
  • Sponsored American Legion baseball. The Wing-Tuttle-Robinson team advanced to state tournament competition in 1963, 1977, and 1978.
  • Purchased the first oxygen unit and stretcher for emergency use, which has been taken over by the Wing Ambulance
  • Sponsored boys to Boys State for 47 years

The post continues to be proud of its color guard and firing squad. In 1992, we combined with the Tuttle VFW and purchased 18 new sets of uniforms. The new color guard continues to lead the Tuttle Dairy Day parade in June, the Driscoll 4th of July parade and the Wing Community Day parade, also in July. On Memorial Day, the full squad attends grave site services at these cemeteries: Unioni Ahola, Lein Langedahl, Robinson, Catholic Cemetery, Tuttle, Arena and Wing. In Wing, we have a good program and potluck dinner to end our services. These units perform military rites at funerals when requested.

The Legion Hall was used for many meetings and especially the Wing Senior Citizens Club, who took over the building in 1981, did some extensive remodeling and still operates it today. The post retained meeting privileges and other functions as needed.

The post was instrumental in supporting a successful four-mill memorial levy in Burleigh County in 1955. The levy resuited in the Wing Memorial Auditorium with the help of Linden School District 28.

In 1985, the post built a monument in the Wing Cemetery that honors all deceased veterans in the community. The monument is the site of graveside services on Memorial Day.

The post conducts a flagpole project, in which the deceased veteran’s flag is donated to the post. We then fly the flags on Memorial Day, 4th of July, Wing Community Day and Veterans Day if the weather permits.

Our post had 68 members when it observed The American Legion’s 75th anniversary during 1993-94. Members then with 45 or more years of continuous membership were Lindy Lein and Raymond Hokana. Post 65 officers that year were Marvin Hochhalter, commander; Andrew Eckholm, vice-commander and service officer; Gary Simmons, finance officer and historian; David Liuska, adjutant, the position he has held for the past 20 years, and Douglas Hausauer, chaplain.

Serving as 5th District commander were Ray Lein, 1955-56, and David A. Liuska, 1982-83. Liuska chaired the department children and youth committee during 1985-87, was 1987-88 department vice-commander for the Central Region and, since 1989-90, has been a five-year member of the department Boys State committee.

Auxiliary Unit Active in Wing Community

The Auxiliary of Francis J. Harty Post 65 organized September 23, 1948. At that time it was the Auxiliary of Quentin C. Roosevelt Post 65. The first meeting was held at the John Harty home. Elected President was Mrs. John Harty; Vice-President – Mrs. Clarence Knudson; Secretary-Treasurer Mrs. Charles Kindred; Chaplain – Mrs. Albert Gray, and Sergeant at Arms – Mrs. Bert Olson.

Other charter members were the wives of Noah Collins, Harris Crimmins, Francis Dalbec, George Foell, Irvin Glanville, George Harmon, Bennie Hein, Lawrence Hopkins, Clarence Kettleson, Lindy Lein, Ray Lein, Raymond Morris, Emil Moses, Alex Neff, Ole Olson, George Sedivec, James Sedivec and Felix Siirtola.

The Auxiliary has assisted the post in celebrating and observing Memorial Day, Veterans Day and The American Legion’s birthday in March.

The unit has presented flags to the classrooms at school, remembered veterans with gifts and cards, donated money to various causes, sold poppies each year, held a poppy poster contest and had a patriotic float for the parade. Girls State has been a big project, sending delegates for 47 years.

Mrs. John Harty and Mrs. Emil Moses were recognized as Gold Star Mothers, having sons die on active duty during World War II.

Current officers are Linda Simmons, president; Rosemary Moses, vice-president; Paulette Rasmussen, treasurer, and Diane Liuska, secretary. A past fifth district president, Liuska is pursuing service as chair of various department committees and in state offices with the goal of becoming the Auxiliary’s turn-of-the-century department president.

Post 65 Commanders

Post YearPost Commander
1919-20Otto C. Uhde
1921-24Post was inactive
1924-25Otto C. Uhde
1925-28Fred A. Urbach
1928-29A.H. Helgeson
1929-31Otto C. Uhde
1931-32Martin Nelson
1932-33Fred A. Urbach
1933-35John Carlson
1935-45Post was disbanded
1945-46J.A. Gray
1946-48Bertrum Olson
1948-51George W. Harmon
1951-52David Loup
1952-53Ray Lein
1953-54Gerald Ghylin, resigned
1953-54Marion Holgerson
1954-55Lindy L. Lein
1955-56Harold Glanville
1956-57Ray Seibel
1957-58Harris Crimmins
1958-59Marvin Hochhalter
1959-60Reinhold Hertz
1960-61Lynn Trusty
1961-62Alnor Schauer
1962-63Dean Glanville
1963-64Calvin Wagner
1964-65Walter Eckholm
1965-66Ray Lein
1966-67George Jackson, Jr.
1967-68Harold Glanville
1968-69Clifford Engel
1969-70Lloyd Stroh
1970-71Leo Dockter
1971-72Burnell Paul
1972-73David Liuska
1973-74John Folmer
1974-75Lindy L. Lein
1975-76Wilbur Ochsner
1976-77Douglas Hertz
1977-78Gary Simmons
1978-79Stanley Thompson
1979-80Roger Thompson
1980-82Albert Mettler
1982-83Andrew Eckholm
1983-84Reiny Hertz
1984-85Gerald Ghylin
1985-86Marvin Hochhalter
1986-87Marlow Moses
1987-88Albert Mettler
1988-89Douglas Hausauer
1989-90Lloyd Stroh
1990-91John Folmer
1991-92Gerald Ghylin
1992-93Leo Dockter
1993-94Marvin Hochhalter

Post 66 New England ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 1, Anton Ulijohn Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Eighth District and located in New England, North Dakota.

Charter

The Anton Ulijohn Post 66 received its national organizational charter on October 9, 1919.

Namesake

The post was named in honor of Anton Ulijohn, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Anton Ulijohn of New England. Entering the Army June 13, 1917, he arrived in France Dec. 15, 1917. Two Silver Stars were awarded to him. He died September 17, 1918 from of wounds received in action near St. Mihiel, France. He was buried at Vertrezay, France; however, his remains were returned to the United States for reburial June 27, 1921, at New England, ND.

Ulijohn was cited in General Orders 69, Headquarters 1st Division, AEF, France, Oct. 17, 1918 for distinguished conduct during the operations against the enemy on the St. Mihiel salient Sept. 12-13, 1918, near Richecourt, France. He displayed unusual coolness and courage under heavy shell fire by appointing a leader for his squad and ordering it forward in an orderly manner after he and his second in command had been wounded. In Citation Orders 6, General Headquarters, AEF, France, dated June 3, 1919, he was cited for gallantry in action and for leadership of his squad.

History

Anton Ulijohn Post 66 of The American Legion was organized October 3, 1919, at New England and the national charter was promptly granted October 9th. The 15 charter members were Willard A. Hjort, Peter F. Gores, James L. Boucher, Ernest Jessen, Leo C. Riffle, Harry F. Gardner, Albert R. Spratt, Palmer O. Lokke, John J. Gehr, Peter M. Hagen, Thorlief L. Stangebye, Charles O. Bradley, George A. Sarchet, H.W. Helmer, and Charles H. McVey. After demonstrating satisfactory progress in its operations, the post was issued a permanent charter September 22, 1920  by the national organization.

Membership

In August 1920, 38 veterans of World War I held membership in Post 66. Following World War II, the post reached its all-time high enrollment of 252 members in 1946, before the new post at nearby Regent was organized. Our membership in 1994 was 163.

Programs

The post displays the flag of the United States on all major holidays at Railroad Park on Main Street, and flags are placed on all veterans’ graves at the Amidon, New England, Rainy Butte and Engraf (Our Redeemer) cemeteries on Memorial Day. The post and its Auxiliary jointly participate  in Memorial Day ceremonies to honor those who gave their lives in service and to remember those veterans who have passed away.

Those who died in service include Ulijohn, Harley Berton Gallup, Adam Boehm, Florian Sticka, Edward F. Buzalsky, Henry Franklin Brown, Aubrey J. Freeman, Herbert I. Gentz, Russell Howard, Willie Moe, Henry Dorner, Leander W. Ege, Willis E. Gentz, Ernest M. Holzemer, Tom Narum, John W. Brinkmeyer and Peter Binstock, Jr.

The post provides a firing squad and honor guard at the funerals of those who served their country. Post 66 has sponsored Legion Baseball for many years. One of the most notable teams to play in New England was the Fargo Legion team around 1950 when Roger Maris was one of the players.

Many New England Legionnaires have served as district, regional and department officers, as well as serving on many district and department committees. The post sends representatives to district meetings and to department conventions and conferences.

Post 66 Commanders

Post YearPost Commander
1919-20George A. Sarchet
1920-21Willard Hjort
1921-22J.L. Boucher
1922-23Jack Hansel
1923-25Frank Kenny
1925-26Dr. T.L. Stangebye
1926-27Al Hammes
1927-28John Gehr
1928-29Hugh Leacock
1929-30Thomas Gallup
1930-31Jacob W. Grasl
1931-32J.J. Zimmerman
1932-33Jacob W. Grasl
1933-35Hans Johnson
1935-36Sig Homelvig
1936-37E.T. Malzahn
1937-38John A. Strehlow
1938-39Thomas Gallup
1939-40J.J. Zimmerman
1940-42Henry Ness
1942-43Otho Harding
1943-44Frank Kenny
1944-45E.A. Child
1945-47Anton Holzemer
1947-48Joe Johnson
1948-49Ralph Paulsrud
1949-50E. A. Child
1950-51Norman Cross
1951-52Henry Zahn, Jr.
1952-53Chris Tarpo, Jr.
1953-54Earl C. Rundle
1954-55Ralph V. Brovold
1955-56Ted Strom
1956-57Leo W. Seren
1957-58Archie C. Bach
1958-59Robert A. Waller
1959-60Earl Homelvig
1960-61Michael A. Jung
1961-62Harold Oberlander
1962-63Richard O. Bock
1963-64Alvin B. Rotering
1964-65Ronald N. Bender
1965-66Kasper N. Krebs
1966-67Herbert J. Bohlman
1967-68Gilbert Buzalsky
1968-69William G. Hanson, Jr.
1969-70Harold Narum
1970-71Jack Kathrien
1971-72Elmer Riedlinger
1972-74Robert A. Waller
1974-75Warren E. Bock
1975-76Dennis P. Lutz
1976-77Richard Lutz
1977-78Dennis Rustan
1978-79Durand Lutz
1979-80Kenneth Kadrmas
1980-81Benedict Benz
1981-82Derald Schmitt
1982-83Daryle Dennis
1983-84Rick Maixner
1984-85Leroy Clendenen
1985-86Walter P. Jacobs
1986-87Robert Bauman
1987-88Louis J. Wanner
1988-89Raymond Schmitt
1989-90Gilbert Buzalsky
1990-91Herbert J. Bohlman
1991-92Robert A. Waller
1992-93Derald Schmitt
1993-94Jack Kathrein

Post 67 Max ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 67, John Herdt Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Sixth District and located in Max, North Dakota.

Charter

The John Herdt Post 67 received its initial national organizational charter on October 9, 1919. The Post disbanded and its charter was cancelled on May 17, 1928.  The Post reorganized in May 1, 1929 and became North Dakota Post 241.

Namesake

John Herdt was born in Russia on September 28, 1893.  He was inducted at Washburn, North Dakota on September 4, 1918.  He died on October 7, 1918 at Augusta, Georgia while assigned to the 53rd Depot Brigade.  He is buried in Max, North Dakota.

Post 68 Robinson ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 68, Rueben and Leon Ochsner Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Fifth District and located in Robinson, North Dakota.

Charter

The Rueben and Leon Oschner Post was initially the Louis Instad Post 68 in Tuttle, North Dakota. The Post received its national organizational charter on October 17, 1919. The Post disbanded and its charter was cancelled in June 15, 1925. Subsequently the area veterans sought to retain the Post 68 designation in Robinson, North Dakota as the Rueben and Leon Ochsner Post. The Post received its second national organizational charter on January 23, 1946. This Post disbanded and its charter was cancelled on October 8, 1953.

Namesake

Post 68 in Robinson, North Dakota appears to have been initially named after Louis Instead not Louis Instad.  Louis Instead was born in Bergen, Norway in January 888.  He was inducted at Steele, North Dakota on March 28, 1918.  He served overseas in France from May 27, 1918 until he was killed in action on September 26, 1918.  He is buried in the American Cemetery at Meuse-Argonne France. The Post was renamed the Rueben and Leon Ochsner Post.  Leon Ochsner was born at Arena, North Dakota on December 22, 1919.  He entered the U.S. Army at Ft. Snelling, Minnesota on November 18, 1941 and served in the European, African and Middle East Theatres.  He was killed in action in Germany on March 31, 1945. He is buried at the Tuttle Cemetery, Tuttle, North Dakota. 

History of Reuben Ochsner is not available.

History

Membership

In a reply to a October 16, 1952 letter sent by Department Adjutant Jack Williams to Post 68 Commander Roy O. Benson, Commander Benson expounds on the difficulty the Post is experiencing to recruit Legionnaires. In his reply he states:

“Sorry to disappoint you but it seems impossible to interest young veterans in any organization, all they are interested in is any benefits which any organization can get for them.”

Post Officers/Membership

Post YearCommanderAdjutantMembership
1919   
1919-20Lennis T. BuckEarnest W. Atwood35
1920-21Dr. Clarence KernerRaymond Buck35
1921-22Post Disbanded  
    
1945-46John H. BaileyCurtis Swanson58
1946-47Elden ArusellHaaken Leland 
1947-48Post Disbanded  

Post 69 Flasher ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 69, Schafer-Boye-Lange Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Seventh District and located in Flasher, North Dakota.

Charter

The Schafer-Boye-Lange Post 69, initially the Flasher Post 69, received its national organizational charter on October 17, 1919. On October 29, 1920 the Post changed its name to the Tanner-Robinson Post 69. The Post disbanded and its charter was cancelled on June 15, 1925. The Post reorganized and received its national organizational charter as the Schafer-Boye-Lange Post 69 on February 21, 1946.

Namesake

The Post was initially named the Flasher Post.  in 1920, it was renamed Tanner-Robinson Post 69 after Horace Tanner and Paul Robinson,  

Horace Albert Tanner was born at Danville, Illinois on March 16, 1896.  He was inducted at Mandan, North Dakota on May 24, 1918.  He served overseas in France from July 6, 1918 until he was killed in action on June 9, 1919.  He was buried at the American Cemetery at LeMans, South France and re-interred On September 29, 1920 in Illinois.

Paul W. Robinson was born at North Adams, Mass. on January 27, 1894.  He enlisted in the Reserve Corps at Fort Lincoln, North Dakota on June 18, 1917.  He was a pharmacist.  He served at various stateside installations until he was sent overseas on February 18, 1918.  He died on April 22, 1919 of diphtheria laryngitis.  He is buried in Hillside Cemetery, North Adams, Mass.

On February 21, 1946, the Post received a new charter and re-named it the Schafer-Boye-Lange Post after Leo F. Schafer, Arland L. Boye and Herman E. Lange, all of whom made the supreme sacrifice during World War II.

Leo F. Schafer was born March 10, 1920 at Flasher, North Dakota.  He entered the United States Army on April 1, 1942 and served in the European, African and Middle East Theatres.  He was killed in Action on June 9, 1944 in France.  He is buried at Normandy France.  Arland L. Boye was born at Flasher, North Dakota on August 13, 1925.  He entered the United States Marine Corps on November 29, 1943 at Seattle, Washington.  He served in the Asiatic-Pacific Theatres and was killed in action on March 6, 1945 on Iwo Jima.  He was buried at the Ft. Snelling National Cemetery in St. Paul, Minnesota.  Herman F. Lange was born at Flasher, North Dakota on October 18, 196.  He entered the United States Army at Ft. Snelling, Minnesota on November 26, 1942.  He served in the European-African-Middle East Theatres and was killed in action on July 27, 1944 at Normandy France where is buried.

History

The first American Legion post in Flasher, ND, was known as Flasher Post 69 and was chartered October 17, 1919. Early in 1920, it was renamed Tanner-Robinson Post 69 after Horace Tanner and Paul Robinson, both of whom gave their lives while serving on the battlefields of France. Albert Boyer from the Flasher community also gave his life in World War I action in France.

Post membership declined due to hard times and many of the members moving out of the area. National headquarters of The American Legion cancelled the charter on June 15, 1925. The remaining members joined neighboring posts in Carson, Mandan, New Salem and Shields.

After World War II, interested veterans began meeting to reorganize the post in Flasher. Dues were collected from 27 members and submitted to department headquarters in January 1946. Application was made February 21, 1946, to renew the charter to be named Schafer-Boye-Lange Post 69 after Leo F. Schafer, Arland L. Boye and Herman E. Lange, all of whom made the supreme sacrifice during World War II. Of our 27 charter members, we still have Nicholas Kuntz, Warren Huncovsky, Cecil Huncovsky, Robert E. Stoddard, Irvin Sinclair and Edward Atkinson maintaining their membership with the Flasher post.

Leo F. Schafer entered the U.S. Army at Fort Snelling, MN, on April 1, 1942, and served in the European-African-Middle Eastern Theater. He was wounded in action during the Normandy invasion June 6, 1944, and died from these wounds three days later.

Arland L. Boye entered the U.S. Marine Corps in Seattle, WA, on November 29, 1943, and served in the Asiatic-Pacific Theater. He died March 6, 1945, on Iwo Jima.

Herman E. Lange entered the U.S. Army at Fort Snelling on November 26, 1942, and served in the European-African-Middle Eastern Theater. He was killed in action July 27, 1944, in Normandy, France.

Programs

The post held the usual fundraising methods of bingo, raffles, smokers, dances and carnivals. It also promoted and held boxing matches regularly during the late 1940s and early 1950s. A boxing ring was set up in the Flasher Memorial Hall, which could seat as many as 200 spectators. The post also held open air matches during the summer months.

Members volunteered to operate a movie theater in the Flasher Memorial Hall from the late 1950s through the early 1970s. When gaming became legal, our Legion post was one of the first to obtain a gaming license. Games of chance were operated in the Memorial Hall, My Place Bar and Meyer’s Cafe and Lounge, all in

Flasher. The volunteers who operated these activities enabled us to support the many activities we finance in the Flasher community.

The surplus funds from operating the movie theater and the gaming operations were invested, and today the investment interest helps us continue supporting them.

Post 190 of Shields, ND, was named after Ross Chapman, who gave his life in France. The post was organized on May 7, 1920. Dan Panko, a charter member of the original Flasher post, was a member of the Shields community and helped organize the post. A permanent charter was dated October 29, 1920.

After several years of dwindling membership, the post decided to move its headquarters from Shields to Selfridge, effective December 30, 1929. A letter to department headquarters dated July 24, 1941, indicates the post was called Ross Chapman Post 190 of Shields and Selfridge.

The post managed to survive through the Depression and the Dirty 1930s by hosting pie and basket socials followed by dances. These socials helped pay The American Legion membership dues for those who couldn’t afford them.

Membership again increased after World War II for the Ross Chapman post at Shields. But, by the middle 1950s, interest in The American Legion at Shields had dwindled. It was noted that most of the members were from the Raleigh area west of Shields. Then at the regular meeting on September 26, 1956, a motion was made and carried that Post 190 be moved from Shields to Raleigh.

A permanent charter was issued to Post 190 with a new location at Raleigh.

Membership did increase for a time. However, in the summer of 1966, the officers and members of Post 190 voted to dissolve the post because it could not maintain the minimum 15-member requirement. They deeded The American Legion Hall in Raleigh to the Raleigh Gun Club.

The remaining Legion members when the post was dissolved were given life memberships in the Raleigh Gun Club. The post charter was cancelled on August 28, 1966, by national headquarters.

Most of the remaining membership transferred their membership to Flasher Post 69 as Flasher is only nine miles from Raleigh. Many current members of Post 69 were members of Post 190 or had ancestors who belonged to Post 190.

Located in the Flasher community, which had a population of 317 according to the 1990 census, Schafer-Boye-Lange Post 69 has maintained a membership of 100 to 120 in the last 30 years. It reached its all-time high of 120 members in 1981.

The success of our American Legion post can be attributed to pride that exists within our membership. It is not uncommon to have 15-20 blue-capped Legionnaires fall out for Memorial Day or for a military funeral honoring a departed comrade.

Our Legion post honors deceased comrades at 10 area cemeteries on Memorial Day. Through the years, most of these same members have volunteered their time to fulfill the projects we have undertaken.

Post Home

The Flasher Memorial Hall is the home of Schafer-Boye-Lange Post 69. The flag pole was donated by the Schafer family in memory of Leo F. Schafer for whom our post was named.

Unit 69 Ladies Auxiliary

Our Schafer-Boye-Lange Unit 69 Ladies Auxiliary also is very active in the Flasher community. Our Auxiliary is very supportive of the projects our American Legion post takes on. The ladies help with gaming and with meals we host when we have our fundraisers. We, in turn, help them finance some of their projects such as sending candidates to Girls State.

Post 70 Hatton ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 70, Carrol O. Fleshe Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, First District and located in Hatton, North Dakota.

Charter

The Carrol O. Fleshe Post 70 received its national organizational charter on October 17, 1919.

Namesake

Carrol O. Fleshe was born in Portland, North Dakota on December 14, 1891.  He was inducted at Sherbrooke, North Dakota on September 21, 1917.  He served overseas in France from April 25, 1918 until he was killed in action on October 8, 1918.  He is buried in the American Cemetery at Meuse-Argonne France.

Post 71 Mott ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 1, Taylor-Skartvedt Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Eighth District and located in Mott, North Dakota.

Charter

The Taylor-Skartvedt Post 71, initially the William C. Taylor Post 71 received its national organizational charter on October 17, 1919. On February 25, 1946 the Post changed its name to the Taylor-Skartvedt Post 71.

Namesake

William C. Taylor-No Information available.  Richard P. Skartvedt was born in Litchfield, Minnesota on March 5, 1921.  He entered the United States Army on February 10, 1941 at Dickinson, North Dakota.  He served in the Asiatic-Pacific Theatre and was killed in action on January 4, 1943 on Guadalcanal.  He is buried at the Ft. Rosecrans National Cemetery at San Diego, California.

The American Legion’s Post 71 at Mott was organized in 1919, with H.M. Robbins as its first commander. It was named in honor of William C. Taylor, the first soldier from Hettinger County to lose his life in World War I. In 1946, the name was changed to Taylor-Skartvedt, the first area citizen to lose his life in World War II.

History

The first meetings were held at the Masonic Hall on the second floor of the Commercial Bank building. When the new Courthouse was built in 1935, a fine Veterans Hall was provided and has since been the meeting place for our post and Auxiliary unit, also the scene of many civic and social activities which the Legion has sponsored.

In 1939, Dr. T.L. Stangebye declared he was unable to run for the office of department commander for the ensuing year. He stated he was unable to accept the honor at that time but, in 1943, conditions were favorable for him to seek that office. Stangebye was elected to the 1943-44 department commandership—the only state commander our post has had. Some of our members have also served graciously in the offices of district commander and department vice-commander for the western region. Their names are published elsewhere in this book.

Throughout the years, The American Legion took “for the good of the community” as its motto. Here are a few ways that American Legion Post 71 has carried out this motto and showed concern for all:

December 8, 1941 – Discussion centered on the collage of flags representing nations aligned against German aggression in World War I, which had been displayed for many years on the wall in the Legion’s meeting room. Among the flags in the group was one of Japan’s Rising Sun. The surprise attack on the U.S. military bases at Pearl Harbor the previous day by Japanese warplanes provoked the ire of area citizens.  Understandably, it was decided to remove the collage at once but, for historic reasons, it was not destroyed.

April 30, 1942 – War bonds and stamps sales were discussed, and Hettinger County’s quota for May has been set at $15,100. With a county population of 7,500, it was viewed that there should be little trouble in reaching that quota. The group was also informed that up to May 1st, there had been approximately $2,400 of war bonds purchased in North Dakota.

May 28, 1943 – A farewell party was held for Comrade Hugh Auer who was the first member of the post to enlist in the present war.

October 14, 1943 – The post extended its thanks to the Board of County Commissioners for 1ts action in withdrawing all county owned land for sale until after the war, such land to be held for the benefit of armed forces personnel returning home after the war.

September 1944 – The members discussed post-war problems and rehabilitation of returning veterans.

May 1947 – In making plans for Memorial Day this year, a recommendation was implemented to conduct a ceremony at the river in honor of those dead who gave their lives at sea. Attendees marched from the school, after the services, to the dam where a wreath was dropped on the water. This practice has been continued to date.

In scanning the history of Post 71 at Mott, it is interesting to note that in 1942 there was discussion about the proper procedure in saluting the flag, much like the need for reemphasis of flag etiquette today. Child welfare issues arose in 1942, but not much has changed since then. The important topic of membership was discussed at great length then, same as today.

A money-making project, which we have sponsored since April 1987, is the calf and pig raffle. Initially, the calf tickets were priced at $5, the pig tickets at $3 and 100 tickets each were printed. Prizes were $250 for calf and $125 for pig. In March 1988, the ticket prices were changed to $10 for calf and $5 for pig. The prizes were increased to $500 for calf and $200 for pig. This raffle is the post’s only money maker at the present time.

Mott Legionnaires have been very industrious in carrying out their civic duties. Here are only a few projects: Members work diligently at promoting their community; getting funds for the swimming pool; fundraising for flood victims; cancer, polio and March of Dimes, crippled children drives; donations to loan closet; instrumental in promoting new armory; donating flags to schools; donations to nursing home; take part in funerals; march in parades; sponsor youth to Boys State, music camps, Special Olympics, Boy Scouts and baseball.

Some other youth programs the post supports are Eighth Grade Scholastic Award; Free Throw percentage trophies for boys and girls basketball, oratorical contest, drug safety and Get-Out-and-Vote contest. The list goes on and on.

One of the post’s many projects was this memorial erected in 1971 at the Legion Park in Mott, where deceased veterans are listed monthly.

On the state and local levels, the post obtained petition signatures to restore the Veterans Post-War Trust Fund.

On the national level, Post 71 is still trying to convince our Senators to vote for the flag amendment.

We members of American Legion Post 71 at Mott are proud of the men and women who have served their country, not only during their military service but also continuing to serve America as loyal citizens throughout their lifetime. The American Legion has built character in each of us and has challenged us to continue to live up to the part of the preamble which says, “for the good of the community, state and nation.”

Post 72 Napoleon

The North Dakota American Legion Post 72, Barry-Hoof Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Fifth District and located in Napoleon, North Dakota.

Charter

The Barry-Hoof Post 72 received its national organizational charter on October 17, 1919.

Namesake

Grover Cleveland Barry

Grover Cleveland Barry was the second eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel M. Barry, who homesteaded in Logan County. Grover was born on the family farm northwest and within sight of Napoleon. His father was an Army captain who served in the Civil War. Grover died November 4, 1917, a victim of a German gas attack.

Charles Viet Hoof

Charles Veit Hoof was the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Hoof, who homesteaded a mile southeast of town.

Charles was born in a house on what still is known as the Hoof homestead. An Army private, Hoof went to France with Company G of the 138th Infantry in the spring of 1918. He was mortally wounded in the Argonne Forest on September 29, 1918, by shrapnel from a high-explosive shell. His grandfather, Julius H. Hoof, was a veteran of the Crimean War in 1854. The Barrys and Hoofs were among Logan County’s earliest settlers in 1885.

History

Barry-Hoof Post 72 at Napoleon was issued a charter October 17, 1919. It was named in honor of two well-known and highly-respected young men born within one mile of town. They made the supreme sacrifice in World War I Army service in France.

The following are credited as being charter members of Barry-Hoof Post 72: M.C. Houser, C.W. Skogley, F.L. Weibusch, Otis F. Bryant Jr., E.G. Schuchard, Edgar F. Houser, R.A. Schuette, Arthur Kane, O.J. Prigge, H.D. Weibusch, Fred Norling, A.R. Button, J.G. Daschle, O.C. Adams and Bennie Zahn. In addition to the above named members, the following names also appear as having paid dues in the year 1919-1920: John Simon, M.D., Alfred W. Junge, John A. Anderson, Adam Kroeber, Frank Glatt, Stefen Burgad, Edwin Carlsten, Sever Nord, L.O. Davenport, Jake Bauer, Sam B. Gooding and L.R. Towne.

Membership

Barry-Hoof Post from its beginning has always had a strong post, membership-wise. In its first year, it had 23 members out of a possible 27, which information was obtained from The Legionnaire, the official publication of The American Legion in North Dakota in 1919. In the second issue of the magazine, Napoleon sponsored a full page advertisement, made possible by the cooperation of the Barry-Hoof Post and progressive business and professional men.

Ever since the birth of The American Legion on the battle-scarred fields of France in March 1919, it has remained a non-political, non-sectarian organization. Membership is always voluntary. Nobody’s job depends on it, nobody’s profession is furthered by it, and nobody is coerced to join. Barry-Hoof Post’s membership is always high, with an average of 200. The post has aided the growth and development of Napoleon and has become deeply involved in the welfare of the community.

Programs

The American Legion baseball program was started at Napoleon in 1931. The post purchased balls, bats and other equipment and 14 business firms provided suits for the teams. Forty boys took part in the program under the guidance of Glenn Benshoof and Lou Davenport. Legion baseball is today one of the Legion’s finest programs.

In 1935 Barry-Hoof Post was awarded the Mack V. Traynor membership trophy. This traveling trophy has been the possession of the post several times since, for its splendid membership.

It sponsors American Legion, Babe Ruth and Pee Wee baseball programs, Boys State and Music Camp. It has made generous contributions to the Professional Fund, Nursing Home, Park Board, Medical Clinic and Swimming Pool. The Post has donated thousands of dollars to various programs since its gaming program was started. The strength of the Legion is always found in its posts and their innumerable humble activities for American society. J. Edgar Hoover, former director of the F.B.I., said that “No other lay organization has done more for law and order, national security and the moral health of the nation than the Legion.”

Barry-Hoof Post has had four department officers, all who served as Fifth District commanders: H.A. McNutt, Elmer J. Dewald, Joe Burgad and Dennis Hottman. Barry-Hoof Post has an honor guard for participation in funerals, parades and other events. The flag of the U.S. is flown at The American Legion Hall, both day and night, when the flag is lit by flood lights.

Post Home

The activities of the post in its first year were held in Shafer’s Hall, later in Couture’s Hall and Houser Hall. The Houser Hall is now Joe’s Place. In the year 1936 the post acquired an old light plant building which was attached to a blacksmith and warehouse building, and later a lumber yard. As the membership grew larger, it became necessary to provide larger and improved facilities. While plans were formulated and various fundraising activities carried on, the post meetings were held in the Gold Room of the Miller Hotel, the Blue Room in the Gem Cafe and the meeting rooms of the Octagon.

In 1953, a site was purchased from Alex Kelsch and a building was completed in 1954 on the site. The Legion had shared in the Logan County Memorial Fund in the amount of $16,000. This, plus money donations, and donated labor by Legionnaires and the Vet Class (enrolled in a farm class), brought in enough funds to complete the building. This building was later sold to Mr. and Mrs. Martin Nolz for $17,000. This building no longer served the needs of the community, so the post went through the same procedure, and with fund solicitations, donated labor and a loan from Stock Growers Bank, the present 60 x 123-foot building was completed in 1980.

Much credit is owed to the original building committee: Andy Gross, John A. Fettig, Marvin Schnabel, Melbert Kemmet and Sam Piatz. Total cost of the building was $177,249. Monetary donations amounted to $50,000; a $50,000 loan was secured, and $17,000 was received from the sale of the old building. Many valuable hours of labor were donated. The building serves many groups and functions. It is certainly a permanent memorial to all war veterans. A mortgage burning ceremony for the new building was held November 13, 1990.

Post Commanders

Post YearPost Commander
1919Marion C. Houser
1920L.O. Davenport
1921C.H. Kelson
1922C.F. Phillips
1923-25J. Arthur Solien
1926Otis F. Bryant, Jr.
1927O.J. France
1928-29R.R. Richmond
1930Alfred Junge
1931Otis Bryant
1932Edward Carlsten
1933I.F. Wagner
1934-35H.A. McNutt
1936-37Oscar J. France
1938Ed Ulrich
1939-40Fred Norling
1941-42Oscar J. France
1943Frank Glatt
1944-45Gideon Bauer
1946C. Francis Swanke
1947Vance E. Kroeber
1948Walter Wentz
1949Edward Kramer
1950John J. Kambeitz
1951James Babcock
1951Lynn J. Fuller
1952Vernon H. Baltzer
1953Joseph Schneider
1954Ted C, Frank
1955Elmer J. Dewald
1956Frank Simon
1957Raymond Bauer
1958Anthony Geffre
1959Howard E. Holsti
1960John J. Kuhn
1961L.A. Bitz
1962-63Sebastian Schwartzenberger
1964-65Norbert H. Mueller
1966-67Richard Schwartzenberger
1968Earl Heck
1969Kerdell Wittmier
1970Joseph Burgad
1971Gordon O. Hoberg
1972John A. Fettig
1973W.T. Dillenberg
1974Baltzer Wald
1975Stanley Doll
1976Andy Gross
1977Dennis Hottman
1978Melbert Kemmet
1979Duane Geffre
1980Mike Welder, Jr.
1981James J. Hilzendeger
1982Joe Wolf
1982-83Leo Wolf
1984Joe Becker
1985Anton Horner
1986Donald Schumacher
1987Marvin Wolf
1988John Gross
1989Charles Hamel
1990Ross Kleppe
1991Robert Hammond
1992Anton Leier
1993Ben Vetsch
1994Mike Horner

Barry-Hoof American Legion Auxiliary Unit 72

Ever since the partnership was formed between The American Legion and Auxiliary in 1920, the two organizations have been bonded together by years of sacrifice, caring and above all, mutual respect.

The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 72 was organized in March 1920. Charter members were Esther Billigmeier,

Mrs. O. F. Bryant, Mrs. Charles Hoof, Maude Hoof, Blanche Houser, Mrs. M.C. Hauser, Hannah Kane, Mary Kane, Nellie Kane, Mrs. George Schuchard, and Mrs. Joe Weibusch.

Current membership is 135. Mrs. Lillian Hoime, Pollock, SD, and Mrs. Rebecca France, Mesa, AZ, are the only living spouses whose husbands were World War I veterans.

It hasn’t been easy for the nearly one million members of the Auxiliary. In their private lives they are doctors, lawyers, housewives, factory workers, retirees, mayors and governors, among other professions.

Perhaps they do not receive the recognition they deserve because they’ve never used a “rolling pin” to get media attention. Or maybe it’s because they get all the reward they need from watching the smiling faces of our nation’s children.

Whatever the reason, two things are certain: The American Legion has a partner that would make every one proud … and this country is a better place because of the American Legion Auxiliary.

The main source of income for the Napoleon American Legion Auxiliary is from coat checking at various functions at the Legion Hall.

Post 73 Litchville ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 73, Martin Jacobson Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, First District and located in Litchville, North Dakota.

Charter

The Martin Jacobson Post 73 received its national organizational charter October 28, 1919. The Charter members were Carl A. Platou, Fred C. Songberg, Henry B. Offerdahl, Earl T. E. Stixrud, Alex Stroeder, T. J. Kinneberg, Willie A. Wenneson, George A. Wenneson, Emanuel Kolke, Everet Boeltjes, Harry Evenson, W. A. anderson, Eddie P. Haarsager, Herman Rietman, and F. N. Kinservik. The Post disbanded and its charter cancelled on May 17, 1928.

Namesake

Martin A. Jacobson was born in Drag, Norway in May 1886.  He enlisted in the North Dakota National Guard at Fargo, North Dakota on July 2, 1917 and was called into Federal service on July 15, 1917.  He served overseas in France from December 15, 1917 and was killed in action on July 18, 1918.  He was buried in the American Cemetery Serings-et-Nesles, Aisne France.

History

Post Officers/Membership

Post YearCommanderAdjutantMembership
1919  37
1919-20Carl Z. PlatouT. J. Kinneberg28
1920-21Carl Z. PlatouT. J. Kinneberg33
1921-22Carl Z. PlatouT. J. Kinneberg 
1922-23Carl Z. PlatouT. J. Kinneberg 
1923-24Dr. J. G. BennettT. J. Kinneberg 
1924-25Harry EversonT. J. Kinneberg16
1925-26Post Disbanded  

Post 74 Leonard

The North Dakota American Legion Post 74, Nelson-Elliott Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, First District and located in Leonard, North Dakota.

Charter

The Nelson-Elliott Post 74, initial the Albert Nelson Post 74, received its national organizational charter on October 28, 1919. On June 12, 1946 the Post renamed itself the Nelson-Elliot Post 74.

Namesake

Albert Franklin Nelson was born in Milnor, North Dakota on August 5, 1890.  He enlisted in the North Dakota National Guard at Wahpeton, North Dakota on June 2, 1917 and was called into Federal Service on July 15, 1917.  He served overseas in France from December 15, 1917 until he was killed in action on July 19, 1918.  He was initially buried in France and later interred in Leonard, North Dakota.  He was awarded, among other awards and decorations, the Silver Star.  Byron G. Elliott was born in Leonard, North Dakota September 30, 1921.  He entered the United States Army on September 16, 1940.  He was killed in action at Hickam Field, Hawaii on December 7, 1941.  He was buried at the National Memorial of the Pacific Cemetery, Hawaii.

Post 75 Crosby ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 75, William Perry Makee Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Ninth District and located in Crosby, North Dakota.

Charter

The William Perry Makee Post 75 received its national organizational charter on October 28, 1919.

Namesake

William Perry Makee was born at Portal, North Dakota on May 1, 1897.  He enlisted in the North Dakota National Guard on October 1, 1917 and served overseas in France from December 15, 1917 until he was killed in action on September 26, 1918.  He was initially buried in France and later interred at Kenmare, North Dakota.  He also served with the North Dakota National Guard from April 10, 1914 to February 14, 1917 during the Mexican border war.

Post 76 Timmer ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 76, Timmer Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Fifth District and located in Timmer, North Dakota.

Charter

The Timmer Post 76 received its national organizational charter on October 23, 1919. Due to lack of membership and the closing of the local bank, the Post disbanded and its charter was cancelled on June 15, 1925.

Namesake

Named after the town of Timmer.

History

PositionName
CommanderAlbert K. Krueger
Vice CommnaderV. W. Ceeley
Finance OfficerThomas Henry Brown
AdjutantPaul O. Kruger
ChaplainGeorge Barth
HistorianC. C. Weimels

Post 77 Pembina

The North Dakota American Legion Post 77, Kern-Thompson Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, Second District and located in Pembina, North Dakota.

Charter

The Kern-Thompson Post 77, initally the Pembina Post 77, received its national organizational charter on October 28, 1919.

Namesake

Charles Edward Kern was born in Pembina, North Dakota on July 16, 1894.  He was inducted at Cavalier, North Dakota on May 27, 1918.  He served in France from July 6, 1918 with Company B, 362nd Infantry.  He was killed in action on September 29, 1918.  He was buried in the American Cemetery, Meuse-Argonne France. 

Thompson-can’t identify

Post 78 Stanton ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 78, Vernon V. Isaacs Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Seventh District and located in Stanton, North Dakota.

Charter

The Vernon V. Isaacs 78 received its national organizational charter on October 28, 1919.

Namesake

Vernon V. Isaacs was born October 7, 1889.  He entered the United States military on June 5, 1917 from Stanton, North Dakota until he was killed in action on November 2, 1918.  He is buried in the Oakland Cemetery, Forest City, Iowa.

Post 79 Cando ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 79, Hal Parker Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Third District and located in Cando, North Dakota.

Charter

The Hal Parker Post 79 received its national organizational charter on October 28, 1919.

Namesake

Harold (Hal) Maloy Parker was born in Cando, North Dakota on January 18, 1896.  He served in France from May 3, 1918 until he was killed in action on September 26, 1918.  He was buried in France and later interred in Cando, North Dakota.

History

A meeting for the organization of World War I veterans into an American Legion post was called at Cando on May 12, 1919, by the draft board that consisted of John Kehoe, J. E. Hunter and James Taylor. Similar meetings were arranged around the county with the hope of organizing several posts. Hal Parker Post #79 was issued its charter on October 28, 1919, Charter members were Vine Lord, Ray Powell, A.W. Harder, George Moylan, Bernard Cleary, Dundas Hunter, Roy Morris, Bertram Jones, H. L. Joiner, Albert Bodelson, Van Carmichael, James Wiggins, Ed Canfield, Conrad Jorgenson and C.P. Morrison.

Bernard Cleary was elected the first commander. Though all was not smooth sailing for the new organization, it continued to expand, despite only a few meetings being held the first year because of the flu epidemic. Meetings were held in the clubroom over the First National Bank on Main Street.

Post Home

In 1921, a movement was started by the post to obtain a Memorial Building and a National Guard unit. These dreams came true when the Guard unit was started in 1923, and the Memorial Building was dedicated on November 11, 1927, as a fitting memorial to the servicemen of Towner County. Clubroom facilities for the Legion were provided in the new structure.

In 1955, the post along with Towner County Commissioners checked into the possibility of getting a new National Guard Armory. With much work, along with the local Guard unit and county and city governments, this became a reality. The post obtained the lots for the armory and donated them to the county. Some local money was needed for this project. The post donated 30 per cent of this money and, in return, received a rent-free meeting room.

The post along with our American Legion Auxiliary unit spent many thousands of dollars and provided much hard work to convert this space into the beautiful clubrooms that we have today.

40 et 8

On July 24, 1922, a charter was granted to Towner County for Voiture Locale 320 of the 40 et 8 ‘s parent Grand Voiture du North Dakota. Later, this voiture was disbanded.

Post Activities

Activities of the post have been many and varied, including sponsorship of Memorial Day programs, movie week, carnivals, plays, dances, Golden Glove boxing, essay contests, independent basketball, American Legion baseball, Boys State, Boy Scouts, youth hockey and donations to many community projects.

The post started a movement for an indoor skating rink and swimming pool. The skating rink was built in the late 1930s, but the swimming pool did not happen until 1951.

Post sport highlights are the three-time state champion basketball team of 1928- 1930. Our Legion baseball teams have earned a place in the state tournament several times. Our Golden Glove heavyweight boxer, Wendell Uthke, advanced to the semifinals in the national tournament at Chicago. Our post bowlers have won the state team doubles, singles and all events championships over the years. And our youth hockey teams have won the state championship.

Our post has an active firing squad and color guard that perform at activities such as military funerals, Memorial Day, Veterans Day and many local and out-of-town parades.

Through the years our post has raised many thousands of dollars through bingo, black jack, pull tabs, smokers and raffles with the proceeds going toward helping local government, all kinds of community projects, youth programs and other charities. This figure has reached about a quarter of a million dollars.

The post has been very active in community activities, heading drives and donating many thousands of dollars to these projects. Included are two new swimming pools; and on the school grounds, a new baseball field, grandstand, dugouts and lights. A paved track was put around the football field for the track team. The post worked hard in paving the way for an all-seasons arena, this being done when the old skating rink had to come down. Any project that needed money and local labor to complete the task, our post has been at the top of the list with donations and manpower to get the job done. Working hand-in-hand with the Cando Fire Department and the Towner County Ambulance Service, our post assisted these organizations in procuring life-saving equipment as well as supplies needed for life-saving classes. Many Legionnaires are members of both groups.

The Legion post has conducted Monday night bingo since the late 1970s. This program has been turned over to the Auxiliary. Our money raisers have been fun nights and raffles instead of pull-tab and black jack gaming.

Over the years, a good part of our charitable money has gone to youth programs such as youth and American Legion baseball, youth hockey programs, Boys State, Future Homemakers of America, Future Farmers of America, 4-H Club programs, International Music Camp scholarships, Junior Rifle programs, plus others. We have also donated money to all the churches in Cando for needy people.

The post has hosted the North Dakota American Legion State Bowling Tournament a few times. The post also hosted the Class B American Legion Baseball Tournament, the Junior Rifle State Tournament and the Youth Hockey State Tournament.

Service Beyond the Post

Three members have held state offices: Father John McHugh was Third District Commander and Department Chaplain; Harley Volden was Third District Commander, and George Freund was Third District Commander and Department Vice-Commander for the Central Region.

Membership

Membership in our post hit its peak in the early 1950s with a high of 247. Our 1994 membership is down to 150 members.

Officers serving our post during its 75th anniversary year are Harold Holien, commander; Lewis Getz, first vice-commander; Ed Fritel, second vice-commander; LeRoy Hoffert, finance officer; George Freund, adjutant; Harley Volden, chaplain; Jack Freund, service officer; Andy Isaacson, historian, and Simon Laturnus, sergeant-at-arms.

Our post has had 61 commanders, 18 adjutants and 19 finance officers. Andrew Isaacson has been historian since 1959.

Finance officers were Harley Volden, 20 years; Lawrence Shepperd, 11 years, and LeRoy Hoffert since 1986. Adjutants were Harry Harder, 11 years; Ted Baker, 8 years, and George Freund since 1965

Post 80/235 Rolla ND.

The North Dakota American Legion Post 80, Fred C. Wagner Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Third District and located in Rolla, North Dakota.

Charter

The Fred C. Wagner Post received its national organizational charter on October 28, 1919. The Post disbanded and its charter was cancelled on June 15, 1925. The Post reorganized as the Fred C. Wagner Post 235. It received it subsequent national organizational charter on June 8, 1926.

Namesake

Frederick Calvin Wagner was born in Rolla, North Dakota on May 9, 1897.  He enlisted in the United States Marine Corps on May 11, 1917.  He served overseas in France from June 8, 1918 until he was killed in action on July 19, 1918. On September 17, 1918, during the particularly vicious battle of Meuse-Argonne in “The Great War” (curiously, that’s what it almost universally was called before World War Il began in 1939), 19-year-old Private Fred Wagner twice went out into No-Man’s Land and rescued wounded comrades. On his third try he himself ran out of luck and became a member of “The Post Everlasting.”

History

Frederick Calvin Wagner Post No. 235 of The American Legion, Department of North Dakota, always has revered the proud record of the man for whom we are named.

To the best of our knowledge, Fred Wagner never was recommended for what he clearly should have had: a posthumous Congressional Medal of Honor. As every combat vet knows, war is not only unfair in determining who lives and who dies, but so also in the distribution of recognition on the battlefield.

Yet here in Rolla we gave Fred Wagner the honor he probably would value the most: Everyone who drives past the corner of First Street and Third Avenue sees the large red-white-and-blue sign on the front of our post home – known locally as “The Legion Cabin” proclaiming our rustic log structure as “Fred C. Wagner Post No. 235, The American Legion.”

Unlike most Legion posts, ours has not had an unbroken history. Born of the ferver following victory over “the Huns” on Armistice Day, November 11, 1918, it was chartered as Post No. 80, Rolla-Saint John, the following April and promptly elected Dr. Bernard D. Verret, who as Major B. D. Verret was an Army surgeon in France six months earlier, as the first post commander.

Things boomed at first, but we lacked a post home and by the late 1920’s the organization had ground to a halt and ceased to exist. By 1932 the infamous Great Depression was upon the land and The American Legion’s push for immediate payment of “The Great War” bonus that had been scheduled for payment in 1945 (how ironic it is that 1945 was destined to mark the end of World War II.

This campaign did wonders for The Legion’s $3 membership drive, and in 1932 the erstwhile Fred C. Wagner Post No. 80 was re-born as Post No. 235, (subsequently Saint John chartered its own post, which still exists).

To the best of our knowledge, Fred Wagner never was recommended for what he clearly should have had: a posthumous Congressional Medal of Honor. As every combat vet knows, war is not only unfair in determining who lives and who dies, but so also in the distribution of recognition on the battlefield.

Yet here in Rolla we gave Fred Wagner the honor he probably would value the most: Everyone who drives past the corner of First Street and Third Avenue sees the large red-white-and-blue sign on the front of our post home – known locally as “The Legion Cabin” proclaiming our rustic log structure as “Fred C. Wagner Post No. 235, The American Legion.”

Unlike most Legion posts, ours has not had an unbroken history. Born of the ferver following victory over “the Huns” on Armistice Day, November 11, 1918, it was chartered as Post No. 80, Rolla-Saint John, the following April and promptly elected Dr. Bernard D. Verret, who as Major B. D. Verret was an Army surgeon in France six months earlier, as the first post commander.

Things boomed at first, but we lacked a post home and by the late 1920’s the organization had ground to a halt and ceased to exist.

By 1932 the infamous Great Depression was upon the land and The American Legion’s push for immediate payment of “The Great War” bonus that had been scheduled for payment in 1945 (how ironic it is that 1945 was destined to mark the end of World War II).

That enthusiasm carried over into construction of the original portion of “The Legion Cabin” in 1934. In 1975 the size of the cabin was more than doubled, with the final payment on that debt being made on April 17, 1980.

That enlargement made possible the best and least-expensive middle-class “night out” in all of Rolette County: the once-a-month Saturday night Legion Steak Fry (still just $8 per person). Tradition has it that the husbands cook the steaks on our large, modern electric grill while the wives have a drink and enjoy themselves.

A crew of Legionnaires comes in at I p.m. on Saturday afternoon to set the tables, chop up the heads of lettuce for the salad, and lovingly wrap each potato in aluminum foil before it is put into the oven to bake.

The all-made comraderie is marvelous (it’s a great time to tell war stories) and guys who wouldn’t dream of cooking more than an occasional hamburger (if that) at home hugely enjoy this type of “KP.” As our “piece d’resistance,” we feature Legionnaire Larry Slunaker’s secretrecipe mushroom steak sauce. Larry died suddenly of a coronary at age 75 in 1990, but-anticipating the inevitable for all of us – before his death he passed the secret recipe into the hands of Neill Manning, one of our all-too-few Viet Nam-era Legionnaires.

In addition to participating in usual Legion activities ( Legion baseball, the oratorical contest, etc.), we are proud that in the face of public disdain for patriotism, we not only have kept our Memorial Day cemetery services (five cemeteries), parade, and speaking programs going, but as of 1989 we revfived a custon that had begun right after W II but had died out during the Viet Name conflicet; We once again invited members of the Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 25, and their Ladies Auxiliary in Killarney, Manitoba to join us in the parade, the program, and the traditional “legion Feed” at the cabin following the program.

In reciprocity, The Royal Canadian Legion now invites us to join them in observance of their solemn “Decoration Day” service on the second Sunday in June each year. One has to see those Canadian vets and their ladies in their-distinctive, colorful uniforms to appreciate how much they add to an event. Friendships have sprung up between Canadian Legionnaires and American Legionnaires that otherwise would not exist.   

Rolla Auxiliary Aids Legion Programs

The Fred C. Wagner American Legion Auxiliary Unit 235 was organized on January 28, 1931, with 26 charter members. Our permanent charter was granted March 16, 1931. Meetings are held the first Wednesday of each month. The Auxiliary supports the Legion in many ways. We take part in the Memorial Day program and prepare and serve the food for the Veterans Day supper. We take part in flag presentations at our school; are active in the poppy poster campaign, distributing poppies to support disabled veterans; sponsor delegates to Flickertail Girls State; and make baskets for shut-ins. We offer scholarships each year to college students.

Many volunteer hours are spent on community projects. Over the years, our Auxiliary has been very active on the local, district, and state levels. A Junior Auxiliary was organized in March 1991. They help with poppy distribution, deliver Christmas Cheer baskets, serve for steak fries, etc. Our membership today is 108 Senior and 34 Junior members. Sadly, there are no charter members still living in our unit. –Esther (Mrs. Paul) Krumweide

Post 81 Kathryn ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 81, Knut Berg Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Easter Region, First District and located in Kathryn, North Dakota.

Charter

On October 21, 1919, eighteen veterans from the Kathryn, ND community gathered to organize an American Legion Post. The Knut Berg Post 81 received its national organizational charter on October 28, 1919.

Namesake

Knut Berg was born in Tunset, Norway on November 15, 1889.  He became a naturalized citizen and joined the North Dakota National Guard on July 12, 1917.  He was called onto active duty on July 15, 1917.  He served overseas from December 15, 1917 to February 11, 1919 when he was wounded in action.  He was discharged at Fort Snelling, Minnesota on July 30, 1919 due to disabilities incurred in combat in France.  He passed away in 1921 from complications resulting from injuries he received while he was in the service.

History

They elected the following officers:

The Post disbanded and its charter was cancelled on October 8, 1950.

Post Officers/Membership

Post YearCommanderAdjutantMembership
1919  26
1919-20J. O. JensenVernon Edward Mikkelson26
1920-21Arthur AbrahamsonHarry Davidson27
1921-22Harold OlsonJ. O. Jensen15
1922-23Harold OlsonJ. O. Jensen 
1923-24Anders StrotroenJ. O. Jensen15
1924-25Gust J. JohannesonAnders Stortroen 
1925-26Christ H. JohnsonAnders Strotroen 
1926-27C. H. JohnsonR. R. Skaarer18
1927-28Gust JohannesonArthur Abrahamson 
1928-29Gust JohannesonArthur Abrahamson 
1929-30Gust JohannesonArthur Abrahamson 
1930-31C. H. JohnsonG. L. Larson 
1931-32Post Disbanded  

Post 82 Forman ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 82, Sargent Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, Tenth District and located in Forman, North Dakota.

Charter

The Sargent Post 82 received its national organizational charter on October 30, 1919.

Namesake

Apparently is named for the county Forman resides in.

Post 83

The North Dakota American Legion Post 83, Peterson-Swenson Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, First District and located in Nome, North Dakota.

Charter

The Person-Swenson Post 83, initially named the Nome Post 83, received its national organizational charter on October 30, 1919. The Post disbanded and its charter was cancelled on June 15, 1925. The Post reorganized at the Peterson-Swenson Post 83 and received its subsequent national charter on September 28, 1949.

Namesake

Possibly named after Russell K. Person who was born August 22, 1921 in Litchville, North Dakota.  He served in the United States Army from July 12, 1943 to February 21, 1946.  It could also be Leonard S. Person a WW I veteran.  Palmer G. Swenson was born at Nome, North Dakota on April 27, 1921.  He enlisted in the United States Army on July 22, 1943.  He served in the European, African and Middle East theatres.  He was Killed in Action on November 30, 1944 at Lindeman, Germany.  He is buried in a family plot at the St. Petri Cemetery in Nome.

Post 84 Lidgerwood ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 84, Ward E. Bullis Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, Tenth District and located in Lidgerwood, North Dakota.

Charter

The Ward E. Bullis Post 84 received its national organizational charter on October 30, 1919.

Chartered on October 30, 1919; 16 signers of the document named their post in honor and memory of Pvt. Ward E. Bullis, age 20, United States Marine Corps, 6th Regiment. The Post’s first Commander was Charles Clarke.

Namesake

Ward Elon Bullis was born at Luverne, Minnesota on June 3, 1898.  He enlisted in the United States Marine Corps at Lidgerwood, North Dakota on May 12, 1917.  He served in France from October 6, 1917.  He was gassed in action on June 14, 1918 and wounded October 9, 1918.  He subsequently died of his wounds on October 13, 1918.  Bullis was wounded three times before his death at Soissons, France; the unit was awarded the “Croix de Guerre” with palm. He had the distinguished honor of being the grandson of Gen. John J. Logan, the commander of the Grand Army of the Republic in 1868. 

History

Early Membership

In 1920 the membership increased to 64 and the main fundraising event was the annual Armistice eve dance.

In the next few years the ladies of the Auxiliary cooked the evening meal and served it to their husbands and sweethearts as a midnight feast at the conclusion of the dance. Community service was not yet in evidence and post activity was slow in getting organized.

The 1920 years were times when the post sponsored anything for a few dollars: such as films down at the local Lyric Theatre, public dances, card parties, basketball games and plays that included in the cast a few of the Auxiliary gals. Contributions of $100 to the local library fund and $425 to the Legion’s National Endowment Fund that helped disabled veterans were some of the larger donations expended.

Mary Walker of the Auxiliary, who was a music teacher and composer, dedicated her composition, “The American Legion March,” to the Bullis Post. Post officers attended all district, state and sometimes national conventions and by February of 1930, our district’s posts were the very first in the state to achieve 100 percent sign up of memberships, 681 percent ahead of last year’s membership record. By the year 1932, the Bullis Post received a citation for having a total membership of 72.

Programs

We are sole sponsors of the community’s 4th of July celebrations; essay contests and play productions were staged down at the Bohemian Hall. For the youth of the community, a toboggan slide was provided at the local skating rink.

Throughout the 1930s two of our active post members- Art Bonzer and Hoyt (Shorty) Lynch – Were elected to offices in state government…Bonzer in the Senate and Lynch in the House.

The calendar shows 1938; it’s the first year that a Boys State session was held; we chose Gilbert Busta to be our first to go; while he was there many of the older boys of the community were heading for military training camp.

Since the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941, we seem to have more losses than victories lately as newscasts describe the battles from the fronts in Europe and out in the South Pacific; casualties run high. The grim realities of the conflicts come to the home front in the form of telegrams to the families of those fighting men over there. The messages arrived weekly about the missing and wounded in action, prisoner of war and the hardest to bear by the family to read and to accept were the killed in action.

Post membership in 1944 was 71 members and we fund small projects; new flags for main street, donations to the Boy Scouts, Salvation Army, Band Mothers and we continue to celebrate Armistice eve dances that were popular and well attended. With the war over in Europe, V-J Day arrives; we await new members to the post.

A matter of four years has passed and we have another national conflict, the Korean War; we welcome home the veterans who fought in that one; 106 members on our roster. Word is received of the recovery of the B-24 bomber of Lt. Paul Wittenberger in the Philippine jungles; he and his crew were in the wreckage that was reported lost since 1945.

The 1960s were busy years; picnic tables were donated to the city park; swimming pool, and a donation was sent to the John Davis for National Commander Campaign fund. Awarded seven life memberships to WW I veterans of the post. In 1967, Bullis Post was the only post in the state to win every department award. The American Legion Magazine is now a permanent part of the reading materials in the school and city libraries.

Veterans at VA Hospital at Fargo were visited and entertained by Legion and Auxiliary members.

1980s- 140 members, an all-time high, second longest record in the department; eight WW I vets in the post. John Popp was awarded a certificate from the post for his contribution to the community’s youth programs. The state Legion Band received our donation and we honored our two former POW’s. Average attendance at post meetings is 20; a new post home was purchased; 120 attended birthday dinner; 1987 Youth Citation Award; pancake feeds, home mortgage paid off.

1989- $2,000 College Scholarship Program, grants of $500 per year. Sports-concession complex built a city park for over $13,000. Smelt Frys held twice a year, well attended by the public. 148 members.

There is not enough space to tell our readers about the Bullis Post activities over the past 75 years, nor can we thank the Legionnaires who have departed from our ranks, but we can thank the living members of today for their unselfish dedication to the welfare of their community.

They have made their mark and have earned our due respect for accomplishing all of their numerous undertakings. Our only hope is that we honored these Legionnaires in the proper manner on the pages of the 75th Anniversary Post History book that went on sale in 1994.

Post 84 Wall of Pictures

Over 500 pictures of WW I, WW II, Korea and Vietnam veteran members line the north wall of the Bullis Post 84 American Legion home. Names of Legionnaires who started and added to the project are in bold lettering at the top along with others who gathered photos from friends and relatives to make this one-of-a-kind project a successful undertaking. Started in 1979 by Harris Honl and, later, with the help of Dave Ohm, Bob Dunn and others, it is still an ongoing project. Much credit goes to Ted Smykowski who enlarged or reduced all the pictures to a uniform size. Bill Wisnewski, Ted Harles, Myron Koeppe and Honl then contacted all Korean vets to list names in brass lettering on the south wall similar to names already there for WW II vets. Eldon Orth did the frames and posting.

Post 84 Constructs New Concession, Announcer Stand at Ball Park

In 1993, Bullis Post 84 constructed a concession stand, announcer stand Ipress box and restroom facilities at Lidgerwood’s Kugler Field. Proceeds from American Legion gaming were used to fund the construction. These improvements were an on-going effort by the Lidgerwood American Legion to improve the conditions at this ballpark. Free-hand painting of The American Legion emblem was furnished by local talent, Tammy Oster. The sign says it all, “Lidgerwood American Legion Baseball.”

Post Dedicates Army Tank in Celebrating Legion’s 75th Anniversary

Post 85 Beulah ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 85, Argonne Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Seventh District and located in Beulah, North Dakota.

Charter

Argonne Post 85 received its national organizational charter on November 5, 1919. The Post disbanded and its charter was cancelled on August 29, 2011.

Namesake

Possibly named after the Argonne Forest in France, the sight of heavy combat during WW I. 

Post 86 Minnewaukan ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 86, Gunnerud-Dietrich Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Third District and located in Minnewaukan, North Dakota.

Charter

The Gunnerud-Dietrich Post 86 received its national organizational charter on November 5, 1919.

Namesake

Menton Gunnerud was born in Brinsmade, North Dakota on January 15, 1885.  He was inducted into the United States Army at Devils Lake, North Dakota on May 25, 1918.  He served overseas in France from August 8, 1918 until he was killed in action on September 30, 1918.  He was buried in the American Cemetery in Meuse-Argonne France and returned to the United States on October 17, 1921 and then buried in Big Coulee Cemetery in Benson County, North Dakota. 

Fred W. Dietrich was born in Gilman, Illinois on February 4, 1896. He was inducted at Minnewaukan on April 11, 1918. He served overseas from May 3, 1918 and died September 29, 1918 of wounds received in Meuse-Argonne. He was buried in the American Cemetery, Meuse France.

Post 87 Wishek ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 87, Fred Kelle Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Fifth District and located in Wishek, North Dakota.

Charter

The Fred Kelle Post 87 received its national organizational charter on November 5, 1919.

Fred Kelle Post 87 of The American Legion was organized on November 18, 1919, at Wishek. The first commander of Fred Kelle Post 87 was E.P. Walker.

Namesake

Fred Kelle was born in Eureka, South Dakota on April 6, 1894.  He was inducted into the United States Army at Napoleon, North Dakota on May 24, 1918.  He served overseas in France from August 11, 1918 until he was killed in action on October 17, 1918.  He is buried in the American Cemetery at Meuse-Argonne France.

History

Post Membership

Persons who served in the armed forces of the United States during war time are eligible for membership. The original post consisted entirely of World War I veterans. Currently, there are members in the Wishek post who have served during World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War and the Persian Gulf War. Our post’s all time high membership was 125 in 1973. We enrolled 101 members in 1994.

Post Home

In the early years, the post held its meetings in the City Hall, the Odd Fellows Hall and a railroad car. In 1956, a Legion hall was built on Main Street. That building was sold in 1978, and a new Legion facility was erected at 23 N 2nd St. in 1979. The new 4,000 square-foot facility, which includes a meeting room, a full size kitchen, a refreshment area, restrooms and a storage area, is handicapped accessible. The space seats 160 people for functions. The Legion Auxiliary staffs the kitchen, to include furnishing all fixtures and kitchenware.

Post Auxiliary

Our Auxiliary unit has been a great booster of our post, both in good times and bad. It provides Christmas parties, Legion Birthday parties, and picnics and conducts fund raisers along with supporting Girls State and other activities in the community.

At present our Auxiliary officers are Vonnie Mehlhaff, president; Phyllis Gall, secretary, and Linda Mossett, treasurer.

Post Programs

The first American Legion baseball team sponsored by our post was in 1951. After a few years the program lapsed, but it was revived in 1963 and has been maintained continually since then. In recent years boys from Ashley, Lehr and Zeeland have also participated on our local team in addition to the players from Wishek.

The American Legion has provided substantial funds to help improve the baseball park in recent years. Contributions for improvements have gone towards green infields, a stadium with canopy and improving the dugouts in addition to supporting our Legion Baseball program.

Also receiving high priority on Post 87’s annual sponsorship list are the Memorial Day program and sending boys and girls to North Dakota Boys State and North Dakota Girls State.

Additionally, Post 87 supports many organizations, such as the Wishek Hospital, Ambulance squad, Retirement Home, 4-H, local school functions where needed, Dollars for Scholars fund and the Wishek and Lehr Fire Departments.

Over the years the post has furnished military funeral services for many veterans and has participated in patriotic events.

The 1993-94 officers serving our post’s 75th year were Harvey Schanzenbach, commander; James Bettenhausen, vice-commander; Richard Herr, adjutant; John Gall, finance officer; Donald Babitzke, historian; Rubin Rueb, service officer; Walter Mehlhaff, sergeant-at-arms; and Paul Rudolph, chaplain.

Post 88 Hankinson ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 88, Eberhard Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, Tenth District and located in Hankinson, North Dakota.

Charter

The Eberhard Post 88 received its national organizational charter on November 21, 1919.

Eberhard Post 88 was chartered November 21, 1919, with the needed minimum of 15 members. Elected the first post officers were: William Schram, commander; Dr. E. Williams, vice-commander; C.D. Denning, adjutant and finance officer; David Kulberg, historian; Richard A. Hein, chaplain, and O. Ponath, sergeant-at-arms.

In 1968, the annual Legion department convention was held in Bismarck, the site of the first convention 50 years earlier. On this occasion, Eberhard Post 88 Adjutant Leo Gray presented Rudy Hoefs and Edmund (Shave) Green with honorary life memberships in The American Legion. They were the last of the charter members of the State Legion Band, which was organized in 1924. Following the convention, Ray Green also was presented an honorary life membership in The American Legion. Hoefs and the two Greens were the last of the charter members of Eberhard Post 88.

Namesake

Initially chartered as Hankinson Post 88, the post was renamed April 11, 1922, in honor of Stanislaw Peter Eberhard, who was born June 14, 1896, at Brickentahl, Austria. A farmer in the Hankinson area, he became a naturalized U.S. citizen before he enlisted September 14, 1917, in the U.S. Army. His unit, Company I, First Infantry, North Dakota National Guard, at Wahpeton, was sent overseas three months later.  Joining the American forces in Europe, he was killed in action July 21, 1918, just seven months after bidding farewell to his adopted homeland. Eberhard earned the Silver Star as a result of his brief time at the warfront. He died near Soissons, France and his grave location is unknown.

History

Post Home

Hankinson’s American Legion building has been the community’s activity center since 1948. It’s comfortable, spacious facilities accommodate a wide range of meetings and social events that enrich the lives of local and area citizens. Early meeting places for the post were numerous. Among the locations for the post and Auxiliary unit in 1926 was Grawe’s Hall, which was leased for $350 a year. Then, in April 1927, the Masonic Lodge provided the meeting room one night each month for $37.50 per year, and this included janitor service.

In February 1929, post members authorized the commander to buy a railroad boxcar to become a meeting place. The price was not to exceed $50, including moving it onto a base of railroad ties. The project was completed that summer.

While some post members’ family members had “hit the rail” crossing the country in search of better lives in the Depression years, Post 88 took advantage of a different dream offer: It purchased a rail passenger coach owned by the Soo Line Railroad. The post bought the coach for $25.50 in 1939, and again used rail rolling stock as its meeting place on lots secured from the city. Financing blessings continued, because the boxcar-turned post home was sold a short time later for $50.55– no small gain in the economy of 1939.

In June 1940, the land at Lake Elsie known as the American Legion Park was obtained from the Richland County Commission. The deal had a proviso stipulating that the land was to be used only for a park with maintained public access to the lake.

It was time again to consider having larger quarters, and in May 1943 the members voted to buy the Jack MacDonald building for meetings and club activities. That purchase price was $1,500. The first meeting there was July 1. A month later, the former rail passenger coach was sold to Chris Krump of Fairmount on a high bid of $185. At the same post meeting, two outdoor toilets located at the Lake Elsie Legion park were sold to Fred Pankow — also on high bid — for $31.85.

With the return of World War II veterans, the first transition to post leadership by new ex-servicemen began at the March 3, 1946, post elections. Jerome Hipp was elected commander and Ross Green was elected adjutant.

A committee was appointed at the September 1947 meeting to select a site for a new post home and to develop cost estimates. Construction of the new Legion hall was started in the spring of 1948. A grand opening stage show and dance initiated the building in the fall. The cost of this welcomed addition to the Hankinson community was $42,000, with much of the labor donated by Legion members. The building became a community center; the public school and St. Francis Academy rented the hall for basketball games and stage functions until they each built their own gymnasiums. The bowling alley operation continued in the basement until June 1958, when George Jaeger, the then-owner, terminated his lease with the Legion. With the alleys gone, the basement was remodeled in 1960 to make it useable for meetings and open houses.

With the loss of renters for the basketball court and the four bowling lanes, the economic facts of life became increasingly burdensome on the post. Harold Jones, who had maintained the financial records on the building, reported to the January 1961 meeting that the post had spent $41,958 on construction and had subsidized the building fund with $15,298 more than income received since the building was opened.

But the Legion hall continued, even though, in March 1962, its basement was declared a civil defense fallout shelter, complete with stacks of civil defense materials and supplies. When that part of national preparedness passed, post members and others in the community decided to remodel the basement to accommodate bowling alleys again and pool tables in an effort to bring business back to Hankinson. The main floor hall had to wait into 1964 before post members decided remodeling was needed for better meeting space. When the job was done and a grand opening was held, this total cost was reported out at $1,497, with all labor donated.

Post Activity

Becoming more organized and functional, the post decided to order Springfield rifles from the government in 1932.

The cost of each rifle was $1.50. Service to the community was highly important to American Legion members in 1932. The post then authorized the purchase of text books for school children. This was a major contribution because, at that time in Hankinson, the custom was for parents of children in school to buy the needed books.

Memorial Day services in 1973 included the dedication of a veterans’ memorial. This monument was erected in honor of Archie Payne, killed in action November 27, 1943. The memorial was produced by Max Wipperman from a stone provided by the Payne family.

Eberhard Post 88 reached a new milestone in April 1973 with its first member being elected 10th District Commander-Leo Gray, who led the post to a new all-time high membership of 137.

During the summer of 1973, a new road was constructed across the Legion land at Lake Elsie and a large blacktop parking lot was completed.

The Paid-Up-For-Life (PUFL) membership program was launched in 1975. Leo Gray was the first PUFL member from North Dakota. He was recorded as 12 in national headquarters records. Joe German, Herman Pankow, Howard Braaten and Norman Pribbernow became PUFLers during the year.

Post 88 decided to upgrade its ceremonial rifles in 1976. An order was placed for M-1 rifles for the firing squad. It was renovation time again for the main hall — for another $20,000. A two-night Radio Days show complete with dinner and dancing was held in April 1981 under the direction of Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Hubrig. In April 1987, the post staged another dinner, dance and show event called “Yesteryears Once More.” A gift of $3,000 was given to the Community Clinic from the proceeds.

In January 1983, WW I members August Kuehl, John Vellenga, Frank Gereski and Fred Strache were named honorary life members in Post 88.

In the early 1990s, Post 88 acquired a part-time liquor license. Pull-tab machines were also procured and placed in local bars to generate income to support charitable programs.

Two more Eberhard Post 88 members served as 10th District commander –Glenn Hubrig (1990-91) and Ralph Bladow (1993-94). Locally, Leo Gray was serving in his 35th year as Post 88 adjutant when he passed away in the spring of 1989.

With the advent of gaming, many local charitable causes have received assistance from Eberhard Post 88. Among them are Boys Scouts, Girl Scouts, oratorical contests, Legion State Band, local high school programs such as Dollars for Scholars and other scholarships. In addition, gaming money has been distributed to the local health clinic, fire department, ambulance service and other worthy causes.

The post has aided national efforts, among them these in Washington, DC: Korean Memorial, Vietnam Memorial and Women’s Vietnam Memorial.

Legion baseball teams are sponsored by the post as are two boys each year to Boys State. Since World War II, the post has provided American Legion awards to students in the Hankinson schools.

Post members continue to hold Memorial Day and Veterans Day programs each year as well as commemorating the Legion’s birthday in mid-March.

The American Legion’s 50th anniversary celebration was held in the Hankinson Public School on Veterans Day 1969. Past Department Commander Pat Milloy was the speaker for the occasion and a public dance was held.

These officers served Post 88 during its 75th anniversary year: Tim Kuehl, commander; Glenn Hubrig, vice-commander; Joe German, finance officer, which position he has held for 35 years; Ralph Bladow, adjutant; Roland Steinwehr, historian; Neal Nelson, chaplain; Cornie Intveld, sergeant-at-arms, and Elmer Bladow, service officer.

By then, the post’s color guard and firing squad had several opportunities to perform in their uniforms, which had been new for Hankinson’s 75th anniversary observance in 1961.

Post Auxiliary

The Auxiliary of The American Legion at Hankinson was chartered in October 1922. The following names appear on the charter: The wives of C.H. Hart, H.J. Schuster, H.A. Aim, Frank LaQua, T.W. Robey, Fred Worner, Carl Krause, F.O. Hunger, Paul Crawford, George Schuett, J. McDonald, James Tullock and Misses Rose DeFea and E.M. Foss.

In May 1922, Poppy Day was observed for the first time. Poppy poster contests were held in the school and poppies were sold. Poppy sales still are used to support veterans’ rehabilitation.

The Auxiliary has participated in many activities. We have sent money for gifts at the North Dakota Veterans Home in Lisbon. When the Veterans Hospital at Fargo was completed in 1929, we sent rest pillows, tray covers and many pounds of silk stockings for patients to make rugs.

Hankinson’s Legion ceremonial team participates at Lidgerwood’s 75th anniversary celebration Aug. 31, 1961.

We send girls to Girls State and place flags and poppies on veterans’ graves on Memorial Day.

A major project was remembering the Gold Star Mothers on their birthdays and on Mothers’ Day.

Donations are sent to the Red Cross, Special Olympics, Cancer Fund, Heart Fund, Mental Health Service, Hankinson Clinic Fund and other special needs in the community.

On March 29, 1969, the unit hosted a party to celebrate the Legion’s 50th birthday. Fourteen World War I, 27 World War II and six Korean Conflict Legionnaires and their wives attended. Total was 107. Through the dedicated efforts of these ladies, the Eberhard Unit has been a beneficial force in Hankinson. May it continue to preserve America, its ideals, its privileges and its ways of life!

Post Officers

Post YearPost CommanderPost Adjutant
1919-20William SchrammC.R. Dennig
1920-21Charles Hein, Jr.L.O. Kretchman
1921-22Edmund W. GreenL.O. Kretchman
1922-23Alfred A. HeinCarl W. Krause
1923-24H.J. SchusterH.R. Murphy
1924-25Joe LeeSam Dering
1925-26L.O. KretchmanEdmund W. Green
1926-27Maurice S. AkerH.J. Schuster
1927-28Walter StackE.L. Allen
1928-29Rudolph H. HoefsP.A. Jensen
1929-30Harold M. JonesP.A. Jensen
1930-31P.A. JensenC.H. Siefken
1931-32R.F. SchellerCharles O. Weston
1932-33Frank J. LaquaHarry S. Worner
1933-34Harry S. WornerH.S. Cox
1934-35Bruno MillerM.A. Johnson
1935-36Martin A. JohnsonFred R. Radloff
1936-37W.H. PikalL.O. Peterson
1937-38H.S. CoxL.O. Peterson
1938-39Charles O. WestonCharles P. Korth
1939-40Charles P. KorthGilbert H. Meyer
1940-41Gilbert H. MeyerTheodore Brinbaum
1941-42Rudolph H. HoefsEdmund W. Green
1942-43H.M. JonesEdmund W. Green
1943-44M.S. AkerEdmund W. Green
1944-45William A. ShermanEdmund W. Green
1945-47Jerome HippRoss M. Green
1947-48Everett R. BudgeRoss M. Green
1948-49John V. HippEarl Dosch
1949-50Edward J. SchellerWilliam A. Sherman
1950-53Edward J. SchellerEdmund W. Green
1953-55Everett R. BudgeChester W. Setterlund
1955-56Everett R. BudgeLeo W. Gray
1956-57Joseph GermanLeo W. Gray
1957-58Neal NelsonLeo W. Gray
1958-59August RothLeo W. Gray
1959-60Chester SetterlundLeo W. Gray
1960-62Roland SteinwehrLeo W. Gray
1962-66Howard BraatenLeo W. Gray
1966-67Peter KollingLeo W. Gray
1967-68Frank HermesLeo W. Gray
1968-69James FalkLeo W. Gray
1969-70Roland SteinwehrLeo W. Gray
1970-71Charles “Pat” MahrerLeo W. Gray
1971-74Ralph BladowLeo W. Gray
1974-77Herman PankowLeo W. Gray
1977-80James BraatenLeo W. Gray
1980-82Elroy KrumpLeo W. Gray
1982-84Bruce BommersbachLeo W. Gray
1984-86Harlan BladowLeo W. Gray
1986-88Elmer BladowLeo W. Gray
1988-89Charles KrauseLeo W. Gray
1989-93Charles KrauseRalph Bladow
1993-94Tim KuehlRalph Bladow

Post 89 Heaton ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 89, Heaton-Sykeston Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Fourth District and located in Heaton, North Dakota.

Charter

Originally the Heaton Post 89, the Post received its national organizational charter on November 21, 1919. That same year, the Bourke-Hollingsworth Post 17 from Sykeston, received its national organizational charter on August 6, 1919. Post 17 however, disbanded and its charter was cancelled on June 15, 1925. With this cancellation, in 1936 Post 89 added “Sykeston” to their name to become the Heaton-Sykeston Post 89. Post 17 reorganized and received its second national organizational charter on August 6, 1947. In 1951, due to the loss of key Post officers, Post 89 reorganized. Following this reorganization, in order to reduce confusion between the Sykeston and the Heaton-Sykeston Posts; Post 89 sought to drop the “Sykeston” portion of their name and reverted back as the Heaton Post 89. However, formal action to change the name was not acted upon; therefore it remained the Heaton-Sykeston Post.

The 1963-1964 Officers Report, sent to Department Headquarters, contains the following:

“All officers remain the same as last year. As of this date the Heaton Post plans are to discontinue the Post at the June meeting. We can’t accumulate enough funds to operate Post and be active in Legion and community activities. We will transfer our members to other Posts in the area.”

The Post disbanded, its members transferred to local area Posts, and its charter was cancelled on September 23, 1963.

Namesake

Named after the town it is located at.

History

Programs—Legislative

In the February 2nd, 1920 report Commander H. D. Harding reported the Post had, under the Resolutions, if any passed heading: “Asking representative in state legislature to explain his stand on measures endorsed by the Legion at recent session of the state legislature; particularly “The Red Flag Bill” and “The American Citizen Bill.”

In July 9th, 1920 report Commander H. D. Harding reported the Post had, under the What publicity has your Post had during the month? heading: “Correspondence we had with representative in regard to “Red Flag” bill appeared on front page of leading Anti-Townley paper in the county.”

Awards

In 1925, Post 89 was the recipient of a citation in recognition of its meritorious service the post accomplished with its membership during the past year.

In 1933, Post 89 was the recipient of a citation in recognition of its excellent membership work the post accomplished during the past year.

In 1935, Post 89 was the recipient of a citation in recognition of its outstanding membership achievement the post accomplished during the past year.

In 1936, Post 89 was the recipient of the Special Certificate of the Most Distinguished Service by National Headquarters for remarkable membership activity.

In 1937, Post 89 was the recipient of the Special Certificate of the Most Distinguished Service by National Headquarters for remarkable membership activity.

In 1939, Post 89 was the recipient a Special Citation for Distinguished Service, issued by National Headquarters, in recognition of the outstanding membership work the Post accomplished for the new year.

In 1942, Post 89 was the recipient of the 1942 gold date seal to be attached to their Meritorious Service Citation. The Meritorious Service Citation is awarded to each Post that renews, by December 31, a total membership equaling or exceeding its average membership of the past four years.

In 1947, Post 89 was the recipient of a seal to be attached to their Distinguished Service Citation having been awarded the in some year pervious to 1946.

In 1949, Post 89 was the recipient of the Honor Ribbon ’49 for enrolling a 1949 membership by December 31st, exceeding its total 1948 membership.

In 1950, Post 89 was the recipient of the Honor Ribbon ’50 for enrolling a 1950 membership by December 31st, exceeding its total 1949 membership.

In 1952, Post 89 was the recipient of the Honor Ribbon ’52 for enrolling a 1952 membership by December 31st, exceeding its total 1951 membership and the Special Certificate of the Most Distinguished Service.

In 1957, Post 89 was the recipient of the Special Certificate of the Most Distinguished Service for enrolling a 1957 membership exceeding its total 1956 enrollment and of the ’57 Honor Ribbon for equaling or surpassing its total 1956 membership by December 31, 1962.

In 1958, Post 89 was the recipient of the Special Certificate of the Most Distinguished Service for enrolling a 1958 membership by November 11, 1957 exceeding its total 1957 enrollment.

In 1959, Post 89 was the recipient of the Honor Ribbon ’59 for enrolling a 1959 membership by December 31st, exceeding its total 1958 membership.

In 1963, Post 89 was the recipient of the 1963 Honor Ribbon for equaling or surpassing its total 1962 membership by December 31, 1962; and the 1963 American Legion Birthday Award for equaling or surpassing its 1962 enrollment by march 15-17, 1963 and holding appropriate Legion Birthday observances.

Membership

In June 2nd, 1920 report Commander H. D. Harding reported the Post had, under the Criticism encounterd in getting members? heading: “No, We have a 100% membership here in town, but there is one man in the county we cannot get, for his wife objects to his joining. We are keeping after both of them however.”

Post Auxiliary

Post Officers/Membership

Post YearCommanderAdjutantMembership
1919  26
1919-20H. D. HardingHoward I. Turner26
1920-21H. D. HardingHoward I. Turner19
1921-22H. I. ImmelHoward I. Turner18
1922-23H. I. ImmelHoward I. Turner16
1923-24Art NeilsenHoward I. Turner14
1924-25Calvin E. PrangHoward I. Turner16
1925-26V. J. BronkHoward I. Turner20
1926-27V. J. BronkHoward I. Turner18
1927-28George E. GuentherHoward I. Turner24
1928-29A. W. WedmanHoward I. Turner22
1929-30Forrest DanielAlvin. E. Soderholm17
1930-31Howard I. TurnerAlvin. E. Soderholm26
1931-32A. E. SoderholmGeorge H. Olson15
1932-33E. W. FlaugherHoward I. Turner26
1933-34E. W. FlaugherAlvin. E. Soderholm33
1934-35E. W. FlaugherAlvin. E. Soderholm40
1935-36E. W. FlaugherC. M. Corson36
1936-37E. W. FlaugherForrest Daniel45
1937-38E. W. FlaugherForrest Daniel40
1938-39E. W. FlaugherMartin G. Skow43
1939-40E. W. FlaugherMartin G. Skow44
1940-41E. W. FlaugherMartin G. Skow48
1941-42E. W. FlaugherMartin G. Skow46
1942-43E. W. FlaugherMartin G. Skow44
1943-44E. W. FlaugherMartin G. Skow46
1944-45Forrest DanielMartin G. Skow42
1945-46E. L. EatonMartin G. Skow81
1946-47Arthur A. NeumillerForrest Daniel65
1947-48Dallas H. EdingerMartin G. Skow29
1948-49John GrantMartin G. Skow32
1949-50Clarence KahlMartin G. Skow37
1950-51Gordon W. KahlAlbert Mack41
1951-52Gordon W. KahlAlbert Mack43
1952-53Clarence KahlC. L. Budish39
1953-54Clarence KahlPaul Bjerke Jr.29
1954-55Clarence KahlPaul Bjerke Jr.21
1955-56Clarence KahlPaul Bjerke Jr.22
1956-57Clarence KahlLloyd Miller28
1957-58Paul Bjerke Jr. A. E. Johnson31
1958-59Rudolph NeumillerMelvin Rask34
1959-60Rudolph NeumillerMelvin Rask25
1960-61Melvin A. RaskA. E. Johnson27
1961-62Arthur A. NeumillerA. E. Johnson22
1962-63A. E. JohnsonMelvin Rask24
1963-64Post Disbanded  

Post 90 Center ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 90, Miller-Linn Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Seventh District and located in Center, North Dakota.

Charter

The Miller-Linn Post, initially the Edward A. Miller Post 90, received it national organizational charter on November 21, 1919. The Post disbanded and its charter was cancelled on May 6, 1932. The Post reorganized as the Miller-Linn Post 90. It received its second charter on January 23, 1946.

Namesake

Edward Alfred Miller was born at Sanger, North Dakota on November 27, 1891.  He was inducted into the United States Army at Center, North Dakota on February 25, 1918.  He served overseas from May 2, 1918 until his death on September 15, 1918.  His remains were returned to the United States on October 31, 1921 and he was buried in Arlington National Cemetery (European Section).  Samuel F. Linn was born at Fort Clark, North Dakota on August 6, 1918.  He entered the United States Army on March 26, 1942 at Fort Snelling, Minnesota.  He served in the European, African and Middle East theatre of operations.  He was killed in action at Normandy France on June 12, 1944.  He is buried at the Black Hills National Cemetery at Rapid City, South Dakota.

Post 91 New Salem ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 91, John Repsdorf Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Seventh District and located in the New Salem, North Dakota.

Charter

The John Repsdorf Post 91 received its national organizational charter on November 21, 1919.

On Oct. 28, 1919, the veterans of the Great War from New Salem held an organizational meeting at the Rex Theater for the purpose of organizing an American Legion Post in New Salem, to designate a name for the post and to name a representative to accept a charter if issued. Upon motion, Philip Blank was appointed acting chairman and John Wicker as secretary until a regular meeting could be held for the election of officers.

The first regular meeting was held November 11, 1919, with 37 charter members. It was moved and seconded that the name of the post would be the John Repsdorf Post 91 in honor of John Repsdorf, who was the first soldier from New Salem to lose his life in France in World War I.

Namesake

John Repsdorf was born at New Salem, North Dakota on January 22, 1889.  He enlisted in the North Dakota National Guard at Bismarck on July 23, 1917.  He served overseas in France from December 15, 1917 until he was killed in action on July 22, 1918.  He is buried at the American Cemetery, Seringes-et-Nesles, Aisne, France.

History

Post Programs

The post sponsored its first basketball game in January 1922; all the players agreed to furnish their own uniforms. In 1926, a new piano was purchased for the new city auditorium, and it was agreed that all organizations could use the piano free of charge.

In January 1927, the post started holding its meetings in the city, auditorium. It was decided to meet on the 2nd Thursday of each month and this date is still used.

The first Legion baseball team was organized in March of 1929. Ervin Kruger was appointed to go to the local school to create interest for players. Ed Stein was named team supervisor, which also included the preparation of the playing field.

The Legion and Auxiliary were instrumental in helping build the New Salem Swimming Pool. They conducted auction and rummage sales and had special basketball games to raise funds for the pool.

In the mid-1970s, the post tried to build its own post home and bowling lanes but, due to lack of funds, the project did not materialize.

In 1976, Viola Moltzen was elected national vice-president of The American Legion Auxiliary and, in 1977, became national president of the Auxiliary – an outstanding honor for John Repsdorf Post 91 and its affiliated Auxiliary unit of New Salem. She has also several on many national committees for The American Legion Auxiliary.

During the years 1980-1983, the post placed flag poles in cemeteries wherever fellow comrades have been buried.

Winnifred Smith, a New Salem High School student, won the state Oratorical Contest in 1987, receiving a $1,000 scholarship. She also repeated as the 1988 state Legion Oratorical Contest champion and scholarship winner. She is the daughter of Fred and Linda Smith, residents of New Salem.

In 1989 and 1990, the post and the city of New Salem mounted a plaque on a native stone found south of New Salem. The monument, which was dedicated on Memorial Day 1990, honors all men and women who served in thte armed forces. The monument is located next to the city auditorium, where the national and North Dakota flags are flown 24-hours a day.

In 1993, the post purchased an electronic pull tab machine to help raise money for the many programs of the Legion and community. These programs included Boys and Girls State, International Music Camp, Veterans Hospital, Veterans Home, North Dakota State Hospital and the North Dakota Veterans’ Cemetery. Also benefiting from gaming are local organizations, school projects and people in need.

The annual programs of the Legion include Memorial Day, when the program is held at the city auditorium. White crosses are placed on the lawn for all deceased veterans. Flags are also placed in the cemeteries. The Honor Guard and Firing Squad perform at the auditorium to conclude the service. The Legion and Auxiliary serve lunch to all attending the service.

On Veterans Day, a program is held at Elm Crest Manor to honor the veterans and families of veterans. The public is invited and a lunch is served.

We have an active Honor Guard and Firing Squad which participate on Memorial Day, military funerals and other special occasions. During the life of the post, we had an all-time high of 119 members, recorded in 1983.

Post 91 has had seven Legionnaires who served as commander of the 7th District. They are Ed Tempel, 1935-36; Vern A. Stayton, 1959-60; Frank Freezon, 1962-63; Alvin Moltzen, 1968-69; Edgar Beneke, 1972-73; Dick W. Henke, 1987- 88, and Ken Hoger, 1989-90. During his term, Hoger won the Arnold J. Stockstad Award and led units and marchers from the district in the department convention parade.

Post 91 Legionnaires are proud of their heritage and privilege of being an active post in New Salem’s community.

Post Commanders and Adjutants

Post YearPost CommanderPost Adjutant
1919-20Philip W. BlankJohn H. Wecker
1920-21Herman LeonhardEdward H. Kruger
1921-23John H. WeckerEdward H. Kruger
1923-24Frank GotschallEdward H. Kruger
1924-26Max BuckmanEdward H. Kruger
1926-27W.D. ToepkeO.W. Fode
1927-28George F. BlankO.W. Fode
1928-29Frederick MannW.D. Toepke
1929-30George D. ClaudEd Tempel
1930-31Edward H. KrugerGeorge F. Blank
1931-32L.A. AlbrechtW.D. Toepke
1932-33Ed TempelW.D. Toepke
1933-35Edward H. KrugerGeorge F. Blank
1935-36Tony StarkKenneth O. Yates
1936-37W.D. ToepkeOscar J. Klusmann
1937-38Ed TempelOscar J. Klusmann
1938-40W.L. DickeyOscar J. Klusmann
1940-41Kenneth O. YatesGeorge F. Blank
1941-42O.J. KlusmannGeorge F. Blank
1942-43J.H. OlsonW.D. Toepke
1943-44H.V. JebbW.D. Toepke
1944-45Emil GieseW.D. Toepke
1945-46Forrest L. SchmidtGeorge F. Blank
1946-47Alvin StaytonOscar J. Klusmann
1947-48LeRoy HeinAlvin Moltzen
1948-49Lester JensenAlvin Stayton
1949-50E.C. ChristiansenGuy Hall
1950-51Roy JustDetlev Bensen
1951-52Vern A. StaytonLeRoy Hein
1952-53Cale DickeyJoseph J. Ferderer
1953-54Archie BehkeE. C. Christiansen
1954-55T.G. FreemanWillard Rusch
1955-56Howard KitchenEdmund Bauer
1956-57Joseph J. FerdererVern A. Stayton
1957-58Ray SchneiderVern A. Stayton
1958-59Tony EngelhardtCale Dickey
1959-60Frank C. FreezonLloyd Just
1960-61Edgar BenekeLloyd Just
1961-62Roger GrubeLloyd Just
1962-63Joseph J. FerdererLloyd Just
1963-64Alvin MoltzenLloyd Just
1964-66LeRoy SchwartingLloyd Just
1966-67Willard RuschLloyd Just
1967-68Melvin MorgensternLloyd Just
1968-70Lester SchwaglerLloyd Just
1970-72Ervin HolleLloyd Just
1972-74Wallace SchulteLloyd Just
1974-75Dick W. HenkeLloyd Just
1975-76Alvin BumannLloyd Just
1976-77Gene McCowanLloyd Just
1977-79Dick W. HenkeLloyd Just
1979-81Darrel KuhnLloyd Just
1981-84Kenneth HogerLloyd Just
1984-85Lester SchwaglerLloyd Just
1985-87Dick W. HenkeLloyd Just
1987-89Kenneth HogerLloyd Just
1989-91William KeutherLloyd Just
1991-94Owen SchultzLloyd Just

Post 92 Northwood ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 92, Victory Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, Second District and located in Northwood, North Dakota.

Charter

The Victory Post 92 received its national organizational charter on November 21, 1919.

Namesake

Most likely derived its name from the victory of World War I. The Victory Post 92 received its national organizational charter on November 21, 1919.

Post 93 Portland ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 93, Anderson-Hefta Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, First District and located in Portland, North Dakota.

Charter

The Anderson-Hefta Post 93, initially the Charles M. Root Post 93, received its national organizational charter on November 21, 1919. The Post disbanded and its charter was cancelled on June 15, 1925. The Post reorganized as the Clarence O. Anderson Post 93. It received its second national organization charter on August 19, 1944. At a September 7, 1982 meeting the Post members passed an unanimous motion to change the Post’s name to Anderson-Hefta Post 93.

Namesake

The Anderson-Hefta Post 93, initially the Charles M. Root Post 93, received its national organizational charter on November 21, 1919.  Charles Martin Root was born at Mendon, Michigan on December 11, 1891.  He was inducted into the United States Army at Hillsboro, North Dakota on June 24, 1918.  He died on October 24, 1918.   The Post disbanded and its charter was cancelled on June 15, 1925. The Post reorganized as the Clarence O. Anderson Post 93.  Clarence O. Anderson was born in Portland, North Dakota on January 9, 1924.  He was inducted into the United States Army at Fort Snelling, Minnesota on January 19, 1943.  He served in the European, African and Middle East theatres.  He died in service on November 15, 1943 and is buried at Cambridge England.  Kenneth Hefta was born in Portland, North Dakota on August 6, 1928.  He entered the United States Army at Fort Lewis, Washington on October 1, 1950.  He was killed in action on April 10, 1951.  His remains were not recovered.

Post 94 Alexander ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 94, Forrest E. Williams Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Ninth District and located in Alexander, North Dakota.

Charter

The Forrest E. Williams Post 94 received its national organizational charter on November 21, 1919.

Namesake

Forrest Eugene Williams was born in Missouri on January 21, 1895.  He was inducted at Schafer on September 3, 1918.  He died on October 2, 1918 at Camp Grant, Illinois.

Post 95 Kintire ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 95, Bryon West Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Fifth District and located in Kintire, North Dakota.

Charter

The Bryon West Post 95 received its national organizational charter on November 21, 1919. Due to non-payment of membership dues to maintain a minimum Post membership of 15, the Post disbanded and its charter was revoked in 1928. Interest in reorganizing the Post surfaced when Mrs. Leonard Dickson, Secretary, Byron West Post 95 Auxiliary sent a July 29, 1949 letter to Department Headquarters to request how to re-establish the Post. In her letter she stated that since the end of the second war, she has contacted 20 veterans who are interested in re-establishing the Post. She continues that there are more veterans in the community; however, she had not had the opportunity to contact them.

Namesake

Bryon H. West was born in Spencer, South Dakota on February 1898.  He enlisted at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri on July 27, 1918.  He served overseas from September 25, 1918 until his death on October 17, 1918.  He is buried at Arlington National Cemetery. 

History

Awards

In 1927, Post 95 was the recipient of a Honor Post Citation in recognition of the Post’s activity in the community and attaining the membership quote assigned to them by Department Headquarters.

Post Officers/Membership

Post YearCommanderAdjutantMembership
1919  15
1919-20Roscoe WurmJohn F. Tonander15
1920-21V. B. JensenA. O. Lindahl17
1921-22No RecordPeder P. Dahl 
1922-23Roscoe WurmGeorge E. Weber 
1923-24S. R. DayCalvin Alberts 
1924-25R. P. SiscoCalvin Alberts 
1925-26John R. TonanderS. R. Day 
1926-27R. P. SiscoA. O. Lindahl 
1927-28A. O. LindahlHarry H. Beal 
1928-29Post Disbanded  

Post 96 Powers Lake ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 96, Roy Clementsen Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Ninth District and located in Powers Lake, North Dakota.

Charter

The Roy Clementsen Post 96 received its national organization charter on November 24, 1919. The Post disbanded and its charter was cancelled on June 15, 1925. The Post reorganized and the Post received its second national organizational charter on January 3, 1947.

Namesake

Roy Martinus Clementsen was born at Cushing, Wisconsin on September 26, 1895.  He was inducted into the United States Army on April 29, 1918 at Bowbells, North Dakota.  He served overseas from June 20, 1918 until he was killed in action on September 17, 1918.  His remains were returned to the United States on May 13, 1922 and he is buried in Grandview Cemetery, Burbank, California.

Post 97 Larimore ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 97, Ted Valerius Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, Second District and located in Larimore, North Dakota.

Charter

The Ted Valerius Post 97 received its national organizational charter on November 24, 1919.

On Armistice Day 1919, 15 ex-servicemen were assembled and signed an application for post of The American Legion.

National headquarters issued a charter for this new post on November 24, 1919, but it was not until January 28, 1920, that a permanent organization was formed. The post is among the very few in the state named after an area serviceman not killed in battle-front action or dying from injuries received while in wartime action.

Namesake

Theodore Joseph Valerius was 24 years old when he joined the Army on April 10, 1917, just five days after the United States declared war on Germany. He trained at Fort Leavenworth, KS, and was assigned to C Company, 5th Field Batallin of the Signal Corps. He was promoted from private to sergeant on December 1, 1917, but was stricken with pneumonia at Fort Leavenworth and died of complications on January 4, 1918. His willingness to serve so soon after hostilities began was the reason that American Legion Post 97 at Larimore was named after Ted Valerius.

History

Programs

On April 1, 1920, the post gave its first annual ball and cleared a very nice sum for the treasury. Department Commander C. L. Dawson attended our regular meeting on March 31, 1920, gave an enjoyable address and helped us get started in organizing a Women’s Auxiliary here. Our post had charge of the Fourth of July celebration in the city of Larimore this year and our Buddies showed plenty of “pep.” Mrs. W. C. Peterson served as our Auxiliary’s first (1920-21) unit president.

Post Home

Although our post was hopeful of opening clubrooms for members and their friends in 1920, this did not happen until many years later. On September 16, 1947, Post 97 purchased a two-story brick building owned by A.O.U.W. Lodge 82.

Clubroom facilities were installed, now known as the Vets Club. At one time the first floor of this building was used by the Elk Valley Bottling Works, and the second floor for meetings and dances. In July 1958 the post purchased property adjacent to the existing building and constructed a concrete block building that housed a hall and a restaurant on the main floor and bowling lanes on the lower level.

Post 97 is the only post in North Dakota operating bowling recreation facilities for the community, and its establishment has hosted some state Legion bowling tournaments.

Membership

We celebrated our national bicentennial by enrolling an all-time high of 286 members in Post 97. Since 1960 our post has had 29 years of enrollments in excess of 200 and, in recent years, has been hovering around our 1994 membership of 203.

Fifty-four Legionnaires have served as Commander and 30 as Adjutant of Post 97. They are listed below.

Post Commanders and Adjutants

Post YearPost CommanderPost Adjutant
1920-21Guy WalsterPaul E. Glass
1921-22Edwin MarienPaul E. Glass
1922-23Paul E. GlassOscar W.H. Bode
1923-24Paul E. GlassL.E. Woods
1924-25Oscar G. HansonM. N. Thompson
1925-27Oscar W.H. BodeJ.M. Hofte
1927-28Harry H. PiferAnthony Gass
1928-30Oscar W.H. BodeOscar W. H. Bode
1930-31Oscar W.H. BodeElmer Woods
1931-34Oscar G. HansonElmer Woods
1934-35Oscar G. HansonPaul E. Glass
1935-36Joseph P. MarkovickPaul E. Glass
1936-37John W. ShidePaul E. Glass
1937-38Earl BradshawBen Gesatis
1938-39James MurphyJ.F. Sheehan
1939-40Charles WilliamsRoger Snyder
1940-41Sievert HaugenGeorge Solseng
1941-42John W. ShideHarold Gargrave
1942-43Hugh AndersonFrank A. Day
1943-44Earl KeglerMartin Camrud
1944-45Oscar W. H. BodeBen Franson
1945-46John E. KohlerGeorge Bang (Part)
  V. J. Melarvie
1946-47Lloyd JarmanWilliam Ruelle
1947-48Robert EricksonCharles J. McErlane (Part)
  Vernon Mork
1948-49Selmer JohnsonLloyd Craft
1949-50John W. ShideMaurice Matheson
1950-51Alfred LindbergMaurice Matheson
1951-52Donald RockMaurice Matheson
1952-53Mark HandyMaurice Matheson
1953-54Ralph S. OliverMaurice Matheson
1954-55Robert ShideQuintin Nygaard
1955-56Henry ShideQuintin Nygaard
1956-57Alfred GrattonMaurice Matheson
1957-58Floyd LempeMaurice Matheson
1958-59James BangMaurice Matheson
1959-60Donald TingumMaurice Matheson
1960-61William GriffinMaurice Matheson
1961-62Lawrence P. BillDonald Jarman
1962-63Russel SweeneyBob Rudow (Part)
  Lawrence Bill
1963-64Vernon BentleyLawrence Bill
1964-65Clifford G. KylloLawrence Bill
1965-66George JohnsonJames Andrys
1966-67Vernon ThorenJames Andrys
1967-68James AndrysBennie Nowek
1968-69Harold GrattonBennie Nowek
1969-70Elmer BornsenBennie Nowek
1970-71Maurice K. MathesonBennie Nowek
1971-73Lawrence WeberBennie Nowek
1973-74William J. MartinBennie Nowek
1974-75Thomas SolsengBennie Nowek
1975-76Cameron BouldenBennie Nowek
1976-77Dennis PazdericBennie Nowek
1977-78William J. MartinBennie Nowek
1978-80Ronald RochBennie Nowek
1980-82Charles SweeneyBennie Nowek
1982-84Terry GrattonBennie Nowek
1984-86J. Arnold PietronAlbert Tuma
1986-88Donald GrattonAlbert Tuma
1988-90Perry NesdahlAlbert Tuma
1990-92Paul HebertAlbert Tuma
1992-94Claire MorsethAlbert Tuma
1994-94Ted CiakAlbert Tuma

Post 98 Langdon ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 98, Langdon Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Third District and located in Langdon, North Dakota.

Charter

The Langdon Post 98 received its national organizational charter on November 24, 1919.

Langdon Post 98 had its beginning November 24, 1919, when a temporary charter with 47 members was issued. On December 18, 1920, a permanent charter was granted to the post. The Langdon post incorporated during the 1972-73 year and is now known as Langdon Post 98, Incorporated.

Namesake

Named for the town it is located in.

History

Post Home

Legion meetings were held once a month upstairs over the old Fire Hall building located near the present-day Fire Hall and auditor’s office. During the year 1957, a school house was purchased from the Lorna, ND area and moved to its present location on Second Street in Langdon. The building was placed on a new block basement previously built. Remodeling projects over the years neatly improved the inside of the school building into a nice Legion meeting place. Bingo and dances were held here for several years when, in 1972, work was begun on an addition to the present building. The labor force of volunteers came from the post, except for the excavation and heating work.

The new building was first used on December 29, 1972, for the New Year’s party. Formal dedication was held March 16, 1973. Several state Legion officials were present for the ceremonies.

Several years ago, the interior of our American Legion home received a face lift which included remodeling of the bar, ceiling tile replacement and remodeling the interior of the old school building with new trim and painting. Again, most of the work was done by volunteers of Post 98.

Membership

Post 98’s membership has at times been over 300, including its all-time high year of 315 members in 1987, but enrollment in the past few years has been running between 270 and 290 members. Forty-three are paid-up-for-life memberships.

Programs

Post 98 participates in numerous parades, Veterans and Memorial Day programs, funerals when asked for memorial rites, Parades of Lights and special ceremonies in the community.

Donations (some on an annual basis) are many: Langdon 4-H, Christmas Baskets for Cavalier County Social Services, Day Care centers, the Salvation Army, Sports Booster clubs, Cub Scouts, the U.S. Durum Pageant, St. Alphonsus School, International Music Camp, Legion Scholarship funds, the American Cancer Society, local graduation parties, Toys for Kids, American Legion baseball, child welfare programs, Boys State, oratorical contests, town ce1ntennials, coloring books for kids, PTA, National Young Leaders conference plus others.

On March 15, 1994, the post received a Diamond Jubilee Certificate of Recognition for 75 years of continuous service, operating as a post of our country’s greatest veterans’ organization.

Today, Langdon Legionnaires can be proud of their accomplishments over the years and can, with pride, look forward to Post 98 serving the community well in the future.

Post Officers

The post has had a total of 65 commanders to date. Marion Ullyott became the first female commander of Post 98 and served for two years, 1952-53 and 1953-54. At the time, she was possibly the only woman commander of an American Legion post in North Dakota and also quite possibly in the nation.

Post 99 Ryder ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 99, L.C. Jensen Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Sixth District and located in Ryder, North Dakota.

Charter

The L. C. Jensen Post 99 received its national organizational charter on November 24, 1919.

Namesake

Louis Christian Jensen was born in Copenhagen, Denmark on April 24, 1877.  He enlisted at Minot, North Dakota on July 21, 1918.  He served overseas in France from September 29, 1918 until his death on October 12, 1918.  He was buried at the American Cemetery, Seringes-et-Nesles, Aisne France.

Post 100 Hebron ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 100, Henry Biffart Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Seventh District and located in Hebron, North Dakota.

Charter

The Henry Biffart Post 100 received its national organizational charter on November 24, 1919. The Post disbanded and its charter cancelled on June 15, 1925. The Post reorganized and the Post received its second national organizational charter on December 26, 1930.

One year to the day after World War I ended, 15 former servicemen from the Hebron, ND, area petitioned The American Legion to charter a post to be named after Henry Biffart, the first Hebron area soldier to lose his life in the war in France.

Chartered November 30, 1919, the post’s first officers were C.L. Robertson, commander; Ben Lutz, adjutant, and A.E. Funk, finance officer. Other charter members were Carl Roesenet, B.R. Cooley, W.F. Reuter, Henry Backfisch, D.A. Ryner, Steve Kaufman, Claude Stelter, F.S. Tollefson, Peter Singer, Theophil Frey, Sam Schierbaum and George Meyer. The Post disbanded and its charter was cancelled on June 15, 1925.

Namesake

Henry Biffart was born in Wargaski, Russia on November 10, 1896.  He was inducted at Mandan, North Dakota on May 24, 1918.  He served overseas in France from July 31, 1918 until he was killed in action on November 11, 1918.  He was buried at the American Cemetery Thiaucourt, Meurthe-et-Moselle, France.

History

Service Beyond the Post

Several Post 100 members have distinguished themselves beyond activities and service in the post: T.H. Mark was district commander 1936-47; Armin Rehm served in that position 1948-49 and Gus Draeb was the district Commander 1958-59. Edmund Remfort was 1963-67 department Boy Scouts director. Additionally, Draeb served as western: region department vice-commander 1960-61, as department commander 1963-64, as department judge advocate 1964-84 and as North Dakota trustee on the Legionnaire Insurance Trust from 1985 to the present time.

Draeb also has served on various department and national committees, including six years on the National Convention Commission.

Lester Mutschelknaus served as 7th district representative for Boys State 1993-94. At the 1994 spring district meeting, he was selected to serve as 7th district vice-commander.

Don Herrly won the Arnold Stockstad Award for having the largest percentage of posts equaling or surpassing their previous year’s membership while he served as 7th district commander 1990-1991. He was the western region department vice commander 1991-92 and the department commander 1993-94. Also, in 1994, he was appointed vice-chairman of the National Americanism Council.

Post Programs

Children and youth always have been given top priority by Post 100. Boys are sent to Boys State each year. School awards are presented to outstanding senior athletes and musicians on Awards Day. The post gives substantial financial support to Hebron’s summer recreation program and has sponsored American Legion, Babe Ruth and Pee Wee baseball programs.

A lighted brick wall, listing all deceased veterans is located at the Legion mound near the Hebron City Hall. Memorial services are held here each year for Memorial Day. A post color guard and firing squad participate in the services. At that time, the roll of deceased veterans is read. Flags are placed on all servicemen’s graves in Hebron and area cemeteries. A Memorial cemetery of crosses, bearing the names of all deceased veterans, is set up behind the Legion mound. The post color guard and firing squad also provide graveside military honors when requested by families of deceased veterans.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is image-82.png

A Veterans Day program is held each year in the high school gym. The highest membership attained by the post was 116 in 1976 and again in 1994. Monthly meetings are held in the Hebron City Hall basement during the winter months. Summer meetings are held at the Boy Scouts cabin and members bring steaks to enjoy before they meet.

Called by visitors a “little oasis on the prairie,” a spring still gushes water near what was US Highway 10 six miles east of Hebron. But long gone is the pipe that provided easy – and free – access to thirsty travelers wanting a cool drink of water.

That simple convenience was a 1934 project of Henry Biffatt, Post 100 at Hebron. It passed from being a popular watering hole into a thing of the past in the early 1940s when wartime travel was severely curtailed.

The combination of a rendering plant nearby and construction of the Interstate Highway 94 interchange also contributed to abandonment of the roadside rest, in the mind of Post 100 member August C. (Gus) Draeb. He remembers having gone there for good coffee water and having seen occupants of parked automobiles refilling canvas water bags slung from front bumpers.

“Volunteer projects such as this certainly have to be relegated to the past as there is no way that you could do something like that on a transcontinental highway without spending thousands of dollars to conform with all the permits and approvals that you would need from the various state and federal agencies. What a shame!”

The Sept. 8, 1935, edition of The Hebron Herald weekly newspaper carried a complimentary Jettier to Post Commander A.E. Funk about the post-sponsored pipe carrying the water 150 feet from the spring to the roadside. Wrote Harold C. Kalmon, adjutant of Albany Post 124 in Chicage: “…It being my first experience in passing through areas in which a shady tree would be welcome, I had forgotten to fill up my thermos bottle, and by the time I arrived in your vicinity my wife and I were ‘somewhat’ thirsty. The information “Drinking Water Ahead” was indeed welcome, and when we stopped in front of the spring arranged by your post it was doubly welcome to me as a Legionnaire.”

In 1933, Post 100 and its World War I members sponsored construction of a dam to lessen damages from flash floods racing down the Little Knife River and through the town and countryside. Located 2 l/2 miles away on the Morton-Stark County line, the dam was built by the CCC, with Legionnaires contributing much manpower to clear creek banks of brush and small trees that would become debris when the water was impounded. The dam washed out about the end of the decade and was not replaced when other structures, including stock ponds, were built.

Post 101 Leeds ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 101, Leeds Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Third District and located in Leeds, North Dakota.

Charter

The Leeds Post 101, initially the William Whalen Post 101, received its national organizational charter on November 24, 1919. The Post disbanded and its charter was cancelled on May 17, 1928. The Post reorganized and received its second national organizational charter on March 29, 1946.

The American Legion was organized in the Leeds area after World War I as the William Whalen Post 101. It was named after William Whalen, who was the first casualty from this area. He served with the American Expeditionary Forces in France.

Fifteen veterans signed the charter, which was issued August 4, 1919. The Post received its national organizational charter on November 24, 1919. Thirty-five eligible veterans joined the same year. There were only two commanders to serve this post – E. D. Marriot for four years and George Gylnquist from 1923- 1925 when the post disbanded. The Post’s charter was officially cancelled on May 17, 1928. Leeds ND

After World War II, the Legion reorganized and the post was issued a new charter with a new name. The Leeds area had three servicemen who died during this war: Raymond Strand, Army Air Force (Europe); Marine Louis DesForge (Iwo Jima); and Carrol McGarvey of the Navy (Atlantic Action). To choose a name was difficult and to use three names would be cumbersome, so Leeds Post 101 was granted a charter March 23, 1946, with 15 veterans signing the charter. The first commander was Philip Kjelmyr and R. J. Montogomery, first adjutant.

Namesake

The American Legion was organized in the Leeds area after World War I as the William Whalen Post 101.   He was born in Benson County New York September 22, 1888.    He enlisted in the North Dakota National Guard on August 20, 1917.  He served overseas in France from December 11, 1917 until his death on January 16, 1918.  He was buried at Leeds, North Dakota.  After World War II, the Legion reorganized and the post was issued a new charter with a new name. The Leeds area had three servicemen who died during this war: Raymond Strand, Army Air Force (Europe); Marine Louis DesForge (Iwo Jima); and Carrol McGarvey of the Navy (Atlantic Action). To choose a name was difficult and to use three names would be cumbersome, so Leeds Post 101 was granted a charter March 23, 1946.

History

Post Home

In 1946, the post purchased the A.O.U.W. Hall for its headquarters. This building was one of the first schoolhouses

in Leeds. In 1950, remodeling and modernization of the building began. The Mother’s Memorial Stone which had been situated in the Great Northern Memorial Site was moved and placed in front of the hall.

In 1979, it was decided to sell the Legion Hall and build a new home for the Legion. A corner lot on Main Street was given to the Legion by owner-veteran Kermit Johnson for the site of the new building. At this same time, it was realized in the community that there was a need for some sort of community center in Leeds. With this in mind the Legion, after the sale of the hall, gave the funds to some Leeds citizens. This provided them with the opportunity to get matching funds from the government for the center. The Legion then provided the site for this center by donating its corner lot to the group.

This center has become the hub for most Leeds activities and the meeting place for Leeds organizations – including Leeds Post 101. The War Mother’s Memorial Stone was placed at the Firemen’s Memorial Park.

The cornerstone at the building reads: “This Cornerstone dedicated to those who died and served – WW I, WW II, Korea and Vietnam.” The Legion is represented on the Leeds Community Center board of directors.

Post Programs

The Leeds Legion Post 101 has been active in local activities. It has financed Legion, Babe Ruth and Pee Wee Baseball, sponsored boys to North Dakota Boys State and high school students to leadership training in Washington, DC.

Memorial Day is always observed with a guest speaker, color guard, firing squad, Taps and a dinner by the Legion’s Auxiliary.

A color guard, firing squad and Taps are always provided for the military rites at the funerals of our veterans.

The post furnishes and places grave markers on the graves of veterans. On Memorial Day flags are put on all these markers.

Post 102 Van Hook ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 102, Charlie Beck Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Ninth District and located in Van Hook, North Dakota.

Charter

The Charlie Beck Post 102 received its national organizational charter in late November 1919. Due to the flooding from the Garrison Dam project, the Post merged into the Beck-Sherven Post 290 at New Town, ND and its charter was cancelled on August 30, 1953.

Namesake

Charles William Beck was born in Hot Springs, Arkansas on October 7, 1893.  He enlisted in the North Dakota National Guard at Minot on July 23, 1917.  He served overseas in France from December 15, 1917 until he was killed in action on July 18, 1918.  He was buried in the American cemetery at Aisne, France.  He was posthumously awarded the Cross of Gallantry and the Silver Star for his especially meritorious service.  Due to the flooding from the Garrison Dam project, the Post merged into the Beck-Sherven Post 290 at New Town, ND and its charter was cancelled on August 30, 1953.

History

Post Officers/Membership

Post YearCommanderAdjutantMembership
1919A. T. OlsonPaul T. Broz25
1919-20A. T. OlsonPaul T. Broz56
1920-21A. T. OlsonPaul T. Broz44
1921-22Paul T. BrozA. T. Olson54
1922-23Arthur T. OlsonO. H. Lofgren53
1923-24F. J. TraynorRalph Satermo27
1924-25Jake S. LenartzF. J. Traynor27
1925-26John G. OlsonG. W. Williams47
1926-27W. E. MalloyW. W. Andersgord31
1927-28E. J. NestavalJohn G. Olsen42
1928-29G. W. WilliamsL. S. Lenartz59
1929-30Ray LaRockJohn G. Olson36
1930-31William MalloyJohn G. Olson57
1931-32Arthur R. NewnanJ. S. Lenartz24
1932-33Paul T. BroszJ. S. Lenartz47
1933-34Ralph SatermoJohn G. Olson22
1934-35Herman O. MalmedalJohn G. Olson21
1935-36Marion N. BruceJohn G. Olson19
1936-37Marion N. BruceRalph Satermo31
1937-38Otis HaugeJohn G. Olson19
1938-39Dan W. PhillippiJohn G. Olson16
1939-40Dan W. PhillippiJohn G. Olson21
1940-41John S. SmithJohn G. Olson20
1941-42John S. SmithJohn G. Olson17
1942-43Knudt LeRoy EsterbyJohn G. Olson19
1943-44Knudt LeRoy EsterbyJohn G. Olson24
1944-45John S. SmithJohn G. Olson29
1945-46Matthias SchuelkeJohn G. Olson58
1946-47Arnold M. SevalsonJohn G. Olson63
1947-48Erwin A. VentschJohn G. Olson58
1948-49C. A. SchuelkeJohn G. Olson60
1949-50Gerhard A. StenersonJohn G. Olson55
1950-51Winton G. SwensonJohn G. Olson64
1951-52John Schmaltz, Jr.John G. Olson60
1952-53William K. BastMatthias Schuelke22
1953-54Post merged into the Beck-Sherven Post 290 at New Town

Post 103 Kensal ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 103, John Florhaug Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Fourth District and located in Kensal, North Dakota.

Charter

The John Florhaug Post 103 received its national organizational charter on November 26, 1919.

The first meeting of what was to become John Florhaug Post 103 was held on December 9, 1919, at Kensal. Its purpose was to elect temporary officers and adopt a constitution and by-laws. Twenty-two veterans, who were eligible to join, attended. An application for charter of The American Legion, which had been signed by 16 members and submitted to state headquarters, requested that the post charter be issued in the name of John Florhaug; who was killed in action in France on October 4, 1918. He had been wounded in action on August 22, 1918, and had spent three weeks in a hospital before returning to the front lines.

The first post commander Was Clifford Collison, and A. H. Scofield was the first adjutant.

Namesake

John Florhaug was born in Nordre Osterdal, Norway on August 6, 1893.  He enlisted in the North Dakota National Guard at Harvey, North Dakota on July 20, 1917.  He served overseas in France from December 13, 1917 until he was killed in action at Meuse-Argonne France on October 4, 1918.  He had been previously wounded in combat on August 21, 1918.  He was initially buried in France but his remains were returned to the United States on October 10, 1921 and he was then buried at Kensal, North Dakota.

History

Post Programs

The post has raised funds through the years to finance Legion, Babe Ruth and Pee Wee baseball as well as to give support to many other youth activities. Each year since 1948 the post has sponsored boys to North Dakota Boys State, usually sending two boys.

Memorial Day has always been sponsored by the post, with the Color Guard, Firing Squad and other members taking part. A speaker is arranged for the annual event and the school band participates. The ceremonial groups go to the cemeteries and hoist the colors, fire a salute to the dead, and taps is played. The post furnishes and places grave markers on the graves of veterans in several cemeteries and, on Memorial Day, flags are put on these markers. The colors and squad units are very active and provide military rites for veteran funerals when requested by the families.

Three area men were killed in World War I, seven in World War II and one in the Korean War. The post membership peaked after WW II and the Korean War at 143 members in 1954.

Post Home

John Florhaug Post 103 was instrumental in urging Stutsman County to levy and allocate funds to build the Kensal Veterans Memorial Building. The structure was dedicated April 30, 1954, by American Legion National Vice-Commander Truman C. Wold of Watford City. Loyal A. Bower was post commander and H.E. (Bud) Nichols was adjutant during that memorable year involving a multitude of arrangements and details surrounding this large project. The building was constructed with a $40,000 allocation that the post received from the Stutsman County Memorial Building Fund. Some $30,000 in donated labor and materials comprised additional costs of the building.

The main auditorium of the building measures approximately 80 by 60 feet. The height of the building from the ground to the peak of the rounding roof is 30 feet. The front of the building is two stories high. On the ground floor the Auxiliary has a 20×30-foot room. The Legion room is located on the second floor and measures 60×20 feet. Also on the second level is a kitchen and store room. During the past four decades this facility has been a busy activity center for the entire community.

Post 104 Hanna ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 104, American Legion Memorial Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Third District and located in Hanna, North Dakota.

Charter

The American Legion Memorial Post 104, initially the Hanna Post 104, received its national organizational charter on November 16, 1919. The Post disbanded on and its charter cancelled on June 15, 1925. The Post reorganized as the American Legion Memorial Post 104 and received its second national organizational charter on November 15, 1946. The Post received its permanent charter on December 4, 1947. On August 4, 1986, Department Headquarters received a letter from the Post Commander Thomas Biby, requesting cancelation of the Post’s charter. According to the Request for Post Charter Cancellation submitted by the Department of North Dakota Adjutant on December 10, 1986:

Post 104 at Hannah had only about four active members in a small community experiencing shrinking population and has no school in town. The majority of their members live away from Hannah. Some older members leave for the winter months, which was the activity season for the Post. Of the 39 paid-up 1986 members in the Post, 37 are PUFL [Paid Up For Life] members who have transferred to neighboring Posts. Another member has transferred to a neighboring Post, and other ’86 member is now deceased.

The Post again disbanded and its charter was cancelled by the National Executive Committee at its meeting on May 7, 1987.

Namesake

Initially named the Hanna Post after the town of Hanna.

Post 105 Dickey ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 105, Fred A. May Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, Tenth District and located in Dickey, North Dakota.

Charter

The Fred A. May Post 105 received its national organizational charter November 26, 1919. On September 20, 1924 the Post’s Legion Hall had a fire that resulted in $40,000 in damages. As a result, the Post lost its records and supplies. On October 6, 1924 it contacted Department Headquarters to request replacement supplies and a duplicate copy of their Permanent Charter.  As a young Post, Post 105 had challenges remitting their memberships in accordance with Department Headquarters’ time schedule. Letters dated March 12, 1924, January 26, 1926, March 12, 1926, and May 3, 1927 show the Post had not remitted any membership dues to Department for the current membership year.  In 1926, the Post had difficulty retaining the minimum 15 members to continue the Post. As of February 22, 1927 the Post had not submitted its list of officers. Later that year, the Post’s charter was revoked for non-payment of membership dues. In August 1948, interest surfaced to reorganize the Post; however, it did not materialize.

Namesake

Fred Arthur May was born in Dickey, North Dakota on January 18, 1891.  He enlisted in the North Dakota National Guard at Fargo on July 28, 1917.  He served overseas in France from December 15, 1917.  He was killed in action on October 10, 1918.  He was buried in the American cemetery at Meuse France.  He was posthumously awarded the Cross of Gallantry and the Silver Star.

History

Awards

In February 1927, Post 105 was the recipient of a Testimonial of Appreciation by Past National Commander, John R. McQuigg in recognition of the Posts service by establishing membership surpassing the average membership of the Post for the past four years.

Post Officers/Membership

Post YearCommanderAdjutantMembership
1919  16
1919-20Clarence TaylorEdward E. Clark25
1920-21Oscar H. McCombDonald E. Freese23
1921-22Roy MicklejohnMark. E. Freese20
1922-23Oscar McCombMark. E. Freese16
1923-24Oscar McCombMark. E. Freese16
1924-25C. M. TaylorOscar H. McComb— 
1925-26C. J. TaylorOscar H. McComb23
1926-27Post Disbanded  

Post 106 Fairmount ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 106, Milton C. Stevenson Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, Tenth District and located Fairmount, North Dakota.

Charter

The Milton C. Stevenson Post 106 received its national organizational charter on December 15, 1919.

There were 22 World War I veterans attending an organizational meeting in Fairmount November 2, 1919. Their intent was to form an American Legion post and to apply for its charter under the name of Milton C. Stevenson. He was the first person from Fairmount killed in the war.

A charter was applied for and the following were the charter members: Leo E. Black, Raymond Mergens, Earl W. Schouweiler, Clermont A. Willilams, Cyril H. Mergens, Reid Smith, John W. Deans, R. J. Allen, Alonzo W. Allen, Henry Ruebish, Clarence Ripley, Delwin B. Claybaugh, Palmer M. Aadland, V.O. Lindquist, and Clyde E. Parriott. After the charter was received, the new officers installed were Harley Swanson, commander; Cyril Mergens, vice-commander; Leo Black, adjutant; Paul Thompson, finance officer; Vic Lundquist, historian; Clyde Parriott, chaplain, and Alonzo Allen, sergeant-at-arms.

Namesake

The namesake for the Fairmount American Legion post, Milton C. Stevenson, is buried in a grave located in the Oise-Aise American Cemetery, Seringes-et-Nesles, Aisne, France. He served overseas from 15, 1917, to death on July 19, 1918. He was cited posthumously for gallantry action and especially meritorious service, to include the Silver Star.

History

Early Programs

The first order of business by this new post was the creation of an entertainment committee, which was given a significant responsibility. A local veteran returned home badly wounded and needed assistance for his family. A dance was held on New Year’s Eve of 1919. The records do not show what the admission price was, but the gross receipts were $171.55. The expenses for the dance were as follows: orchestra – $29, printing – $9, hall rent –

$15, cash prizes – $4 and war tax- $16.80. The net proceeds were $97.75. Dances, card parties, community plays and father-son banquets were a steady source of fundraising to help all disabled vets.  As the years progressed, other community endeavors were taken on by The American Legion and the Legion Auxiliary. They funded a basketball team in 1920. They have funded Boy Scouts, Babe Ruth, and American Legion Baseball, oratorical contests, coloring book contests.

In 1923, the post started purchasing grave markers for all deceased members in cemeteries surrounding the Fairmount area. Rifles were purchased in 1923.

Post Home

It is not known were the initial meetings were held but in 1920, the post rented the IOOF-Masonic Hall for $30 per month plus custodial, fuel, and lights charges. Later, a 1 log cabin in the Fairmount Park was utilized. It was built and became home for our post for many years until the membership grew and the quarters became too small. The log cabin stands today; its space is used for storage of park equipment. A larger building on Main Street was purchased to hold dances, card parties, roller skating, home talent plays and an occasional stag party.

This all continued until the early 1950s when the building was sold and the Red Owl building was purchased to serve as home for our Legion and Auxiliary. In the 1960s the Drug Store building, which was adjacent to our Legion Hall, was purchased and incorporated into one larger building for Legion and community activities. That building was sold in 1992, at which time the post moved into a new Community Center. Post 106 and its Auxiliary had an active role in building and in the operation of the new center.

Post Auxiliary

The Auxiliary of our Legion post is an active participant in Legion programs. The Auxiliary was organized in 1923 with 115 charter members. The post holds Memorial Day and Veterans Day programs each year with the Auxiliary sharing in the programs. The ladies keep active with summer swimming programs, Girls State and similar activities. They conduct a poppy poster contest with awards presented as a part of the Memorial Day program. The Auxiliary hosts a stew dinner after the annual Veterans Day program. Helen Templeton Prochnow, a member of the Fairmount Legion Auxiliary, was installed as the North Dakota American Legion Auxiliary president on June 24, 1986, in Williston.

Milton C. Stevenson Unit 106 of The American Legion Auxiliary sponsored construction of this obelisk in the Fairmount City Park in 1930 as a memorial to World War I veterans. The four-sided structure is seven feet tall and was created from native rock. The bronze plaque, mounted on this monument, lists the names of veterans from the Fairmount community who served in World War I. Plans are being formulated to honor veterans of World War II, Korea, Vietnam and other wars on similar plaques for the memorial.

Demographics

Fairmount is a small community located in the extreme southeast corner of our state. Its population of 450-500 citizens has remained quite constant during the past 70 years. In World War I, 98 citizens of our community were registered for military training. The Fairmount News printed 107 names of servicemen and women who were serving with a Fairmount mail address during World War II.

There are not any records available as to the number of those who served during the Korean, Vietnam and Gulf wars, but the percentages would be comparable to those involved during the two world wars. We are like so many other communities in North Dakota, wherein our share of the fallen has been to many residents and are to be remembered in our hearts, prayers and eventually a memorial.

Current Programs

Our Legion post is still very active in the American Legion baseball program and has accepted the responsibility of the Babe Ruth baseball program for the past 45 years. These two programs have been the main thrust of our attention and participation in order to maintain an ongoing successful event within our community.

Boys State is another of our annual programs. The Boys State event is held in Fairmount’s northern suburb called Wahpeton. Fairmount High School’s superintendent at the time was prominently involved in helping to bring into existence this outstanding program. An award is given each year to a Boys Stater in memory of Superintendent Arve Dahlen, who was a member of our Legion post.

Membership

Membership is a continuing concern.  Membership since 1919 escalated to an all-time high of 106 in 1959, then slowly declining to our present 1994 membership of 73. The decline is due to deaths and members moving to other areas.

We have the distinction of having an active member who joined in 1919. He has 75 years of continuous membership. C.R. “Whitey” Swanson turned 96 years of age in 1994 and is still very active. He enjoys an occasional shot of Jack Daniels, which is made all the more enjoyable if it is someone else’s Jack Daniels.

The need to strengthen and maintain our Legion and Auxiliary organizations is a known and accepted fact. This primary fact is based in the honor we pay to patriotism of the past and the hope we express for the future.

Over the years many ideas have been used to sign up members and maybe we should choose the most successful of all gimmicks: radio and newpaper ads, personal contacts, etc., and use them again and again until success is achieved. That gimmick (challenge) was used by our post in 1938, producing good results. Perhaps the challenge should be issued again.

Post Commanders

Post YearPost Commander
1919-20Harley A. Swanson
1920-21Clifford Wetherbee
1921-22D.B. Claubaugh
1922-23Paul M. Thomnpson
1923-24O.C. Charboneau
1924-25R.A. Mergens
1925-26E.G. Anton
1926-27Earl Schouweiler
1927-28R.J. Allen
1928-29L.F. Murphy
1929-30C.A. Williams
1930-31H.D. Rafferty
1931-32William J. Campbell
1932-34A.M. Dahlen
1934-35William J. Campbell
1935-36George Cline
1936-37Archie Lamberg
1937-38C.R. Swanson
1938-39DeWitt E. Myers
1939-40W. Fleenor
1940-41E.G. Reubish
1941-42C.R. Swanson
1942-43Lawrence Holden
1943-44Frank Hermes
1944-45H.R. Swanson
1945-46Henry Kuddes
1946-48Harry Astrup
1948-51Urban Zentgraf
1951-53Dale Luick
1953-55Adolph Zentgraf
1955-56Bernadine Luick
1956-57Clayton Oberle (Part)
1956-59Ed Kurfist
1959-60Alva Beeghly
1960-61Rodney Rosenkranz
1961-62Steve Campbell
1962-63Kermit Rosendahl
1963-64Lourn Sund
1964-65Donald Miller
1965-66Lester Pauling
1966-67Leander Braun
1967-68Willard Schroeder
1968-69Dave Jenny
1969-70Richard Schmit
1970-71Ed Campbell
1971-72Duane Stiles
1972-73Delmer Steffens
1973-74Robert Peters
1974-75Merle Rubish
1975-76Aloysius Meyer
1976-77Jerome Kutzer
1977-78Robert Meyer
1978-79Ronald Swanson
1979-80Ed Krump
1980-81Dave Roach
1981-84Jim Axtman
1984-85Daryl Thompson
1985-86Vincent Humble
1986-87Aloysius Meyer
1987-88Melvin Muehler
1989-90Mel Kaehler
1990-93Bob Lewis
1993-94Donald Miller

Post 107 Crystal ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 107, Clifford-Lane Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, Second District and located in Crystal, North Dakota.

Charter

The Clifford-Lange Post 107, initially the Stearn-Lane Post 107, received its national organizational charter on December 15, 1919.

Namesake

Most likely the Post was originally named after John Nelson Stearns who was born in Crystal, North Dakota on November 25, 1886.  He was inducted at Cavalier on September 5, 1918 and died on October 5, 1918.  The renaming of the Post then was likely named after Clifford Lane who was born in Crystal, North Dakota on Aril 25, 1893.  He was inducted into the United States Army at Caviler, North Dakota on May 27, 1918.  He served overseas from July 6, 1918 until he was killed in action on September 29, 1918.  He was buried at the American Cemetery at Meuse, France.

Post 108 Havana ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 108, Anderson-Wortman Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, Tenth District and located in Havana, North Dakota.

Charter

The Anderson-Wortman Post 108 received its national organizational charter on December 15, 1919.

Namesake

John Gottfred Anderson was born in Sweden on March 19, 1892.  He was inducted at Forman, North Dakota on March 29, 1918.  He served overseas in France from May 3, 1918 until he died on December 11, 1918.  He was buried at the American Cemetery in Meuse, France.  Clyde Earl Wortman was born in Hixton, Wisconsin on March 3, 1894.  He was inducted at Forman, North Dakota on June 24, 1918.  He served overseas in France from August 17, 1918 until his death on October 11, 1918.  He was buried at the American Cemetery in Meuse France.

Post 109 Portal ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 109, Wood-Roan Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Sixth District and located in Portal, North Dakota.

Charter

The Wood-Roan Post 109 received its national organizational charter on December 15, 1919.

Namesake

Bert Oscar Wood was born in Newton, Wisconsin on February 6, 1890.  He enlisted in the North Dakota National Guard at Minot, North Dakota on July 26, 1917.  He served overseas in France from December 15, 1917 until he was killed in action on July 19, 1918.  He was buried at Portal, North Dakota.  Clarence Patrick Roan was born in Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin on March 13, 1899.  He enlisted at Minot, North Dakota on May 22, 1917.  He served overseas in France from July 20, 1917 until he was wounded in action and died on October 9, 1918.  He was buried in the American cemetery, Meuse, France and was reburied in Portal, North Dakota.  Among other awards and decorations, he was awarded the Silver Star posthumously.

Post 110 Wildrose ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 110, Ludvig Coy Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Ninth District and located in Wildrose, North Dakota.

Charter

The Ludvig Coy Post 110 received its national organizational charter on December 15, 1919.

In 1919, a group of World War I veterans organized the Ludvig Coy Post 110. The charter was granted on December 15, 1919. The charter members were: Olaus B. Lia, Torbjorn T. Teiten, Daniel A. Tinholt, Christopher O. Trytten, George Holter, Palmer Peterson, T. Jorgenson, Randy Peterson, Carl B. Rundhaug, Jack Robertson, Fred Herman, Carl Thorpe, William Damschen, Otto Walfrid, and Albert N. Holter. The first post commander was T.T. Teiten

Namesake

Ludvig Coy, for whom American Legion Post 110 is named, gave his life in the service of his country. He was born in Choclin, Russia, May 11, 1893, and later came to the United States and became a citizen. His brothers, Adolf and

Steve Coy, farmed near Wildrose in Divide County. Ludvig Coy registered for the draft in Divide County. He enlisted in the Infantry at Minot, ND, in October 1917, and completed brief training at Jefferson Barracks, MO, on November 16, 1917. He served overseas in France with Company I, 38th Infantry, and was involved in action at Aisne and Champagne-Marne. He was killed in action; there is a discrepancy in dates in various sources, but perhaps he was wounded on July 16, 1918, and died on September 7, 1918, He is buried in the Oise-Aisne American Cemetery, Seringes-et-Nesles, Aisne, France.

History

Service Beyond the Post

There are 69 members enrolled in the post for 1994. Members of the post who have served as 9th District commanders include Claude Soine (1958-59) and Kenneth Vatne (1989-90). Kenneth Vatne has also served as regional department vice commander (1990-91) and on the state athletic committee (1991-92 to date).

Post Home

For many years the meeting place for the post was the Legion Hall on Main Street. This was used for all the Legion meetings and other Legion functions. The American Legion also for a time owned a large dance hall in Wildrose, where many community activities took place. Ludvig Coy Post 110 has never had a Legion Club with a restaurant or bar as many other communities have had.

In 1978 a golf association was formed in Wildrose, and in 1979 the golf association and The American Legion, with the help of the community, built a clubhouse. This building has a large meeting room and kitchen facilities. In addition to being the regular meeting place of the Legion post, it has been used for meetings by different organizations, wedding dances, suppers and other activities. Along with the nine-hole golf course completed in 1979, this has been a center for many community activities.

Post Programs

When there were more people living in the area, American Legion baseball, as well as amateur baseball for older players in the area, was an important part of the entertainment in Wildrose. It has been many years since Wildrose was able to field an American Legion baseball team, although some of our boys have participated in other towns, such as Ray, Crosby and Noonan.

Over the years, many Wildrose boys have participated in Boys State, the Legion’s week-long citizenship camp.

The post used to send at least two boys every year when there were more students in our school. Now there aren’t always any boys in the junior class to send to Boys State.

Annual events of the post include a Memorial Day program. This has consisted of a program at the school, from which the post colors and rifle squad march to the city park for a salute to our departed comrades. This is followed by a community picnic at the park, or in recent years at the Legion-Golf Clubhouse.

The color guard has participated in parades in Wildrose over the years, as well as county fairs, Legion conventions and anniversary celebrations in neighboring towns. In the 1980s, members of the post purchased American Legion jackets with the post name, which have been used as our uniforms together with belts, gloves and helmet liners. An important activity of the color guard and rifle squad is providing military honors at funerals of our comrades. Because the large number of veterans who joined The American Legion after World War II are getting older, funerals have been happening more often in recent years.

Other events include the Legion birthday party, Veterans Day and Christmas parties. The Legion in recent years also has provided support for fireworks and other activities on the Fourth of July. In election years, the post has helped sponsor forums for the local candidates. Our post has had several members who consider themselves pretty good cooks, so for several years the post served the supper at the annual athletic banquet at the school.

The current commander is Emil Hedlund. Clarence Kragness is the adjutant and Lyle Hansen is the finance officer.

Post Auxiliary

On June 9, 1928, a meeting was held at the Legion Hall under the auspices of the Crosby unit and called together by

Mrs. C.O. Trytten. All the ladies eligible for membership in The American Legion Auxiliary were urged to attend. Mrs. Rosseau of the Crosby unit took charge of the meeting and explained the work of the Auxiliary. It was then decided to form a Wildrose unit and an application for a charter was filled in and signed by 12 ladies eligible for membership.

The signers were Mrs. C.O. (Dena) Trytten, Mrs. A.C. (Anne) Hammer, Mrs. Peder (Anna) Anderson, Mrs. T.T. (Anna) Teiten, Miss Laura B. Highum, Mrs. D.A. (Ellen) Tinholt, Mrs. John (Anne) Holter, Mrs. Fred (Anne) Kleinsmith, Mrs. H.K. (Ragna) Myking, Mrs. Bennie (Agnes) Benson, Mrs. A.N. (Ann) Holter, and Mrs. Carl (Mabelle) Christianson.

The charter was granted June 30, 1928, and signed by Hazel B. Nielson, Department president, Lorna Phillips, Department secretary, Irene Mcintyre Wolbridge, National president, and Emma Hadorn, National secretary.

The Auxiliary has always been involved with sending girls to Girls State and supporting the North Dakota Veterans Home. The ladies have always been willing to lend a hand to help Legion projects. Fundraising for activities has included serving for ball games and auction sales.

Post 111 Binford ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 111, Jonas A. Helland Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, First District and located in Binford, North Dakota.

Charter

The Jonas A. Helland Post 111 received its national organizational charter on December 15, 1919. The Post disbanded and its charter was cancelled on May 6, 1932. The Post reorganized and received its second charter on December 13, 1948.

Namesake

Jonas A. Helland was born at Cooperstown, North Dakota on November 2, 1893.  He was inducted into the United States Army at Cooperstown on March 28, 1918.  He served overseas in France from May 3, 1918 until he died on July 9, 1918.  He was buried in the American Cemetery, Bony, Aisne France.

Post 112 Willow City ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 112, Lyle B. Rich Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Sixth District and located in Willow City, North Dakota.

Charter

The Lyle B. Rich Post 112 received its national organizational charter on December 23, 1919.

Namesake

Lyle Barnes Rich was born in Renville, Minnesota on October 12, 1891.  He enlisted in the Reserve Corps at Baltimore, Maryland in April 1917 and was called into active service on May 27, 1917.  He served overseas in France from June 14, 1917 until his death on December 8, 1917.  He was buried in the American Cemetery, Meuse France.

Post 113 Hannaford ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 113, Mervin J. Armstrong Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, First District and located in Hannaford, North Dakota.

Charter

The Mervin J. Armstrong Post 113 received its national organizational charter on December 23, 1919.

Markus Thoreson contacted 17 World War I ex-servicemen in November 1919 who consented to participate in starting an American Legion post at Hannaford. They signed an application for a post charter which National Headquarters granted on December 23, 1919. The following were elected as the post’s initial officers; Commander, M.A. Thoreson; Vice-Commander, H.H. Hagen; Adjutant, W.A. Eiden; Finance Officer, J.B. Westley; Sergeant-at-Arms, George Bjor; Historian, Erick Stone; Chaplain, O.H. Hoffman. Other charter members were: Soren Krag, Lester Moore, Alfred Swingen, Carl H. Johnson, Bert A. Olson, Peder Falstad, Otelius Aaker, Earl H. Bustrack, Nick C. Cederson and Olaf H. Stafney. These officers held over in 1920.

Namesake

Mervin J. Armstrong was born at Hannaford, North Dakota on October 28, 1897.  He enlisted in the North Dakota National Guard at Fargo on July 4, 1917 and was called into federal service on July 15, 1917.  He served overseas in France from December 15, 1917 until he died on July 18, 1918 of wounds received in combat.  He was initially buried in France and later returned to the United States and reburied at Arlington National Cemetery.  Among other decorations and awards he earned the Silver Star posthumously. 

History

Membership

By the end of 1920, the post’s membership grew to 32. During World War II our community suffered the loss of the following 10 residents: Boyd Charnley, Clifford Fallen, Willard Johnson, Burton Kingsley, Sidney Ohman, Lance Pousette, James Severson, Robert H. Schmidt, C. A. Thompson, and Leonard Trelstad.

Life memberships were awarded to these eight Legionnaires: Dr. O.H. Hoffman, Arthur C. Brown, Carl Heyerdahl, Alfred Skjeret, Sig Romsaas, Thorwald Fuglestad, Ben Matt, and Orval C. Fliflet. Fliflet was decorated by the President of the United States as surviving Jan. 9- May 9, 1945, WW II as a prisoner of war in Germany.

These officers served Post 113 during its 75th Anniversary year: Commander, Jerry Hanson; Vice-Commander, James Everson; Finance Officer, John C. Grover; Adjutant, Roland Johnson; Historian, John Bakken; Chaplain, Curtis Haugen; Sergeant-at-Arms, Mervin Haugen, and Service Officer, Clinton Brown. Our post ended its 1994 membership campaign with 85 members.

Post Programs

The post has sent at least one boy to Boys State nearly every year since 1941. Over the years our local Legion has been involved in improving the swimming area, American Legion Baseball, Boy Scouts of America, and has supported other local youth programs and various state and national Legion projects. Annual post pancake suppers are held for the community.

The American Legion’s Eastern Division bowling tournament was held in Hannaford on three weekends in March of 1974. There were 53 teams, 107 doubles and 216 singles entered. Hannaford also hosted the state roll-off on the following weekend when the best from the west met the best from the east to determine state champions. All roll-off bowlers then were guests of the post for a banquet.

The post decided to clean up the city of Hannaford in the Spirit of ’76 observance of our national bicentennial. This project was started in the fall of 1974 by demolishing the old locker plant and other buildings.

Our post has conducted Memorial Day services every year at the school gymnasium.

Color guard and rifle squad honors have been performed often during military rites for departed members.

Post Ski Slide Project

In 1923 Post Commander Peder Falstad, then considered one of the best skiers in North Dakota, enlisted the support of a number of Legion members to build a good ski slide. It was decided to solicit funds from local businesses on the basis the Legion would make up any deficit, manage the construction and maintain the slide.

With this beginning, an old wind mill tower was purchased and placed on top of the west bank of Bald Hill Creek. The metal tower became the base upon which the 35-meter wooden ski slide was constructed, largely by gratis services of Falstad and Chuck Cole. The new slide, costing $600, was completed and tested by Falstad on Jan. 15, 1924. The first contest was staged on Jan. 24 when six Fargo men took part in the meet. Despite adverse weather, 160 people paid a 25-cent admission to observe the event. Some recommendations led to improving conditions at the bottom of the slide.

The next meet on February 24 was a great success …1,200 people attended. A platform for beginners had been built 12 feet from the top of the tower. The last tournament of the first season was held on March 18. In the following years numerous tournaments were held in Hannaford featuring many skiers, including the most skilled in the region. One tournament included a special train-arranged with the Great Northern Railroad – to bring 103 skiers and spectators from Page to Hannaford.

After the war years, tournament action resumed in March 1949 and attracted an attendance of 2,500. The last tournament at Hannaford in 1950 drew 2,000 outdoor enthusiasts and about 50 out-of-town skiers plus many locals.

The ski project was an asset to the community, and Hannaford legionnaires boasted as having one of the best slides in the northwest, perhaps the only ski slide in the world built and operated by an American Legion post.

The slide was taken down in 1960 after interest in the sport waned. Also, the slide had deteriorated and became a hazard for children.

Recently, our post has been reviewing the era of Bald Hill Creek ski days and Peter Falstad, a national skier who attained the highest honor given an athlete when he was named a member of the U.S. Olympic ski team to compete at Lake Placid, NY, in 1932. A heritage center travel exhibit and the ski area landing for a historical site are ideas being discussed.

 

Post 114 Underwood ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 114, John C. Baar Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Fifth District and located in Underwood, North Dakota.

Charter

The John C. Barr Post 114 received its national organizational charter on December 23, 1919. The Post’s Annual Americanism and Post Activity Report for 1940 reflected “None to Report” with regards to Post activity in the local community.  In a letter to Department Headquarters on February 1, 1948, a Legion member reported that the Post is having difficulty recruiting younger members in light of the recently organized Veteran of Foreign Wars post. He described the condition of Post 114 as a “dead horse” due to the aging members and lack of young eligible veterans. Post 114 disbanded shortly thereafter and its charter was cancelled on October 8, 1959.

Namesake

John C. Baar was born at Sleepy Eye, Minnesota on June 2, 1896.  He enlisted in the North Dakota National Guard at Bismarck on May 7, 1917.  He served overseas in France from December 15, 1917 until he was killed in action on October 6, 1918.  He was buried in the American Cemetery, Meuse, France.  He was posthumously awarded the Silver Star.

History

Awards

In 1939, Post 114 was the recipient of a Citation for Distinguished Services issued by National Headquarters in recognition of the outstanding membership work that the Post had accomplished for the new year.

Post Officers/Membership

Post YearCommanderAdjutantMembership
1919  52
1919-20J. B. TyrrellClarence A. Berg52
1920-21Clarence A. BergMartin L. Snyder51
1921-22H. G. PiperPeter J. Fuchs27
1922-23Peter J. FuchsLloyd M. Standish 
1923-24Lloyd M. StandishHarry Lundin 
1924-25E. J. LarsonH. S. Dillman 
1925-26R. F. PetersPeter J. Fuchs 
1926-27Harry SamuelsonR. J. Peters 
1927-28Harry SamuelsonR. J. Peters 
1928-29R. F. PetersPeter J. Fuchs 
1929-30G. F. SchemppPeter J. Fuchs 
1930-31Rojer J. MetzAlbert E. Wille 
1931-32H. G. RasmussenPeter J. Fuchs 
1932-33Oscar JohnsonHenry Koenig 
1933-34Ben A. SoutherPeter J. Fuchs 
1934-35Rudolph F. HolmeBen A. Souther 
1935-36W. C. AdamsG. F. Schempp 
1936-37Henry KoenigG. F. Schempp 
1937-38Harry W. SamuelsonV. B. Jenson 
1938-39J. L. EiderEmil Wilke 
1939-40Harry W. SamuelsonFred G. Meyers 
1940-41Fred G. MeyersH. G. Rasmussen 
1941-42Fred G. MeyersH. G. Rasmussen 
1942-43Fred G. MeyersMilton W. Johannes 
1943-44Fred G. MeyersMilton W. Johannes 
1944-45Emil WilkeRaymond Koenig 
1945-46Emil WilkeRaymond Koenig 
1946-47Gordon L. ScottNorman S. Maphee 
1947-48Gordon L. ScottNorman S. MacPhee 
1948-49Post Disbanded  

Post 115 Hettinger ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 115, Johnson-Melary Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Eighth District and located in Hettinger, North Dakota.

Charter

The Johnson-Melary Post 115 received its national organizational charter on December 23, 1919.

Namesake

Gerald V. Johnson was born at Lake Odessa, Michigan on February 27, 1896.  He was inducted into the United States Army at Hettinger, North Dakota on September 21, 1917.  He served overseas in France from April 29, 1918 until he was killed in action on October 11, 1918.  He was buried at the American Cemetery in Meuse, France.  Joseph Francis Melary was born in Elkader, Iowa on September 3, 1891.  He was inducted at Hettinger, North Dakota on May 24, 1918.  He served overseas in France from August 9, 1918 until he was killed in action on November 8, 1918.  He was initially buried in the American Cemetery in France and returned to the United States on April 5, 1921 and reburied at Hettinger.

Post 116 Grenora ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 116, Alvin T. Larson Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Ninth District and located in Grenora, North Dakota.

Charter

The Alvin T. Larson Post 116 received its national organizational charter on December 23, 1919.

American Legion Post 116 at Grenora was organized February 10, 1920, and was named after Alvin T. Larson, son of Mr. and Mrs. George Larson. He is buried in St. Olaf Cemetery, rural Grenora.

The charter members were: Frank E. Prim, Max Legge, John D. Jeffrey, C.O. Sletten, Peter C. Jensen, J.M. Stanley, Harry E. Griffen, Marinos Jorgensen, W.G. Peterson, Alfred Aune, Oliver R. Movery, Ernest P. Jensen, Soren C. Jensen, Homer Cornell, Arthur Musgjerd, Odin Richardson, Albert R. Reep, Alvin W. Fulkerson, Henry Stigen, Edward N. Watten, Edwin N. Swenson, Ivan A. Regnier, J.P. Haines, Henry W. Legge, James N. Herbrandson, Benjamin H. Linn, Harvey M. Broughton, and L.E. Wambheim.

The records show that the first commander was L.E. Wambheim and the first adjutant was Albert R. Reep.

Namesake

Alvin T. Larson was born in Ashby, Minnesota on February 7, 1894.  He was inducted into the United States Army at Williston on September 18, 1917 and died January 27, 1918 at Camp Pike, Arkansas.

History

Post Home

Local meetings were held mostly at the call of the commander. During the 1930s, the meetings became more irregular as there were fewer veterans living in the area. On January 29, 1946, 13 members from WW I and 64 new members from WW II got together and set the first Tuesday of each month as the regular meeting date.

In April 1946, a committee was appointed to check on purchasing a land site to build a Legion home for the post. Meetings at that time were held at the City Hall. The amount of $2,200 was loaned from 45 members to begin this project.

The present lots were purchased and some surplus grain bins were used to construct a new home for Post 116. Most of the work was donated by the members; however, some labor had to be hired. The basement and the shell of the building were completed in 1947. The main level was finished in 1951. The Legion home became free of indebtedness in 1963.

Programs

Records show that the first American Legion baseball team played the 1932 season and was coached by J.B. Feldman, assisted by Roy Broadland. Throughout the succeeding years, our team won several district and regional championships. In 1971, our team placed runner-up in the state championship finals. Except for a few brief periods, our post has continued to sponsor a team.

The post has maintained a color guard and firing squad ceremonial team which has been active in providing graveside military honors for deceased veterans. The unit also participates in Memorial Day Services, conducted annually with the cooperation of our American Legion Auxiliary unit.

In celebration of our nation’s bicentennial, our color guard participated in historic “Hands Across the Border” ceremonies on the American-Canadian boundary near Noonan, North Dakota; and Estevan, Saskatchewan. These Legionnaires also marched with their colors in the American Appreciation Day celebration at Weyburn, Saskatchewan, and have carried our colors in numerous State Legion convention parades and at local community events.

Due to their great dedication and service to The American Legion, our post has presented life membership cards to J. Rueben White, Gunder Tollefson, Harry S. Johnson, Roy Lundby, Norris Erickson, Marvin K. Hoff and Marvin T. Skabo. Members who have served as 9th District commander are J. Reuben White, Roy Lundby and Marvin D. Nelson.

Nels A. Anderson, a WW I veteran, was a major benefactor. Upon his death in 1967, our post inherited his small farm in Sheridan County, MT. He also gave Post 116 numerous war bonds. The rental and interest monies earned from these gifts largely supported our American Legion baseball program as well as other Legion programs and contributions to community projects. Anderson is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.

The post officers for our 75th year were as follows: Commander – H. Eugene Peterson, 1st Vice Commander – Franklin Glimm, 2nd Vice Commander – Keith Iverson, Chaplain – Marvin D. Nelson, Historian – Robert Peterson, Sergeant-at-Arms – Gordon Rasmussen, Service Officer, Harry S. Johnson, Finance Officer- Marvin K. Hoff, and Adjutant – Marvin T. Skabo.

Our membership of 97 is made up of veterans from WW II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War and the Gulf.

Post 117 Kindred ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 117, Carl Owen Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, First District and located in Kindred, North Dakota.

Charter

The Carl Owen Post 117, initially the Kindred Post 117, received its national organizational charter on December 23, 1919. On July 28, 1975 the Post renamed itself the Carl Owen Post 117.

Namesake

On July 28, 1975 the Post renamed itself the Carl Owen Post 117.  Carl Ingvald Owen was born in Kindred, North Dakota on September 24, 1895.  He was inducted into the United States Army at Fargo on September 22, 1917.  He served overseas in France from August 23, 1918 and was discharged at Camp Dodge, Iowa on August 26, 1919.

History

Kindred American Legion Post 117 was organized in the Kindred Tribune office November 20, 1919. Of 41 eligible veterans, 27 joined the post. Officers elected for the year were Commander, Carl Owen; Adjutant, Henry Hagen, and Finance Officer, Gerhard Elstad. The permanent charter was issued to the post September 15, 1920.

The post held meetings not only at the Tribune office, but also at the Town Hall, above Larson’s store and later in the back rooms of the Post Office. The formal observance of Memorial Day was inaugurated in 1920. In 1921 the firing squad was organized by Carl Owen, who served as squad leader for the next 25 years. In 1946 the squad relinquished its duties to the second firing squad, which served for 30 years. With the exception of one year while he was in the service, Paul Hertsgaard was the leader of this second group. The third firing squad began service in 1975 under the leadership of Galen Nettum. The squad has participated at every Memorial Day program since its organization, as well as at memorial exercises for veterans and at funerals. A visit to the area cemeteries on

Memorial Day usually has been a part of that day’s ceremony.

Each year the firing squad visits cemeteries, including Barrie, Christiania, Davenport East, Davenport North, Gol, Kindred, Norman, North Pleasant, Perhus and West Prairie. A flag marks each veteran’s grave and a reader announces each veteran’s name.

For many years the Kindred High School marching band (in full uniform) accompanied the firing squad during Memorial Day activities. Later, Myron Dybing, the high school music director, organized a brass ensemble, which replaced the band. This latter group has provided music for the past 27 years.

In December 1928, the Legion sponsored and erected the first community Christmas tree. This project has been part of the program ever since. For many years, the Legionnaires used cars pulling four-wheel trailers or trucks to haul the trees out of the Minnesota woods. Later, trees were donated locally.

In 1946 the Legion purchased a rural schoolhouse that was located on the southeast quarter section 8, Normanna Township, in Cass County. This school, Normanna District 19, School 2, known as the Dahlen School, was purchased for $775. Ivan Rustad donated the east half of lot 17 and all of lot 18, Block 4, John Rustad’s Addition, City of Kindred, to the Legion. He also donated his services in moving the building to this property in Kindred. The building was dedicated on Memorial Day 1948.

The Kindred post has always supported a very active recreation program. For many years, it has sponsored American Legion baseball, a rifle club and a summer recreation program. In 1953, the Legion Baseball team won the Class B State Championship.

Post 117 also supports other youth activities. Usually several candidates are chosen to attend Boys State and Girls State. Through donations, the post has acquired a number of hospital items, including wheelchairs, hospital beds and crutches, which are loaned to anyone needing them.

With the cooperation of the Kindred Park Board, plus cash donations and $10,500 from the Cass County Veterans War Memorial Fund, a 30-by-60-foot building was erected in 1955. Officially named the Veterans Memorial Building, this structure is used for recreation, community meetings and Legion activities. It is located in the Kindred city park and was dedicated in 1956.

Lawrence Larsen served the greatest number of terms (eight) as post commander; Marcellus Erickson served the greatest number of terms (ten) as post adjutant. The first life membership given by the Kindred post was presented to Carl Owen in December 1967 in honor of his long and active service.

In recognition of 50 years of continuous membership, Erwin Dahlen, Ted Perhus, Henry Graff and Adolph Johnson were given life membership in 1969. This is the highest honor that a Legion post can bestow.

In 1975 the post changed its name from Kindred American Legion Post 1 17 to Kindred American Legion Carl Owen Post 117, recognizing Owen’s many hours of work. In 1986, the Kindred post began charitable gaming. Most of the proceeds have been contributed to local charities.

The Kindred post decided to use some of the charitable gaming proceeds to erect a monument honoring area veterans. This monument is located in the Kindred city park, just north of the Veterans Memorial Building.

The eight-foot high center of the monument is black polished granite. The 172 names inscribed on the gray-colored granite wings are listed according to wars in which the servicemen and women served; an initial following each name indicates each veteran’s burial site.

If the veteran has been a member of the Kindred post, or has been buried in one of the cemeteries that the Kindred rifle squad honors, that individual’s name is inscribed on the monument.

The memorial was dedicated on Memorial  Day, May 27, 1991. The ceremony began with a fly over by four F-16 aircraft from the North Dakota Air National Guard. Guest speakers were Maj. Gen. Alexander P. Macdonald, N.D. Adjutant General who formerly resided at Davenport; U.S. Air Force Maj. Gen. Darrol G.Schroeder (Ret.), also of Davenport, and Lt. Col. Lyle M. Andvik, N.D. Air National Guard, Kindred.

The post is grateful to its sister organization, the Kindred Legion Auxiliary, which has helped the post in many ways. At one time the Auxiliary paid a fuel bill when the Legion was in financial difficulty. On December 31, 1994, the membership of Kindred American Legion Carl Owen Post 117 was 67.

Post Auxiliary

The Kindred American Legion Auxiliary unit was organized on March 14, 1928. The 12 charter members held their first meeting in the home of Mrs. Martin Larsen. Officers elected were: President, Mrs. Alf Ringen; Vice-President, Miss Keziah Evingson; Secretary, Mrs. Peter L. Nelson, and Treasurer, Mrs. Marie Anderson.

The main objective of the Auxiliary is to support the Legion in its endeavors. In order to promote these endeavors, the Auxiliary has contributed in numerous ways and completed many projects. The unit sells poppies every May; in addition, it organizes a poppy poster contest for Kindred fourth and fifth graders. The Auxiliary cooperates with the post in sponsoring local students attending North Dakota Boys State and Girls State. The unit remembers the teachers and staff at the Kindred Public School in observance of Education Week and encourages students to enter the Americanism essay contest.

The unit contributes to the Child Welfare Foundation, the Children and Youth programs, the North Dakota Veterans Home in Lisbon and the State Mental Hospital in Jamestown. In the past the Auxiliary has contributed to the iron lung, to the sanitarium at San Haven and to Camp Grassick. Knitting mittens and stockings was at one time an important part of members’ work as well. For many years, the unit has provided a float for Kindred’s homecoming parade. As a community service project, the members plant and care for flowers around the flag pole in the city park.

The Auxiliary has raised money to support contributions and projects in various ways. For example, they collected scrap iron and old rubber tires, presented plays, sold raffle tickets and sponsored bake sales. More recently, they have served meals at the annual meetings of the Kindred Farmers Elevator and the United Oil Co.

Maintaining membership has always been an important goal. On December 31, 1994, the membership of the Kindred American Legion Auxiliary was 69. The Auxiliary is proud to carry on the work and be a part of the largest patriotic women’s organization in the world.

Post 118 Gilby ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 118, Peter J. Bjerklie Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, Second District and located in Gilby, North Dakota.

Charter

The Peter J. Bjerklie Post 118 received its national organizational charter on December 23, 1919.

Namesake

Peter J. Bjerklie-Information not available

Post 119 Plaza ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 119, Bangen-Moen Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Sixth District and located in Plaza, North Dakota.

Charter

The Bangen-Moen Post 119, initially the Samuel E. Hamilton Post 119, received its national organizational charter on December 23, 1919.

The Post disbanded and its charter was cancelled on June 15, 1925. The Post reorganized as the Bangen-Moen Post 119 and received its second national charter on July 13, 1945.

In October 1919, about 20 WW I veterans began organizing an American Legion post at Plaza. Named in honor of Samuel E. Hamilton, who was killed in action August 4, 1918, in France, Post 119 was chartered December 23, 1919. At a special meeting held January 21, 1922, the members present decided to discontinue the post. The reason was that about two-thirds of the membership had moved away, with no prospects moving back into the community. The Post’s charter was officially cancelled on June 15, 1925.

As WW II veterans began returning home, the post at Plaza was organized in the summer of 1945, enrolling 46 members during the 1945-46 year. The Post then received its second national organization charter.

Namesake

The post was renamed Bangen-Moen Post 119 in honor of SSgt. Quentin R. Bangen and Sgt. Gerhard P. Moen, both from Plaza, who died in WW II battles. Shipped overseas in October 1942, Bangen served in the North African Theater, was awarded the Purple Heart and lost his life in Italy September 11, 1944. Moen served in the Infantry in Europe, was also awarded the Purple Heart and was killed June 11, 1944, during the Normandy invasion.

History

Post Home

In 1949, a Mountrail County Memorial Fund was established as a means to memorialize the services of veterans. Providing a source of funds through a mill levy, the program enabled veterans organizations of communities within the county to designate a project that recognizes veterans and serves a need in the community.

The Legion discussed many projects before deciding to lease the Plaza Community Hall for 99 years and to improve it to their specifications. The City Council approved the lease in February 1952, and the renovations were completed in March 1958.

From a dingy basement room to a new and beautifully furnished lounge that would serve as a meeting room for the

Legion and its Auxiliary, was the achievement of Bangen-Moen Post 119. The 25’x45′ hall was remodeled with modern design. The floor tile cover was a pattern of blue, gold and black. The walls were covered with knotty pine halfway up, and acoustical tile was installed on the ceiling. An additional room was also prepared for use by other groups needing a place to meet. A trophy case was designed and built by Roy Sandstrom. Russell Sailor did a lot of the paint and varnish work. Ben and Bruce Bockness and Wes Johnson helped with the construction. A kitchen was also included in the remodeling. The Auxiliary prepared a luncheon for about 250 people attending the open house and inspection of the new rooms.

Programs

Post 119 holds a Memorial Day service each year. Twenty white crosses, with a flag at each cross, are placed in rows at the schoolyard. The annual service closes with a firing squad salute, and Taps is played to honor all those who have served their country. Gold Star Mothers are honored after the service, and a luncheon is provided by the Auxiliary. The post has placed Legion markers at grave sites of all veterans in the Plaza cemeteries and, prior to Memorial Day, a flag is placed at each of those graves.

Plaza has had many citizens who served in our nation’s wars. Among them were the following that died during their service: Ted Bradflay, Olaf S. Haang, Samuel E. Hamilton, Bennie Larson and Charles Larson in WW I, and Quentin R. Bangen, Arnold Freelander, Vernon Jenson, Arthur Johnson, Gerhard P. Moen, Joseph Myhre, Palmer Onsgard, Marvin Ringoen and Leonard Smestad in WW II. Plaza also had four sons who were prisoners of war during WW II: Sgt. Walter Wheeling was a prisoner of the Japanese for three and one-half years; Sgt. Kenneth Paulson was a German prisoner, and Sgt. Arnold Postovit and Cpl. Lawrence Christenson were captured in Italy and held as prisoners in Germany.

The Plaza post has a Jong history of service to the community. During Plaza’s Birthday Celebration every year, the post serves a pancake and sausage breakfast in the park. The post has held some dances to raise funds to support its programs: Boys Scouts, Legion Baseball, Music Camp, Girls and Boys State, the Government Close-Up in Washington, DC, and an Oratorical Contest. The post also presents the Legion School Award to one girl and to one boy graduating from high school.

Post 119 has played a large part in providing services to veterans as well as social services in the Plaza community.

During construction of the new high school in 1962-63, the Legion gave permission for the new Legion meeting room and the civic room to be used as classrooms. Later the post donated a new scoreboard for the school gym.

Plaza is a small city of about 200 population. Most of the farming in the area is small grain, with some ranching. There are about 55 oil wells in the area. The membership of the post in 1993-94 was 23 and the officers were: Commander, Richard Osness; Vice-Commander, Steve Anderson; Adjutant, Steve Hallingstad; Chaplain, Melvin Jensrud; Sergeant at Arms, Marvin Dyke; and Historian, O.L. “Ozzie” Westgard.

Post Auxiliary

The Plaza Auxiliary was formed in 1945 with 15 charter members, and the Auxiliary ladies have been just as active in their service to the community as have our Legion members. In addition to serving the luncheon after the Memorial Day service, the Auxiliary has also given Birthday and Christmas parties for the Legion every year and has been a steady supporter of many of the post’s programs and activities. The unit has been a staunch supporter of Girls State and donates many flags to the school and to the Senior Citizens Center. Both organizations are committed toward mutual helpfulness to our fellow citizens, “For God and Country.”

Post 120 Pingree ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 120, Fallon-Siltman Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Fourth District and located in Pingree, North Dakota.

Charter

The Fallon-Siltman Post 120 received its national organizational charter on December 23, 1919. In a March 17, 1924 letter Department Headquarters, Legionnaire Arthur Ratzloff reported that since his move to Jamestown (due to business requirements) the interest by the remaining Legionnaires to keep the Post active and performing community service dropped off significantly. The Post disbanded in the spring of 1924 and its charter was cancelled on June 15, 1925.

Namesake

No information available on Mr. Fallon.  Eldred Elmore Siltman was born in Browersville, Minnesota on April 15, 1892.  He enlisted in the North Dakota National Guard at Jamestown on June 17, 1917.  He served overseas in France from December 15, 1917.  He was severely wounded on July 18, 1918 and died March 16, 1919.  His remains were returned to the United States and he was buried at Browersville, Minnesota. 

History

Post Officers/Membership

Post YearCommanderAdjutantMembership
1919  28
1919-20Arthur H. RatzlaffJ. B. McManus28
1920-21Jack McCarthyJ. B. McManus18
1921-22No RecordArthur H. Ratzlaff18
1922-23R. B. HuntArthur H. Ratzlaff13
1923-24Post Disbanded  

Post 121 Parshall ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 121, Arthur Solie Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Ninth District and located in Parshall, North Dakota.

Charter

The Arthur Solie Post 121 received its national organizational charter on December 23, 1919.

Arthur Solie Post 121 of Parshall, North Dakota, is the first American Legion post established in Mountrail County. The post was organized by 15 members November 28, 1919. The charter members were Henry Sell, L.J. Madsen, A.H. Sell, J.H. Withers, E. Kjelstrup, H. Arnson, M. Sorenson, J. O’Hanlon, A.J. Cremer, C. Christyan, J.B. Brendal, B.G. Shubert, R.L. Bard, N. Nelson, and J.A. Solien.

Namesake

Arthur Thomas Solie was born in Ada, Minnesota on March 12, 1891.  He was inducted at Stanley, North Dakota on March 29, 1918.  He served overseas in France from June 14, 1918 until he was killed in action on September 15, 1918.  Arthur Solie, was the first soldier from the Parshall area who was killed in action September 15, 1918, during World War I. He is buried at St. Mihiel American Cemetery, Thiaucourt, Merurthe-et-Moselle, France, in Grave 18, Row 18, Block D.

Programs

Probably our greatest achievement on the local level was our bicentennial project of erecting a memorial monument in 1976 with the names of our post members carved in black India granite. The memorial was built at the South Cemetery with lights and benches so that the flag can be flown 24 hours a day in devotion to our department comrades. In 1987, we installed lights at the North Cemetery, enabling us to fly the flag there 24 hours a day.

Court Shubert was the only surviving American Legion member from North Dakota in 1979 who had attended the Paris Caucus in mid-March 1919. He was one of about a thousand men of the American Expeditionary Force who assembled in Paris, France, to form a new organization of ex-servicemen, which became known as The American Legion. The Parshall Legion was so proud that Court was honored as a guest in the Legion’s 1979 national convention parade at Houston, Texas. Court was one of seven brothers, who served in WW I and WW II, of whom one was killed in action. Some other brothers also served in both wars.

World War II was a very sad era for our small town. We had five young men killed in action during the war, which was a terrible blow to a small community where everybody knows one another.

Our first loss was Alvin Risan, MM1, U.S. Navy, killed in action, August 9, 1942, on the U.S.S Quincy in the Battle of Savo Island that was called the “slot” in narrow waters of the Solomon Islands.

1st Lt. Rueben Rudd served with the 2nd Marine Division troops which had distinguished themselves in battle at Guadalcanal.  He was killed in action November 27, 1943, by a Japanese sniper bullet on the Island of Tarawa in the Gilbert Island chain. Tarawa was the scene of some of the fiercest fighting in WW II and became known as Bloody Tarawa. Rueben is buried at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (the Punch Bowl) at Honolulu, Hawaii.

Pfc. Sylvin Baker, U.S. Army, was killed in action June 6, 1944, on Normandy Beach in the greatest invasion of all time. He is buried in Plot I, Row 7, Grave 7, Normandy, France.

Pvt. Gladwin Roberts, 82nd Airborne, U.S. Army, was killed in action June 15, 1944, in France three days before his 20th birthday. He had written home a short note to tell of the “hanging trees.” This is what the American parachutist termed the trees in France when paratroopers got hung up in the branches and lost their lives.

Lt. Frederick Hankins, U.S. Navy pilot, was killed in action December 14, 1944, in the Battle of Leyte Gulf as it is collectively called. The Parshall airport is named after him.

Post Home

From 1919 to the 1980s, the post met in various rooms in the Memorial Hall and also had an old converted school house in the 1950s. In the 1980s, the Legion bought the old hotel that we repaired and were quite proud of. However, after it burned down, we built a new home for our post in 1993. We have over 6,500 sq. ft. in our building, with meeting rooms, hardwood dance floor, restrooms, full kitchen (with walk-in coolers), electric heat and air conditioning. The Legion post’s building is used very extensively for many types of meetings, parties, birthdays and special functions. It has been the focal point of the community besides being the Legion’s pride and joy.

Membership

During the bicentennial year, Post 121 hit the century membership mark for the first time, then growing to our peak of 130 members in 1983. Since then, our enrollment has fluctuated between 115 and 130. Like all Legion posts, it is a struggle to make ends meet, but will make it!

Post Auxiliary

Aiding the volunteer efforts of Legionnaires in serving the community has been our wonderful Auxiliary unit. These ladies, who have been supportive and uplifting in all our endeavors, are truly a tremendous silent, often unnoticed, service in the Parshall community. Our members raise money with weekly bingo and building rentals to support our Legion programs such as Memorial Day, youth programs and other activities.

Post 122 Oberon ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 122, Gerald A. Haskin Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Third District and located in Oberon, North Dakota.

Charter

The Gerald A. Haskin 122 received its national organizational charter on December 23, 1919.

A group of World War I veterans met on October 24, 1919, to talk over the idea of forming an American Legion post. Martin Wahlberg wrote a letter to state Legion headquarters at Fargo inquiring about organizing a post,

Department Adjutant Jack Williams replied enclosing a charter application and related information for starting a Legion post at Oberon.  The application was completed, sent through channels and the approved charter was forwarded to the post on December 30, 1919. The names of the members who signed the application on the charter are: Adolph Ausenhus, Cedric Bolcom, Oral Bieri, Raymond Baker, William Carlson, Carl Gustafson, Melvin Gutterud, Olaf Johnson, Stephen Keye Oberon NDs, Arnold Krogen, William Nunn, Louis Purcells, Paul Schmid, Lawrence Smith, Chesky Simon, Charles Tompkins, and Martin Wahlberg.

At the initial meeting of this new post, Martin Wahlberg was elected the first post commander and Louis Purcells the first adjutant. Upon determining that there was the need for a post constitution and by-laws, a committee was appointed to develop this document for subsequent approval by the post.

Namesake

Gerald Aaron Haskin was born in Wells, Minnesota on December 4, 1900.  He enlisted at Grand Forks, North Dakota on January 29, 1918.  He died on January 9, 1919 and is buried at Oberon, North Dakota. He was the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. O.C. Haskin.

History

Post Home

For quite a few years the post held meetings at different sites and did not meet on a regular basis until some years later when the membership voted to meet regularly. Then for some time post meetings were held at the back of William Nunn’s Barber Shop. Lunches, furnished by different members, seemed to have consisted of fried chicken, bread, butter and pickles.

On January 4, 1927, a meeting was held by the man interested in building a community hall. Plans were made and every man in town and country donated help and labor. After the hall was completed, the Legion asked for a room to hold post meetings and met in this room for quite a few years. The Auxiliary also held meetings there.

Programs

There were many problems to be solved and decisions to be made. For many years the post sponsored dances, gave movies and had home talent plays. Dr. Frank Tompkins gave them a hand by coaching the plays. At times, after expenses were paid, the post netted little or nothing. But the members persevered by continuing such activities and, after some time, gained enough to start a bank account.

Many good times were had by the Legion members, for they would gather at homes to play card games or dance. Their wives and friends would join them. For a few years they held picnics – known as Eddy-Benson County Legion Picnics – at Sullys Hill Park. They arranged baseball games and usually band music by local bands and other amusements. The towns included in these picnics were Maddock, Minnewaukan, Oberron and Sheyenne.

New Rockford declined the invitation to join the group. The first picnic was held on July 23, 1923. Legion families and invited guests comprised the picnic participants.

A special meeting was held on April 16, 1923, to make arrangements for Memorial Day. Arrangements were made for a speaker and a band to appear on the program. The Legion sold 300 poppies that year. There was a march to the cemetery in the morning, and the program was held in the afternoon at the park by the depot.

The firing squad for cemetery services consisted of Martin Falstad, Nils Severson, E.S. Swanson, Charles Tompkins, Ernest May, Martin Wahlberg, Olaf Sorenson, and Melvin Gutterud. Memorial services were also conducted on the reservation at the Indian Presbyterian and Catholic cemeteries. In 1949 the firing squad from the then-existing Fort Totten Legion post took over these duties. The Post 122 firing squad conducted services at the Grandfield Church Cemetery and the Antelope Valley Church Cemetery.

The Legion sponsored the first Community Christmas Tree and arrangements for the program. It was held in the schoolhouse. The merchants furnished the candy, nuts and apples. In later years the Legion and Auxiliary have worked together on this project supplying the tree, candy, nuts and sharing the cost. The grade students present a program to the audience.

Gerald Olson, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ole Olson, was killed in WW II. Two gold stars appear on the service flag.

To observe our 50-year anniversary in 1969, a special banquet was held in the Community Hall, with Department Commander Al Olenberger as guest speaker. Our post gave life memberships to 11 living WW I members.

Plans were made on September 9, 1950, to build a Firehall, with the upper level to be used as a meeting place for the Legion and the Firemen. It was voted to ask Jens Nielsen to boss the job. Finance for the building was provided from Oberon’s share of the county memorial fund mill levy. Other organizations in the community also use this facility for their meetings. Begun years ago the Legion has staged annually, with the help of the Auxiliary, the Two-Ten party to make money to fund its activities. It has been profitable and enjoyable for the entire community.

The annual mid-summer picnic or ‘steak fry’ has been continued, held in the later years at the Legion Hall. An annual ‘Oyster Stew’ has been held for members in early December for many years, to which department officers and special guests are also invited.

Among the outstanding accomplishments of the Oberon post has been the formation of the Child Welfare Fund. Its purpose is to provide medical aid for all children, that need assistance, in the community of Oberon. During some previous seasons when we had more boys living in the community, we helped sponsor a Legion baseball team and buy uniforms. Post 122 has been steady in sending delegates to Boys State and to International Music Camp. The post donated funds to the Community Hall when it was remodeled.

The post’s all-time high membership of 77 was achieved in 1975. Two members – Gerald A. Taylor and Martin Olson – gave leadership and service at higher levels in the organization. Both served as third district commander and department vice-commander for the central region. Taylor, who was elected to the state’s highest Legion office at the June 1971 department convention at Minot, served as department commander for the 1971-72 Legion year. In September of 1971 over 400 statewide Legionnaires and friends assembled at the Oberon Community Hall to honor him at a recognition banquet. Post 122 presented life memberships to Taylor, at his recognition banquet, and later to Olson in December 1976 in respect for their commendable work in The American Legion, to include Olson’s service as head cook for many of the post’s special gatherings.

Auxiliary

Our Auxiliary received its charter on March 10, 1920. Tile ladies took over poppy sales in 1924 and helped with annual Memorial Day arrangements. Memorial Day is observed much in the same manner today, although now the program is held in the Community Hall in the morning with dinner following for the public. The Cemetery Board has provided a plot for the Legion to hold the memorial services, and a large cross has been set in cement to designate that reserved place.

Post 123 Maddock ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 123, Theodore A. Togstad Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Third District and located in Maddock, North Dakota.

Charter

The Theodore A. Togstad Post 123 received its national organizational charter on December 23, 1919.

On November 21, 1919, a group of World War I veterans met in Maddock and formed American Legion Post 123. The post was chartered December 23, 1919. There were 41 veterans enrolled from a total of 70 ex-servicemen in the area. Charter members of the post were Alvin Liudahl, E. M. Anderson, Herman Haagenstad, G. Anderson, Odin Cleveland, Johannes Anderson, Andrew Anderson, Alvin Beck, Lewis Kirkeby, Edwin Sheimo, Jens Dyrud, Earl Savold, Robert Haagenstad, Ole Tollefson, Lewis Mellum, and Alfred Haagenstad. The first post officers were: Alvin Liudahl, commander; Odin Cleveland vice-commander; Jens Dyrud, adjutant; Robert Haagenstad, finance officer; Juline Ness, chaplain; E.M. Anderson, historian; and Earl Savold, sergeant-at-arms.

Namesake

Theodore A. Togstad was born in Pelican Rapids, Minnesota on December 31, 1891.  He was inducted at Minnewaukan, North Dakota on May 24, 1918.  He served overseas in France from July 6, 1918 until he was killed in action on October 31, 1918.  He was buried at the American Cemetery, Flanders Field, Waereghem, Belgium.

History

Early Programs

On April 16, 1920, a request was made for rifles so we could conduct military funerals and attend other functions in a military fashion. Over the years, all veterans buried in the area were given full military honors. The Maddock post has always had a fine color guard and firing squad. We have participated in many state and area special events and parades. Included among them was the North Dakota state centennial celebration at Bismarck in 1989.

Post Home

Several years after WW II, the post moved into a building given to it by the city of Maddock. With the clubrooms limited in size, plans were made later to construct larger clubrooms and an auditorium. In 1966, work began on a building half a mile north of Maddock. This facility for the community is on land donated by Robert Schmid, a WW II veteran and local businessman.

In February 1967, the new clubrooms were opened and dedicated. Veterans and non-veterans alike worked side by side, volunteering their machinery, time and labor helping to complete this project. Over the years, many community and Legion events have been held in this building. A decade later, new state laws allowed gaming to be conducted in bars and clubs. The Maddock Legion began gaming and expanded to 25 sites. From this activity, many thousands of dollars were given to national, state and local veteran and community projects.

In 1990, a 16-unit motel was added by the Legion. This, along with the steak house, gives Maddock reasonable lodging rates along with other fine facilities of The American Legion post.

Recent Programs

 The Maddock School has received many donations, along with area fire departments, ambulance services, park districts, Girls and Boys State, International Music Camp and other youth-oriented activities.

Maddock’s Post 123 has sponsored Legion baseball teams since the early 1980s. Jerry Rice has been post athletic officer since 1984. His special interest is having a team so that all area young people will have the opportunity to participate in the great American Legion baseball program.

The Maddock Sons of The American Legion Squadron was chartered February 1, 1935. During and after WW II, it was inactive. On Dec. 14, 1989, the charter was activated with many area sons of Legionnaires as members. Many of the early SAL members are now enrolled as Legionnaires. On Dec. 5, 1990, Maddock received a charter for Voiture 1595 of the 40 et 8 organization. We’ve sponsored many fundraisers and our special projects have been a nurses training scholarship and the Carville Star publication.

Theodore A. Togstad Post 123 had an all-time high membership of 189 in 1970. In 1994, the membership was 130.

Service Beyond the Post

Three Maddock Legionnaries served as District 3 commander: H. J. Hugelen, 1939-40; Lonnie Nelson, 1985-86, and Larry Summers, 1989-90. Nelson was department vice-commander for the Central Region during 1986-87. In 1989, he was elected to serve a three-year term as the Central Region member on the department executive committee, and then reelected in 1992 for a second term.

Auxiliary

Maddock’s Legion post has been very fortunate in having an active Legion Auxiliary unit. Through the years, the ladies have supported all the Legion programs and so many others on the local level. A special project is presenting the colors at the school preceding all girls’ basketball and volleyball games.

Our Legion Auxiliary unit was organized December 10, 1924. It was duly accepted into the organization by national and state July 8, 1925, and its charter was signed by the national president at Indianapolis, Indiana. At this time, there remains one living charter member, Addy Dyste, Churchs Ferry, ND.

Post 124 McClusky ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 124, James Roberts Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Fourth District and located in McClusky, North Dakota.

Charter

The James Roberts Post 124 received its national organizational charter on December 23, 1919.

Namesake

James Judson Roberts was born in Granite Falls, Minnesota on October 6, 1894.  He was inducted at McClusky, North Dakota on September 18, 1917.  He served overseas from August 31, 1918 until his death on November 3, 1918.  He was buried at the American Cemetery, Thiaucourt, Meurthe-et-Moselle, France.

Post 125 St. John ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 125, Carey-Dolan Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Third District and located in St. John, North Dakota.

Charter

The Carey-Dolan Post 125, initially the Vincent Kelly Post 125, received its national organizational charter on December 23, 1919. The Post disbanded and its charter was cancelled on June 15, 1925. The post reorganized and received its second national organizational charter on March 6, 1953.

Namesake

The Carey-Dolan Post 125, initially the Vincent Kelly Post 125, received its national organizational charter on December 23, 1919. The Post disbanded and its charter was cancelled on June 15, 1925. The post reorganized and received its second national organizational charter on March 6, 1953.

Vincent Kelly-This most likely is Raphael Vincent Kelly. He was born at Milton ND on July 22, 1895. He was inducted at Valley City, ND on May 24, 1918. He served overseas from July 12, 1918 to April 20, 1919. He fought in several engagements including Meuse-Argonne, Ypres-lys, and Auybrfeville (Lorraine). He was discharge at Camp Dodge, Iowa on May 7, 1919 as a Wagoner. He died at St. John, ND on October 7, 1919. He is buried at Grand Forks, ND.

Bernard J. Carey was born at St. John, North Dakota on June 4, 1925.  He entered the United States Marine Corps at Minneapolis, Minnesota on March 15, 1943.  He served in the Asiatic-Pacific theatre and was killed in action on July 21, 1944 in Guam.  He is buried at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu, Hawaii.

Russell E. Dolan was born at St. John, North Dakota on May 16, 1923.  He entered the United States Army at Seattle, Washington on June 5, 1944.  He served in the European, African and Middle East theatres.  He was killed in action in Germany on April 3, 1945.  He was buried in the Netherlands, Holland.

Post 126 Hazelton ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 126, Joseph E. Appert Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Fifth District and located in Hazelton, North Dakota.

Charter

The Joseph E Appert Post 126 received its national organizational charter on December 23, 1919.

The American Legion, being a veterans’ organization, undertakes many functions according to community needs, some of which are Americanism, Poppy Day, scholarships, sponsoring of Boys State and various sports.

Organized in late 1919, Joseph E. Appert Post 126 was issued its charter December 23, 1919. Charter members were

Dr. George Monteith, B.B. Schneider, T.P. McCarthy, Clark J. Brindle, J.O. Hamm, W.L. Preston, S.E. Kurtz, J.E. Herpes, George Chase, Elmer Bradberg, E.H. Buck, E.V. Bechtel, Gerald J. Schmallen, Leon V. Lesher, and Christopher J. Griffin.

Namesake

Joseph E Appert was born in Hazelton, North Dakota on January 23, 1896.  He was inducted at Linton, North Dakota on May 25, 1918.  He served overseas in France from July 6, 1918 until he was killed in action on September 29, 1918.  His remains were returned to the United States on June 14, 1921 and he was buried at Hazelton, North Dakota.

History

Post Home

The meeting hall was in the Zirbes Theater building, which burned down August 2, 1931, destroying all records. Then the meetings were held in City Hall and the Hazelton Bank building. During the 1950s, a fundraising campaign to build a community hall was promoted by the Legionnaires. A contract for deed was initiated during the 1950s and got into full swing the following years. The hall has been in use for public service with a nominal charge for dances, roller skating and sports. In May 1970, the post paid off the balance of its notes and celebrated the mortgage burning with a public smorgasbord on Veterans Day.

On March 9, 1973, the Legion was approached by the Lions about making the present building more useable as a community center. The post agreed to turn the property over to the community to be operated by an equal membership from the Legion and the Lions. In this small community of limited resources and people (population 225), restoration and continued functioning of the Community Hall could not have been accomplished without the Lions involvement.

Programs

Over the years with about 38 Legion members and 57 Auxiliary members, the post has provided the impetus for commemorating annual Memorial Day and Veterans Day observances. A St. Patrick’s Day buffalo supper, a new project, is in its second year.

Auxiliary

The American Legion Auxiliary is an aide to The American Legion. The Auxiliary’s main goals are justice, freedom, democracy and loyalty. The purpose of the organization is service to the community, state and nation. Unit No. 126 of the Auxiliary was organized in 1923 and was issued its charter May 23, 1924. Charter members were Jane Kunsch Anderson, Martha Irene Schneider, Mary E. Forsythe, Mrs. Mary Jane Batzer, Catherine Rush, Otilla A. Kurtz; Helen Irene Barstrom, Mrs. F.W. Orthmeyer, Mrs. G.C. Walker and Olive McManus.

The meetings were held in the Zirbes Theater. Fundraising activities included socials, dances, bazaars, theatrical plays and fortune telling. Except for the U.S. flag, the unit lost all its records in the August 2, 1931, fire. After that, space was rented in City Hall and the basement of the bank building. Meetings were held in homes of members until recently, when the ladies began to meet at the Community Hall. The unit meetings are held on the same night as the Legion post to save transportation and heat for the building.

During the bank crash of the 1930s, the Auxiliary lost all its cash deposits of over $1,300. During the 1950s, the Auxiliary assisted the Legion in the building fund.

In the 1950s, the Auxiliary was honored by having two members selected to serve as district officers and delegates. Mrs. Paul Kurtz was Fifth District president and also a delegate to the national convention in Miami, FL, and Mrs. May Berkholz was Fifth District committeewoman.

In the 1980s, Arlene Davis was elected president of the Fifth District and has served as chair of most department committees.

Post Officers

Post YearCommanderAdjudant
1919-20Dr. George MonteithB.B. Schneider
1920-21W.L. PrestonT.P. McCarthy
1921-22T.P. McCarthyB.B. Schneider
1922-23E.C. WalkerB.B. Schneider
1923-24No recordB.B. Schneider
1924-26J.E. HayesB.B. Schneider
1926-28Peter ReichB.B. Schneider
1928-29Stanley E. KurtzB.W. Thompson
1929-30P.B. OrthmeyerStanley E. Kurtz
1930-31George A. CaseEllis H. Buck
1931-32E. HulsetherEllis H. Buck
1932-33Tony AppertHarry G. Johnson
1933-34C.C. WiemalsJohn G. DeFrance
1934-35Math StraumerJohn G. DeFrance
1935-36Dr. George MonteithJohn G. DeFrance
1936-37John C. KertzmanJohn G. DeFrance
1937-38Harry S. ReamannJohn G. DeFrance
1938-40E.M. JensenJohn G. DeFrance
1940-41B.P. OrthmeyerB.W. Thompson
1941-42S.S. TracyB.W. Thompson
1942-43Lewis DavenportB.W. Thompson
1943-44Ernest WrightB.W. Thompson
1944-45Melvin P. SimpkinsB.W. Thompson
1945-46Jacob ZollerAlgie Simpkins
1946-47John R. JacksonAlgie Simpkins
1947-48Garry O’CallahanJohn R. Jackson
1948-50Ephraim ZacherJohn R. Jackson
1950-51James E. FarreyCalvin Kurtz
1951-52Neil ThompsonBert A. Thompson, Jr.
1952-53Leo WeberBert A. Thompson, Jr.
1953-55Calvin KurtzEugene M. Shea
1955-56Paul W. KurtzNorbert Reich
1956-57Paul W. KurtzSimon Gimbel
1957-59Phillip KurtzSimon Gimbel
1959-60Elmer BakerOscar L. Wasen
1960-61R.D. HegeholzOscar L. Wasen
1961-62Stan PeerboomOscar L. Wasen
1962-65Elmer BakerOscar L. Wasen
1965-66Lawrence LammertOscar L. Wasen
1966-68Harry C. OppOscar L. Wasen
1968-70Elden JensenOscar L. Wasen
1970-71Robert MillerTheodore Gimbel
1971-72Robert MillerFred Appert
1972-73Bruce GreunfelderElmer Baker
1973-74Edwin GartnerElmer Baker
1974-76Darwin L. OppElmer Baker
1976-77Darwin L. OppDuke W. Rosendahl
1977-79Darwin L. OppGarry O’Callahan
1979-80Felix VetterGarry O’Callahan
1980-82Felix VetterJohn Schanilec
1982-83Ervin BakerJohn Schanilec
1983-86Felix VetterEmil Humann
1986-94Ruben HumannEmil Humann

Post 127 Bowbells ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 127, Carl Oftedahl Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Sixth District and located in Bowbells, North Dakota.

Charter

The Carl Oftedahl Post 127 received its national organizational charter on December 23, 1919.

Namesake

Carl Oftedahl was born at Sheyenne, North Dakota on April 21, 1893.  He was inducted at Bowbells, North Dakota on September 18, 1917.  He was discharged on October 17, 1917 as a Private, Surgeon’s Certificate of disability.  He was again inducted at Bowbells on March 28, 1918.  He served overseas in France from May 3, 1918 until he was killed in action on July 11, 1918.  His remains were returned to the United States on August 1, 1921 and he was buried at Spring Grove, Minnesota.

Post 128 Abercrombie ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 128, Fort Abercrombie Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, Tenth District and located in Abercrombie, North Dakota.

Charter

The Fort Abercrombie Post 128 received its national organizational charter on December 23, 1919.

Namesake

Named after the town it’s located at, Abercrombie, North Dakota.

Post 129 Bisbee ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 129, Halling-Scobba Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Third District and located in Bisbee, North Dakota.

Charter

The Halling-Scobba Post 129, initially the Theodore Roosevelt Post 129, received its national organizational charter on January 5, 1920.

Namesake

The Halling-Scobba Post 129, initially the Theodore Roosevelt Post 129, received its national organizational charter on January 5, 1920.

Alexander Halling was born at Bisbee, North Dakota on February 27, 1888.  He was inducted at Cando on September 18, 1917.  He died at Camp Pike, Arkansas on March 31, 1918 and is buried at Zion, North Dakota.

Scobba -May have been added for a John J. Scobba who was killed in action in WW II.  He was born at Baker, North Dakota on June 11, 1922.  He entered the United States Navy at Fargo, North Dakota on December 29, 1942.  He served in the Asiatic-Pacific theatre and was killed in action on July 24, 1945 at Kure Harbor, Japan.  He is buried at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery at St. Louis, Missouri.

Post 130 Loma ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 130, South West Cavalier County Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, Second District and located in Loma, North Dakota.

Charter

The South West Cavalier Count Post 130 received its national organizational charter January 6, 1920. In a March 14, 1922 letter from Legionnaire John Benjamin Tweeten to Department Headquarters Adjutant, Legionnaire Tweeten outlines the challenges the Post is experiencing and the work he is accomplishing to invigorate the Post. In a May 8, 1924 notification letter from Department Adjutant Jack Williams to Post 130 Commander Tweeten, Adjutant Williams outlined the need for the Post to submit its membership for the current program year. In his letter he noted the Post’s membership had dropped from 23 to 10 Legionnaires and the minimum number to maintain a Post is 15 Legionnaires by May 30th. Shortly thereafter, the Post disbanded and its charter was cancelled on June 15, 1925.

Namesake

South West Cavalier County Post

History

Post Officers/Membership

Post YearCommanderAdjutantMembership
1919-20O. H. LofgrenW. G. Johnson20
1920-21O. H. LofgrenW. G. Johnson20
1921-22O. H. LofgrenW. G. Johnson23
1922-23John Benjamin TweetenDuncan Gurley10
1923-24Post Disbanded

Post 131 Sheyenne ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 131, Joseph Bourest Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Fourth District and located in Sheyenne, North Dakota.

Charter

The Joseph Bourest Post 131 received its national organizational charter on January 6, 1920. In a May 10, 1924 notification letter from Department Adjutant Jack Williams to Post 131 Commander Harold Aslakson, Adjutant Williams outlined the need for the Post to submit its membership for the current program year. In his letter he noted the Post’s membership had dropped 8 Legionnaires and the minimum number to maintain a Post is 15 Legionnaires by May 30th. Shortly thereafter, the Post disbanded and its charter was cancelled on June 15, 1925.

Namesake

Joseph Bourest—It appears that the last name is incorrectly spelled.  In the WW I books there is a Joseph William Bouret, with NO S in it and it most likely is Bouret.  Joseph William Bouret was born in Sheyenne, North Dakota on September 7, 1892.  He enlisted in the North Dakota National Guard at New Rockford on October 1, 1917.  He served overseas from December 15, 1917until he was killed in action on May 27, 1918.  He was posthumously awarded the Silver Star.  He was buried in the American Cemetery at Bony, Aisne, France.

Post Officers/Membership

Post YearCommanderAdjutantMembership
1919   
1919-20Chester B. StedmanErland R. Manning26
1920-21John W. RockV. H. Thorsentson23
1921-22John W. RockV. H. Thorsentson16
1922-23Harold AslaksonP. F. Paulson8
1923-24Post Disbanded  

Post 132 Gardner ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 132, Helmer Ellenson Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, First District and located in Gardner, North Dakota.

Charter

The Helmer Ellenson Post 132, initially the Gardner Post 132, received its national organizational charter on January 2, 1920.

Namesake

Helmer Ellenson was born at Gardner, North Dakota on November 5, 1894.  He was inducted at Fargo on March 28, 1918.  He served overseas from May 3, 1918 until he died on September 30, 1918 from wounds received in the Meuse-Argonne Offensive.  He is buried at the American Cemetery, Meuse-Argonne, France.

Post 133 Turtle Lake ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 133, Lawrence Stephenson Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Fifth District and located in Turtle Lake, North Dakota.

Charter

The Lawrence Stephenson Post 133 received its national organizational charter on January 2, 1920.

Namesake

Lawrence Sylvester Stephenson was born at Emerado, North Dakota on March 30, 1887.  He was inducted at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri on December 8, 1917 and served in the Coast Artillery Corps, 1st Company, Cape Fear, North Carolina.  He died of heart disease on April 22, 1918.

History

Programs

 Since the organization of the post, the Legion has been one of the most active of all organizations in the community. Most of the notable activities have always been supported or headed by the Legion membership. Practically all of the publicly supported youth activities have been headed and supported by the Legion and the Auxiliary.

Post Home

The regular meetings of the post were held in the Turtle Lake City Hall until 1955, when an extensive building project was undertaken by the post and a building was constructed. It contains a club room and a large auditorium, which has been used for many public functions as well as district Legion meetings. This has become the “hub” of most public gatherings.

After the City Hall was destroyed by fire, the Legion hall was the “seat” of city government until the city could build a proper City Hall. Along with this, the Legion provided space for other groups that needed a place to gather. Most of these groups were provided the facilities at no charge. Thus the Legion has truly been a “full service” organization to the community.

Programs

The membership of the local Legion has provided leadership to the state level of the Legion in the form of district and state level officers as well as a state president of The American Legion Auxiliary.

Boys and Girls State programs have been supported extensively by the Legion and the Auxiliary. Memorial Day services held at Turtle Lake have been declared as The Legion and Auxiliary have been outstanding in the state by many state-level officers who have attended our services.

Our post and unit have received many all-time honors in membership from state headquarters. In one period, the post received all-time high membership honors for 15 consecutive years, climbing to a new all-time high enrollment of 164 members in 1994

.

The Legion and Auxiliary have been instrumental in contributing to local scholarship funds. A recent community improvement project conducted by the Legion and the Boy Scouts is the parade of flags on Memorial Day and other celebrations at the Legion Hall. Turtle Lake’s Boulevard of Flags provides a patriotic setting for special days such as Memorial Day, the 4th of July and Veterans Day. The flags are obtained from families of deceased veterans. This is truly an outstanding display of patriotism.

Post Commanders

Post YearCommander
1919-22B.T. Huber
1922-23R.N. Barnes
1923-24Emil Hass
1924-26R.F. Boehm
1926-27H. Seltveit
1927-30Lawrence Johnson
1930-33R.F. Boehm
1933-34W.G. Johnson
1934-35Theodore Hass
1935-39Frank Lynch
1939-41Edward W. Kundert
1941-42I.F. Zwemke
1942-44Selmer Berg
1944-46E. W. Norcross
1946-47Ole R. Gunderson
1947-48Vern McElwain
1948-49Edward R. Zwicker
1949-50Vilas R. Just
1950-51Ole R. Gunderson
1951-52Wallace Engh
1952-53Ole R. Gunderson
1953-54Roy Hovey
1954-55Edward R. Zwicker
1955-56Alvin Stenson
1956-57W. L. Braun
1957-58Adolph R. Herring
1958-59Robert Heinle
1959-61Ray Wallner
1961-62Art Gartner
1962-63Leonard Grabinger
1963-64Ole R. Gunderson
1964-65James Felland
1965-66Edward Weible
1966-67Ivan Boe
1967-68Frank D. Bauer
1968-69Clarence Edinger
1969-70Robert Hochsprung
1970-71Allan Sondrol
1971-72Clarence Edinger
1972-73Arvid Johnson
1973-74Roger V. Boe
1974-75Glen H. Weible
1975-77Leo Reiser, Jr
1977-78Ted Newmiller
1978-79Craig Lakoduk
1979-80Willie Schneider (Part)
1979-81Emil Kuntz
1981-82John Hausauer
1982-83Richard Nathan
1983-84Robert O’Shea
1984-86Allan Laib
1986-87Eugene Jacobs
1987-88Doyle Becker
1988-91Walter Flemmer
1991-92Clarence Edinger
1992-93Walter Flemmer
1993-94Richard Nathan

Post 134 Stanley ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 134, Charles L. Hartman Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Ninth District and located in Stanley, North Dakota.

Charter

The Charles L. Hartman Post 134 received its national organizational charter on January 2, 1920.

Namesake

Charles L. Hartman was born at Murray, Indiana on January 11, 1896.  He was inducted at Stanley, North Dakota on March 29, 1918.  He served overseas from May 3, 1918 until he was killed in action on September 28, 1918.  He was buried at the American Cemetery at Meuse, France.

Post 135 McVille ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 135, Ole Semling Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, Second District and located in McVille, North Dakota.

Charter

The Ole Semling Post 135 received its national organizational charter on January 5, 1920.

December 20, 1919, marked the first chapter of McVille’s Ole Semling Post 135 in The American Legion. On that date the completed application for a post of The American Legion was forwarded through channels to secure a charter.

The post’s 15 charter members were Carl Quanbeck, W. L. McMillan, Ole Larson, Arthur Quanbeck, Edgar N. Mickels, Roy C. Heron, Carl Kroke, Clarence E. Gudin, Leo Rohrer, Arnold M. Bjerke, Manford Kabeary, Selvin Nygard, P. M. Oslie, Selmer Christenson, and Elvin Nelson. National Headquarters issued charter to Post 135 on January 5, 1920.

Namesake

Ole Semeling Jr. was born in Valders, Norway on June 6, 1893.  He was inducted at Lakota, North Dakota on May 24, 1918.  He served overseas from August 8, 1918 until he was killed in action on October 13, 1918.  He was buried at the American Cemetery, Meuse-Argonne, France.

History

Programs

From its start this Legion post has served the community and worked to preserve the memories of America’s patriotic holidays. For most years of its history, the Legion has sponsored summer baseball programs. The local post has contributed to the community hospital and athletic fields. On Memorial Day the Legion post has honored American’s soldiers by cemetery visitations with honor guard and flowers or grave markets. A Veterans Day dinner dance with speaker has been an annual fixture of this community since the holiday was initially established as Armistice Day.

Since The American Legion began holding its week-long Boys State citizenship-training program, the McVille Legion has done its part in sponsoring young men to attend this annual session to learn how government operates.

The baseball program was initiated in the spring of 1920. Except for lapses caused by the depression and World War

II, it has been run continuously since that time. Each summer 35 to 40 boys are coached in T-Ball, PeeWee and Babe Ruth leagues. For the most part, the baseball program has flourished on donations, raffles and functions sponsored by Post 135.

Our Legion post has always been active in the district, state and national functions of The American Legion. As the organization grew, it achieved increasing stature and influence through the years. National security and rights and benefits for veterans have been the focus of much of the Legion’s clout. Following each major conflict, The American Legion has led initiatives to enact or improve compensation, pension and GI benefits at the federal level and to acquire bonuses and other aid at the state level. In addition to the important needs served by these programs, they also are a continuing recognition of America’s fighting men and women.

As an example of how the Legion works on pending federal or state legislation, our post has made extensive use of petitions and lobbying, often turning to the community for support of its causes, such as from the Vietnam Veterans bonus bill to an improved compensation for disabled WW I veteran Elvin Nelson.

An example of how the Legion works internally to advance an idea was a proposal made by Clifford Boostrom at the May 1966 post meeting urging that The American Legion establish a Paid for Life membership program. The proposal advanced from post to state, then finally to the national level. This recommendation was considered a good alternative to members paying dues annually. The American Legion subsequently adopted a national Paid-Up-for-Life membership plan.

Two of our members – Al Olenberger and Curtis O. Twete – have contributed to the leadership chain in the organization. Olenberger was department commander in 1968-69 and Twete was state commander during 1990-91. Both also served on national committees and Twete was the 1993-94 national vice-commander.

Service to the community has gone beyond social functions. When McVille was threatened with the loss of the community hospital, doctor and pharmacy, Legion members raised money to return those needed services. Post-owned equipment is in use at the community hospital now.

When the community needed a warning flasher in 1954 to make the streets safe, the local post purchased one. When floods struck in 1927 and 1937, the Legion members donated time and money toward relief for farmers.

Ole Semling Post 135 ranks third in the state for having 29 consecutive all-time high years in membership, recording an enrollment of 130 members in 1994 – our 75th year. Our officers for that year were: Lowell Peterson, commander; Jerry Enstad and Joe Thompson, vice-commanders; Curtis O. Twete, adjutant; Morris Aaser, historian; Don Swenseth, sergeant-at-arms; Oren Resendahl, service officer; Elmer Pederson, chaplain, and John Mullen, finance officer.

Membership

Ole Semling Post 135 honored its three 50-year members by presenting them life membership awards in the post during the 50th Anniversary observance of the post and the Auxiliary unit held at the McVille City Auditorium on March 1, 1969.

Recognized were two charter members of the post, Edgar N. Mickels and Selvin L. Nygard. Legionnaire Mickels was present for the program; however, Legionnaire Nygard, at that time a patient at the Fargo VA Hospital, was represented by his three sons of Fargo … Legionnaire Lund, then residing in California, was honored in absentia.

Speaker of the evening was Department Commander Al Olenberger, who also made the presentations of framed Golden Year Life Member certificates, pocket membership cards, cap patches and lapel pin attachments to the honored Legionnaires.

Post 135 Commander Lowell Peterson presented each honoree with a desk size U.S. Flag with emblem and engraved plate attached, for the post. Mickels responded by expressing his personal appreciation for the recognition, and Nygard’s sons conveyed their gratitude on behalf of their father.

Members of the McVille American Legion Auxiliary were the hostesses and prepared and served the banquet preceding the program, which included a large contingent of visiting state Legion and Auxiliary officials. A McVille School vocal quartet provided musical selections, and Landis Bjornstad, McVille’s Legion Oratorical Contest contestant, gave his oration on “The Preamble to the Constitution”

Post Home

It may be cold outside but never inside McVille’s hospitable American Legion home. This expanded and remodeled Legion facility was dedicated on March 13, 1970. Past National Adjutant Earnest N. Schmit was the dedicatory speaker.

Post 136 Rock Lake ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 136, Rock Lake Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Third District and located in Rock Lake, North Dakota.

Charter

The Rock Lake Post 136 received its national organizational charter on January 5, 1920. The Post disbanded and its charter was cancelled on May 17, 1928.

Namesake

Rock Lake Post was named after the town where it was located

History

Post Officers/Membership

Post YearCommanderAdjutantMembership
1919   
1919-20H. A. LathamW. C. Lindsey28
1920-21William GlanderW. C. Lindsey24
1921-22William GlanderErnest Hoyme20
1922-23William GlanderErnest Hoyme 
1923-24Alfred OlsonErnest Hoyme 
1924-25Alfred OlsonErnest Hoyme 
1925-26No RecordVerne R. Burkholder 
1926-27E. A. TaylorVerne R. Burkholder14
1927-28Post Disbanded

Post 137 Ellendale ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 137, Herman-Schlinker Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, Tenth District and located in Ellendale, North Dakota.

Charter

The Herman-Schlinker Post 137, initially the Howard H. Barnes Post 137, received its national organizational charter on January 5, 1920.

A request for issuance of a ch rter to form an American Legion post at Ellendale, ND, to be known as “Howard H. Barnes Post 137,” was dated December 4, 1919. The post was organized with 50 charter members. In December 1920, the members voted to change the post’s n me to “Herman-Schlinker Post 137” in honor of two Dickey County boys who made the supreme sacrifice in World War I.

The following officers were elected for the ensuing year: Commander, George W. Sears; Vice Commander, Dr. J.V. Miles; Adjutant, B.F. Crabtree; Financial Officer, Stanley J. Fleming; Chaplain, Ernest J. King; Historian, J.O. Nelson; and Sergeant at Arms, E.J. Johnson.

A regular meeting of the local American Legion post was held in the city hall last evening, when, with all due respect to the late Howard H. Barnes for whom the post has been named after, for the past year, the members deemed it advisable to change its name to read, The Herman-Schlinker Post. This change has been under discussion for some time but was only voted upon last night. It is customary to name the post after boys who have made the supreme sacrifice while in active duty and it was thought advisable to change the name, naming it after the only two Ellendale boys who died in action, both of these being members of old company K, when it was first organized.

At this meeting the annual election of officers took place and the following elected for the ensuing year: Dr. J. V. Miles, commander; S.J. Fleming, vice commander; Ed Hadley, adjutant; W.L. Saunders, finance officer; H.E. Hill, chaplain; A.A. Wolfe, historian, and Fred Schook, Sergeant at Arms.

Namesake

A request for issuance of a charter to form an American Legion post at Ellendale, ND, to be known as “Howard H. Barnes Post 137,” was dated December 4, 1919. The Herman-Schlinker Post 137, initially the Howard H. Barnes Post 137, received its national organizational charter on January 5, 1920.  Howard Hiram Barnes was born in Noblesville, Indiana on June 5, 1891.  He enlisted in the North Dakota National Guard at Langdon on July 27, 1917. He served overseas from December 15, 1918 to February 26, 1919.  He was discharged at Camp Dodge, Iowa un March 11, 1919 and died in Billings, Montana on June 11, 1919.  He is buried at Ellendale, North Dakota. In December 1920, the members voted to change the post’s name to “Herman-Schlinker Post 137” in honor of two Dickey County boys who made the supreme sacrifice in World War I.  Fred Herman was born at Ashley, North Dakota on January 16, 1896.  He enlisted in the North Dakota National Guard on September 17, 1917.  He served overseas from December 15, 1917 until he was killed in action on July 19, 1918.  His grave location is in France.  He was posthumously awarded the Silver Star. 

Fred Schlinker entered the service from Ellendale, North Dakota and served from October 28,1942 until April 17, 1945.  He served in the Pacific Theatre of operations and was killed in action.  His remains were not found.

History

Programs

In a fast and exciting game, January 22, 1920, the local American Legion team took the Groton team into camp last Monday evening, defeating them to a tune of 23 to 19, the game being staged in the opera house before a large crowd of enthusiastic basketball fans and followers.

The game was close and thrilling throughout, the outcome being uncertain up to the time of the final blast. The number of fouls called was not numerous and one could not ask to see a cleaner game played. The Groton team was made up of former university and college athletic stars, Lynch and McKenna distinguishing themselves in particular and their teamwork with the others was very good.

The local “All Star Aggregation” need no introduction her as they have been most prominent in the athletics of the city for a number of years and when one learns that they are playing, they are assured that the game will be the theirs for this bunch of athletes rarely lose game.

A return game will be played with Groton soon and plans are under way to stage several other games here during the winter.

The records will show that American Legion Post 137 of Ellendale, ND, has always been an active and effective organization in the community. The American Legion has sponsored and supported many projects over many years.

The list would fill many pages. Working with the Legion post has been its Auxiliary, which was chartered on February 1, 1921. The cooperation of the Auxiliary has greatly contributed to the success of American Legion programs.

In 1988, the Legion post sponsored and chartered the “Sons of The American Legion Squadron,” which meets and assists the Legion in its work.

Since the Ellendale American Legion post was organized in 1919, it has had headquarters in several locations – originally in City Hall, then in the Opera House clubrooms and, finally, its present location on Main Street.

When gaming was authorized by the state, the Legion post was able to make improvements to several projects. The main project was the expansion of its baseball program. It paid for a modern baseball field with new lights and an underground irrigation system. As a result of the fine facilities, the post has hosted several state and regional tournaments as well as a Babe Ruth Midwest Plains Regional Tournament. All local children interested in baseball have had an opportunity to participate. The highly successful baseball program can be attributed in a large part to Alex Stein wand, who served for many years with distinction on the department athletic committee.

The American Legion has been a regular participant in other events, such as bowling, Boys State and oratorical contests.

Our post, in cooperation with nearby Forbes, ND, Post 277 and their Auxiliaries, formed the Ellendale-Forbes

Drill Team, which has performed in local and surrounding towns and at state celebrations and parades.

Other improvements to the community paid for by our American Legion post were the memorial to all veterans on the Dickey County Courthouse grounds and an area developed at the Ellendale cemetery used for the annual Memorial Day program.

Many veterans have contributed time and talents throughout the years, all for the good of The American Legion and the community.  It is noteworthy that former adjutant, Ernest J. King, a veteran of World War I, and his son – the present adjutant – Ernest M. King, a World War II veteran, have combined service of over 30 years in that office. It is proof of their devotion to duty and well-deserved respect throughout the state.

In 1985, the post sponsored and supported a candidate for the Legion’s highest state position of Department Commander. The effort was successful and Earl Redlin was elected to serve the 1985-1986 term of office. He is the only member of the local post to serve in this position.

Several members have served as district and regional commanders and also served on important state committees, bringing honor to their local post.

Memberships in local posts are dwindling, due to many World War II veterans passing on. It has put more responsibility of survival on the shoulders of younger veterans, who are also in short supply.

This brief history of Post 137 reminds us of the pressing need to respond to the continuing call of duty in the future because the public is looking to us for leadership in our communities. It is just another challenge facing veterans and their American Legion posts to meet that summons by upholding a portion of their organization’s preamble, which calls in part “To inculcate a sense of individual obligation to community, state and nation.”

Post Commanders

Post YearCommander
1919-20George W. Sears
1920-21Dr. James V. Miles
1921-22Ed Hadley
1922-23Stanley J. Fleming
1923-24O.C. Adams
1924-25L.J. White
1925-27Dr. H.E. Thomas
1927-28Archie Keith
1928-29George H. Staley
1929-30M.M. Dunton
1930-31O.H. Sehnert
1931-32Dr. James V. Miles
1932-33George W. Sears
1933-34L.L. Lynde
1934-36Senn D. Slemmons
1936-37Thomas M. Evans
1937-38Martin Peterson
1938-39B.E. McLane
1939-41Fred M. Zinter
1941-44Ernest J. King
1944-45Senn D. Slemmons
1945-47Ralph W. Wallace
1947-48Robert W. Coleman, resigned
1947-48Owen Sizer, completed term
1948-49Ellwood Schimke
1949-50Earl Redlin
1950-52Walter H. Miller
1952-53Howard DeYapp, resigned
1952-54Walter H. Miller, successor
1954-55Ellwood Schimke
1955-56Lavel Sailor
1956-57Robert W. Coleman
1957-58Robert L. Johnson
1958-59Theodore Nell
1959-61Robert Voorhees
1961-63Alfred Johnson
1963-64Herbert Carlson
1964-65Alfred Johnson
1965-66August E. Roth
1966-69Ray Aman
1969-71Max Hagen
1971-72Richard Rasch
1972-73Robert L. Johnson
1973-75Leo Keller
1975-76Clifford Pahl
1976-78Earl Redlin
1978-80Art Gebhardt
1980-82Alex Steinwand
1982-84Ernest M. King
1984-86Floyd Engbrecht
1986-88Gottlieb Steinwand
1988-89Ray Hill
1989-91Walter Raugutt
1991-93Ralph Widmer
1993-94Walter Scherman

Post 138 Tower City ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 138, George C. Stine Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, First District and located in Tower City, North Dakota.

Charter

The George C. Stine Post 138 received its national organizational charter on January 9, 1920. The Post disbanded and its charter was cancelled on May 6, 1932.

Namesake

George Clarence Stine was born at Tower City, North Dakota on May 3, 1896.  He enlisted in the United States Marine Corps at Fargo on May 9, 1917.  He served in France from February 8, 1918 until he died on June 4, 1918 of wounds received in combat.  He was buried at the American Cemetery, Seine et Marne, France.

History

Post Officers/Membership

Post YearCommanderAdjutantMembership
1919   
1919-20Leslie E. SansburnClifford L. Rice43
1920-21E. W. BeardsleyClifford L. Rice34
1921-22No RecordLeslie E. Sansburn30
1922-23John AljoeLouis W. Blaine30
1923-24John AljoeLouis W. Blaine 
1924-25Lloyd. H. SeymourLouis W. Blaine 
1925-26Lloyd. H. SeymourEdward J. Martilla 
1926-27Rudolph BoehmAlvin Nordahl15
1927-28Frank BuswellClifford L. Rice15
1928-29Post Disbanded

Post 139 Tioga ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 139, Tioga Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Ninth District and located in Tioga, North Dakota.

Charter

The Tioga Post 139 received its national organizational charter on January 9, 1920.

On December 8, 1919, Clarence A. Simon sent a letter to department headquarters asking for information on starting a new post. He stated that he had about 40 veterans interested in joining The American Legion. The necessary papers and information were returned to him at once.

On December 12, 1919, a homecoming supper was given in the basement of the Presbyterian Church to honor the returning veterans. Interest in The American Legion increased and Ed Ferguson and other collected the dues. The application for a temporary charter was sent to department headquarters in late December. Charter for Tioga Post 139 was issued January 9, 1920, by national headquarters.

Henry C. Hilleren was elected as the first Tioga American Legion post commander and Julius H. Larson was the adjutant.

The first charter was later lost due to water damage. The post applied for and received a permanent charter August 10, 1920. Membership decreased until 1945; then, with the return of WW II veterans, the membership rose considerably.

Namesake

Is named after the town it is located in, Tioga, North Dakota.

History

Post Home

The Legion used the Odd Fellows lodge hall as a meeting until 1956 when the post decided to purchase a building that had been a grocery store and converted it to a service club and meeting hall. The bar was quickly established. In 1968, a major renovation was undertaken and a steak house was added to the Legion home. This is still the home to the Tioga Legion.

Programs

After the discovery of oil near here in 1951, Tioga became a boom town and experienced extensive growth. Legion enrollment gradually climbed to over 300 members for two decades.

Since its beginning, the post has always conducted Memorial Day and Armistice Day programs. The Legion Auxiliary has been very active in supporting the post and has served the Memorial Day dinner since WW II.

The post has had a Firing Squad and Color Guard since WW I, but it was not until after WW II that it grew to a full Honor Guard. At the beginning, members would wear their own military uniforms when asked to perform. But, later, the post furnished the uniforms. They have always participated in Memorial and Veterans Day programs, supported military funerals for departed veterans and have been active in community parades and activities.

When gaming became legal in North Dakota, the post set up several games of chance to help support Boys State, Girls State, Music Camp, Legion Baseball, Honor Guard and other community needs as they arose. The post has been an active supporter of community functions, providing its meeting hall whenever asked. And the club has been a major source of community entertainment, providing dance bands and other programs to help keep our community active, interesting and growing to meet today’s and tomorrow’s needs.

Post 140 Mercer ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 140, Edwin G. Washburn Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Fifth District and located in Mercer, North Dakota.

Charter

The Edwin G. Washburn Post 140 received its national organizational charter on January 9, 1920. The Post disbanded and its charter was cancelled on May 6, 1932. The Post reorganized and received its second national charter on January 19, 1946. The Post again disbanded and its charter was cancelled on October 8, 1950.

Namesake

Edwin Gray Washburn was born at Windside, Nebraska on September 19, 1889.  He was inducted at Minneapolis, Minnesota on May 29, 1918 and was sent to Camp Dodge, Iowa where he died on April 11, 1919.

History

Post Officers/Membership

Post YearCommanderAdjutantMembership
1919   
1919-20Andrew M. NielsenL. L. Tolchinsky21
1920-21Andrew M. NielsenL. L. Tolchinsky21
1921-22No RecordRudolph Singer15
1922-23Andrew M. NielsenOliver M. Pickard 
1923-24William NorrisOliver M. Pickard5
1924-25Post Disbanded
1946-47Merle BergeClarence S. Logue21
  

Post 141 Dun Center ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 141, Brenden-Burkhart Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Eighth District and located in Dun Center, North Dakota.

Charter

The Brenden-Burkhart Post 141 received its national organizational charter on January 9, 1920. The Post disbanded and its charter was cancelled on June 15, 1925.

Namesake

Thorvald Brenden was born in Kerkhoven, Minnesota on September 11, 1894.  He enlisted in the North Dakota National Guard at Dickinson on June 17, 1917.  He served overseas from December 15, 1917 until he was killed in action on May 10, 1918.  He was buried at Kerkhoven, Minnesota.  Chester Raymond Burkhart was born at Viroqua, Wisconsin on September 29, 1895.  He enlisted in the North Dakota National Guard at Dickinson on July 14, 1917.  He served overseas from December 15, 1917 to December 16, 1918.  He was severely wounded on July 18, 1918.  He was discharged at Camp Dodge, Iowa on January 16, 1919.  He was awarded the Silver Star among other awards and decorations.

History

Programs—Legislative

According to the June 9, 1920 American Legion Local Post Monthly Report under the Suggests for bettering the American Legion heading, Post Commander Robert c. Hintz and Post Adjutant Hert C. Harris reported:

“At present I have not suggestions for bettering the American Legion except that I do not approve of the stand that some of the posts are taking politically and think we have no business into politics.”

Programs—Membership

According to the February 11, 1920 American Legion Local Post Monthly Report under the heading Criticism encountered in getting members? Post Commander Robert c. Hintz and Post Adjutant J. H. Helbling reported: “Neghboring post at Killdeer predicts that we will not have enough members to make a success of this organization.”

In the same report under the heading Suggestions for bettering the American Legion: Post Commander Robert c. Hintz and Post Adjutant J. H. Helbling reported:

“The subscription to the American Legion Weekly seems to disappoint numerous members for the reasons that they are not receiving their copies of this worthy little sheet. None of us want to miss what is happening in our midst.”

Post Officers/Membership

Post YearCommanderAdjutantMembership
1919   
1919-20Robert C. HintzHerbert C. Harris22
1920-21Robert C. HintzJ. H. Helbling20
1921-22K. O. GarwickHerbert C. Hanis 
1922-23E. W. GeorgeT. B. Thompson 
1923-24Post Disbanded

Post 142 Solen ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 142, Richard Blue Earth Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Seventh District and located in Solen, North Dakota.

Charter

The Richard Blue Earth Post 142 received its national organizational charter on January 16, 1920.

Namesake

Richard Blue Earth was born at Cannon Ball, North Dakota on October 30, 1893.  He enlisted in the North Dakota National Guard on August 2, 1917 at Bismarck, North Dakota.  He served overseas from December 15, 1917 until he was killed in action on October 9, 1918.  He was buried at the American Cemetery, Meuse-Argonne, France and later reburied at Cannon Ball, North Dakota.  In addition to other awards and decorations he was awarded the Silver Star.

Post 143 Cooperstown ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 143, Gordon Lindgren Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, First District and located in Cooperstown, North Dakota.

Charter

The Gordon Lindgren Post 143 received its national organizational charter on January 16, 1920.

The American Legion Post 143 was chartered January 16, 1920, with 18 charter members.

Namesake

Gordon Lindgren was born at Harlem, North Dakota on October 5, 1894.  He enlisted in the North Dakota National Guard at Valley City on June 13, 1917.  He served overseas from December 15, 1917 until he was killed in action on July 20, 1918.  His remains were returned to the United States on May 13, 1921 and he was buried at Cooperstown, North Dakota.  Among other awards and decorations, he was posthumously awarded the Silver Star. 

History

Early Programs

The post remained very active in its early years supporting Legion activities. The post participated in many community affairs and sponsored American Legion baseball. In 1932 and 1933, our post-sponsored American Legion baseball teams were the North Oakota state Legion champions.

The post initiated an honor roll board recognizing veterans from the county. The honor roll board was erected on the lawn of the County Courthouse. By the June 4, 1945, meeting, there were 663 names entered on the board and more were being added on a regular basis.

In 1944, the post purchased from the city of Cooperstown a building formerly owned by the Sons of Norway.  It was used primarily to hold public dances as a fundraiser for the organization. Many dances were held and the proceeds were distributed on a 70-30 basis, the band receiving 70%.

Auxiliary

On Jan. 13, 1944, the Auxiliary unit of Post 143 received its charter and has been a very active organization since that time.

Post Home

Meetings were held in various locations as the post did not have a permanent home. Meetings were held in the local hotel, the Knights of Pythias Lodge and in private homes. At the November 1946 meeting, a committee was appointed to secure a permanent meeting place, but the committee reported at the next meeting that there was no space available. So, it was decided to build a clubroom upstairs in the building that the post owned. At a meeting January 20, 1947, the clubroom committee reported that a contractor had been hired and the clubroom project would be started immediately. The first meeting in the new clubrooms was held March 17, 1947.

At the February 21, 1951, meeting of the post, discussion was held regarding building a new home. A committee was appointed to check out the various alternatives. At the March 20, 1951, meeting, a motion carried to advertise the presently owned building for sale to the highest bidder.

Estimates for a new Legion building were presented at the July 16, 1951, meeting. The building was to be a cement block structure, 25×60 feet, with full basement. Total estimates were $8,500 not including labor. Loans and donations from members and concerned citizens were helpful in financing the building.

On October 2, 1951, a constitution and articles of incorporation were adopted for American Legion Post 143. Using only volunteer labor, members and other community-minded persons, the building was completed and dedicated in May of 1952. The first meeting held in the new building was February 9, 1952.

Recent Programs

Post 143 has been very active in the community. It continues to sponsor American Legion baseball. Its 1963 team won the North Dakota American Legion Class B championship. The “Cooperstown Juniors,” won the North Dakota American Legion baseball championship in 1931 and competed in the then-Region 4 tournament held at Park River, ND, Aug. 14-15, 1931, the first national level Legion tourney held in our state. The other three state titlist teams in that tournament were from Winona, MN; Watertown, SD, and Milwaukee, WI, which nine won the regional crown.

Charitable organizations could depend on the Legion to support them in fundraising activities. One of the more original and successful fundraisers for the March of Dimes was a musical. “The Boxadol Show” was written and directed by Legionnaires Russel Edland and James Cussons. The all-Legion cast helped raise over $1,500 for the charity. It was performed in many area towns.

The post has been a proud sponsor of Boys State and, on occasion, enticed other organizations to sponsor a boy when the post didn’t have enough funds to sponsor more than one. Among other charities that received support from the post have been the American Red Cross, Sister Kenny, Cancer Society and the Griggs County Library.

Youth programs are actively supported. In addition to Legion baseball, Pee Wee and Babe Ruth baseball have been under the post’s sponsorship. Explorer Scouts sponsored by the post have advanced 12 boys to the rank of Eagle in one year. That is more than any other Scout troop in the state. Delegates to the music camp have been sponsored for many years. A hospital room for the local hospital was furnished by the post and Legion hall is used by the Blood Bank.

Americanism is important to the post. It places flags by businesses on the appropriate days, gives instruction on flag etiquette to students in the local school, and presents programs on Memorial Day and Veterans Day. Students also are encouraged to participate in the annual Legion oratorical contest.

Members of Post 143 have participated in department work and other related activities. Carrol Torgerson was elected District 1 commander, 1952-53; Eastern Region department vice-commander, 1957-58, and department commander, 1959-60. Other members elected to state office were Maynard Freitag, District commander, 1965-66; Vernon Kirkeby, District commander, 1973-74, and Charles Hetland, District commander 1989-90.

Post Officers and Membership

Post YearCommanderAdjutant
1919-20John SyversonRobert Widstrom
1920-21P.H. CostelloOlaf Malde (Part)
1920-21 F.M. Parsons (Part)
1921-22Paul SorvikEdwin Bolkan
1922-23A.G. CarlsonAlbert Bolkan
1923-24Martin TurnquistP.H. Costello
1924-25Alfred BolkanFloyd E. Nelson
1925-26George A. LindgrenFloyd E. Nelson
1926-27M.G. FrigaardMonroe Berg
1927-29Ralph A. HammerMonroe Berg
1929-30Harry L. ThompsonEdwin Bolkan
1930-31Olaf MaldeEdwin Bolkan
1931-32Dr. E. W. PlontyEdwin Bolkan
1932-33Floyd E. NelsonEdwin Bolkan
1933-35Albert PerchertEdwin Bolkan
1935-36Edwin BolkanJens B. Ashland
1936-37Jens B. AshlandA.M. Paulson
1937-38Jens B. AshlandMartin Turnquist
1938-40John O. DahlblomA.O. Johnson
1940-42Ralph A. HammerMartin Turnquist
1942-43George H. JohnstonFloyd E. Nelson
1943-45Eli NestiFloyd E. Nelson
1945-46E.V. EstensonTheodore M. Tvedten
1946-47Joel MoeW. A. Skjolden
1947-48James M. CussonsLawrence Lindgren
1948-49Lawrence LindgrenDonald W. Loder
1949-50Donald W. LoderDaniel Olgaard
1950-51Mervin SkaufelDaniel Olgaard
1951-52Carrol TorgersonAlvin Boe
1952-53Mervin SkaufelIvan Hendrikson
1953-54Oscar G. TangPaul G. Haerter
1954-55Alvin T. BoeGeorge Perchert
1955-56Paul G. HaerterMaynard Norgaard
1956-57Russel EdlandKenneth Hagen
1957-58George PerchertEdward Larson
1958-59Kenneth DahlJohn Curtis
1959-60Kenneth HagenFrank W. Bednar
1960-61Maynard FreitagBruce Hoel
1961-62Kenneth OlgaardWalter Kerbaugh
1962-63Jack CurtisBilly Rice
1963-64Walter KerbaughKenneth Saxerud
1964-65Maynard NorgaardBert Hoffman
1965-66Donald W. LoderLeslie Herzog
1966-67Helger AndersonThor Auren
1967-68Les E. HerzogLester Zentz
1968-69Lester ZentzVernon Kirkeby
1969-70Vernon KirkebyBert Hoffman
1970-71Walter WeispfenningDouglas Edland
1971-72Ronald BraatenDallas Larson
1972-73Bert HoffmanGeorge H. Sonderby
1973-74Dallas LarsonJames Zimprich
1974-75Howard BrashPaul Bender
1975-76Paul BenderLeslie Berdal
1976-77Don BradshawMichael Thompson
1977-78Billy CushmanJerry Roaldson
1978-79James ZimprichSteve Zimprich
1979-80Michael TorgersonLee Iverson
1980-81Steve ZimprichLawrence Peterson
1981-83Lyle PfeiferRussel L. Pfeifer
1983-84Larry IversonLester Winning, Jr.
1984-85Clarence SandvigLester Winning, Jr.
1985-86James MorkLester Winning, Jr.
1986-87Roger HareLester Winning, Jr.
1987-88Lester Winning, Jr.James M. Cussons
1988-89Oliver AndersonJames M. Cussons
1989-90Charles Hetland, Jr.James M. Cussons
1990-91Arthur Mathisen (Part)Dennis Veldhouse
1990-91Carrol Torgerson (Part) 
1991-92Oliver AndersonJames M. Cussons
1992-93Charles Hetland, Jr.Diane Johnson
1993-94Dennis JohnsonDiane Johnson

Post 144 Belfield ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 144, William C. Blair Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Eighth District and located in Belfield, North Dakota.

Charter

The William C. Blair Post 144 received its national organizational charter on January 16, 1920.

Namesake

William C. Blair was born at Marietta, Minnesota on December 7, 1889.  He was inducted at Dickinson, North Dakota on May 26, 1918.  He served overseas from July 7, 1918 until he was killed in action on September 27, 1918.  He was buried at the American Cemetery, Meuse-Argonne, France.

Post 145 Anamoose ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 145, Wild Rose Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Central Region, Fourth District and located in Anamoose, North Dakota.

Charter

The Wild Rose Post 145 received its national organizational charter on January 16, 1920. The Post disbanded and its charter was cancelled on June 15, 1925.

Namesake

Likely named after North Dakota’s state flower, the Wild Rose.

History

Post Officers/Membership

Post YearCommanderAdjutantMembership
1919   
1919-20R. G. AbeleinGuy E. Abelein16
1920-21R. G. AbeleinGuy E. Abelein18
1921-22No RecordGuy E. Abelein13
1922-23Post Disbanded

Post 146 Edgeley ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 146, Henry Parthie Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, Tenth District and located in Edgeley, North Dakota.

Charter

The Henry Parthie Post 146 received its national organizational charter on January 22, 1920.

Edgeley, North Dakota, located 75 miles south west of department headquarters in Fargo, is home to Henry Parthie Post 146. The post was organized December 10, 1919, and the charter is dated January 22, 1920. A membership campaign held the first week in June 1920 brought the membership total to 61 members.

Officers elected for 1920 were: H.P. Roberts, commander; H.J. Philbrook, vice-commander; Carl H. Huckeby, adjutant; DeForrest French, finance officer; John J. Kroll, sergeant-at-arms; Harry S. Plott, chaplain, and John Breon, historian. Charter members of Post 146 were Edward A. Devener, Cecil S. Campbell, John Breon, Harry S. Plott, Charles Griffith, William R. Lee, Reed F. Noyes, John J. Kroll, Lyman W. Chapman, Carl H. Huckeby, Jesse D. Hemphill, H.P. Roberts, A.P. Ham, Otis W. Washburn, Maurice R. Salisbury, DeForrest French, Hauy Philbrook, Richard Porter, Jr., Oliver Cofell, Raymond L. Nobles, Harry L. Gereau, Harry Fortin, and William McLaren. Post 146 recorded its peak membership of 123 in 1977.

Namesake

Henry Louis Parthie was born in Peshtigo, Wisconsin on October 15, 1889.  He was inducted at LaMoure, North Dakota on April 29, 1918.  He served overseas from June 20, 1918 until he was killed in action on September 12, 1918.  He was initially buried in France and then his remains were returned to the United States on May 2, 1922 and he was reburied at Peshtigo, Wisconsin.  He was an Edgeley boy who made the supreme sacrifice in France.  Parthie was a sharpshooter.

History

Post Home

The first home for the post was in the First National Bank building. In 1974, the members of Post 146 voted to sell their meeting place, a former rural school house, and remodeled a building they had acquired. The new post home now features two restrooms, a bar and a large meeting room as well as a storage room for memorabilia and records for the post and Auxiliary. All of the furnishings from the old post home were moved to the new home when the building was sold.

Twenty large framed pictures of World War II received from the Department of Defense, commemorative of the WW II 50th anniversary, as well as the 50th anniversary flag, are displayed on the walls in the club.  Edgeley was officially designated a WW II commemorative community in 1993 by the Department of Defense. Also displayed in the club is a WW I rifle, a bell and a plaque in an oak case along with a U.S. flag, an American Legion flag and American Legion Auxiliary flag.

Programs

Our World War I members did a good job in maintaining post operations during the depression years. Two of them, Dr. L.B. Greene and Don Paul served as district commanders – Greene, two terms back to back, 1926-28, and Paul, 1932-33. Greene also served eight years (1929-37) as a member of the department executive committee.

Annual events sponsored by the post include the Veterans Day supper, at which time a speaker is invited and the members are recognized for outstanding service and service pins from 10 to 50 years are awarded.

Memorial Day is always a special event, attended by about 200 people each year. Twenty large flags are displayed every year – eight at the community service, six at Mount Hope Cemetery, and six at Mount Calvary Cemetery. The local National Guard does a presentation of colors and the salute at the cemeteries with Taps being played by a local band member. A wreath is placed at both cemeteries. Auxiliary members are in charge of the program.

Annually, the post holds a community steak fry to raise money for the baseball program. The annual wild game feed is also a big family event and a fundraiser.

Boys State and Girls State are special programs for the Legion and Auxiliary. In 1994, the Legion and Auxiliary were able to sponsor 11 boys and three girls. Music camps for boys and girls are also on the agenda for them. Two or three students are sponsored to the International Music Camp each year.

Youth baseball has been sponsored by The American Legion in Edgeley for more than 50 years. Many trophies won by Legion baseball teams are displayed in the Legion home. Baseball has always been the leading event in the community and enjoys full community support. In 1994, a total of 123 youth were enrolled in the program consisting of a Legion team, Babe Ruth team, T-ball team and Pee Wee team.

A “Field of Dreams” project was begun in 1994 which, when completed, will consist of a new baseballIsoftball complex. Plans include a baseball field with a large parking lot, covered grand stand, concession stand and handicap accessible restrooms. The lighting of the baseball field is planned for 1997. The cost of the lighting is estimated at $70,000. The idea for the “Field of Dreams” began when 16 acres of land was donated by Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Hazzard, now of Boulder, CO.

Robert Brandenburger, a contractor, was hired to survey and move the dirt for the baseballIsoftball field. Many Legion members and local residents agreed to pitch in to complete the job. The cost of the project is estimated to be $165,000, plus the lights at $70,000.

Officers for 1994 are: Joe Neis, commander; Carl Ross, Jr., vice commander; Rick Gutschmidt, secretary; E. Jerry Ham, finance officer; Robert Wiederrick, adjutant; Marvin Wegenast, service officer; Marke Roberts, athletic officer; Merritt Ogren, sergeant-at-arms; Jerry Lagodinski, gaming chairman. We concluded that year with 73 members.

Post 147 Park River ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 147, Paul Farup Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, Second District and located in Park River, North Dakota.

Charter

The Paul Farup Post 147 received its national organizational charter on January 22, 1920.

On February 12, 1920, ex-servicemen from the Park River area met to organize what came to be known as Paul Farup Post 147 of The American Legion. An election at the organizational meeting named these charter officers: C.F. Harris, commander; W.L. Dougherty, vice-commander; E. M. Harris, adjutant; G.I. Mauritson, finance officer, T.I. Dahl, historian; Dr. C. W. Robertson, chaplain, and P.O. Overby, sergeant-at-arms. A March 23, 1920, smoker by the post is credited with diffusing unfounded criticism about the purpose of the Legion. Legionnaires made it clearly understood that 100 percent Americanism was its prime goal, and that efforts always would be the case. The post name was taken to honor and memorialize former Co. A., 164th Infantry member Paul Farup, who was killed in battle action in France.

Namesake

Farup enlisted August 18, 1917, at Grafton in Co. C, 1st Infantry, North Dakota National Guard, which later became the Army’s famed 1641nfantry. Sent overseas in December, he served with Co. E., 18th Infantry, to the time of his death, July 12, 1918. He served in several offensive and defensive battles before he was killed in action.

Farup’s remains are buried in Grave 23, Row 8, Block C, in the Oise-Aisne American Cemetery, Seringes-et-Nesles, Aisne, France. He was posthumously cited for gallantry in action and meritorious services and would have been entitled to wear the silver cross.

History

Programs

To accommodate the community-wide interest in Legion baseball, Park River Legionnaires built a ball park in 1930, following up with extensive work on the grounds the next year preparing for Post 147’s accepted invitation to host the 1931 Regional tournament in mid-August. Park River was the first post in North Dakota to host a national level Legion baseball tourney. District Athletic Officer J.A. (Jack) Halberg of Park River led the effort to bring this big athletic event to our home town.

Also, in 1931, the World War I buddies pulled together to build a 92 x 120 foot coliseum. Later, they added a canteen on the south end of the building and had a beer garden. Their first big activities were 5-cent dances.

The post got a tract of land from Dr. C. W. Robertson in 1950 and built a 32 x 65 foot, two-story structure with a bar in the basement and an auditorium upstairs. Many post and community activities were held there. A block building on ground level was added in 1963 for a steakhouse and lounge operated by private individuals; the space was remodeled in 1972 for a bar and lounge.

In 1950, the post spent $1,20b to erect a memorial monument to veterans.

Sixty-seven different Post 147 members have served as post commander. They include: 21 – WW I, C.F. Harris, first commander; 27 – WW II, David R. Lawson, first WW II commander; 5 – Korean War, Carl Nelson, first commander of Korean War service, and 14- Vietnam War, James Daley, our first Vietnam War commander. Four of our members have served as district commander: Dr. F.E. Weed, 1932-33; David R. Lawson, 1954-55; Arnold J. Stockstad, 1963-64, and Milton Hjelmstad, 1987-88.

Dr. Weed also represented the Eastern region on the department executive committee for 15 years, 1934-49. Stockstad served as 1964-65 department vice-commander for the Eastern region, and he led the Department of North Dakota as its 1969-70 commander. He had additional Legion service as 1965-69 department historian and 1977 – 78 national historian.

Legion baseball has had a strong presence in Park River over the years, with Post 147 teams winning the State Class B titles in 1960 and 1967. Our post also has sponsored and supported many other programs and activities in the community. Post 147 is grateful for the wonderful help received from its dedicated Auxiliary. The post’s top membership of 181 was achieved in 1978 and its 1994 membership was 167.

Auxiliary

The Park River American Legion Auxiliary organized in the era that Paul Farup Post 147 commenced operations after World War I. The unit’s first president was Mrs. F. E. Weed and its charter date was May 16, 1922. Beginning with 34 charter members, the Auxiliary membership increased to 150 in the early 1990s.

Our unit has supported the Auxiliary’s Gift Shop program at the Fargo VA Hospital since its inception. We also made lap robes and comfort boxes in addition to contributing to coffee parties for the patients there.

We have regularly sent delegates to Girls State, sponsored Girl Scouts, scholarships, Poppy Day and poster contests and provided flags to our school in emphasizing flag etiquette.

The ladies of our Auxiliary have worked closely with the Legion in conducting Memorial Day and Veterans Day observations, making floats for the annual 4th of July parade and helping with numerous community projects. For many decades, our unit operated the canteen during events at the coliseum. This has been a major source of income to finance local Auxiliary programs and activities.

Post 148 Milnor ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 148, Albert Smith-Lewis Thune Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, Tenth District and located Milnor, North Dakota.

Charter

The Albert Smith-Lewis Thune Post 148 received its national organizational charter on January 22, 1920.

A meeting of the ex-servicemen of World War I was held at the residence of F.W. Vail of Milnor on January 5, 1920, to organize a post of The American Legion. Temporary officers were W.H. Payne, chairman, and John Edstrom, secretary. The following officers were elected: Commander – D.L. Vail; Adjutant – John Edstrom; Finance Officer – W.U. Payne; and, Chaplain – O.G. Bergbson.

The charter was applied for and granted to Smith-Thune Post by: the National Executive Committee on January 22, 1920, with the authorization to form a post in the Department of North Dakota. It was assigned number 148.

The post charter bears the names of 30 members from both communities. They were: Calvin J. Johnson, Andrew Jensen, Nels Anderson, Wayne Sides, Harold Wiltil, Bamford Wells, Erick Anderson, Jacob Jensen, George Hoving, Ole Tisdel, Oscar Morran, Robert A. George, Percy J. Nunn, C.O. Williams, Floyd N. Miller,

Henry H. Erickson, charles V. Payne, Emil Tveraaen, Ernest Foster, Halvor Jensen, Hjelmer W. Nordstrom, Logan Duval, Alvin Fedje, Raymond Gibbon, J.N. Kane, John Edstrom, Chris Tennefos, W.H. Payne, J.C. Rick, and Arthur P. Olson.

Namesake

Albert Smith was born in Green County, Iowa March, 1891.  He enlisted at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri on May 13, 1917.  He was buried at the American Cemetery at Aisne, France.  Among other awards and decorations, he was awarded the Silver Star.  Lewis Marcus Thune was born November 15 1982 at Superior, Wisconsin.  He enlisted in the North Dakota National Guard at Fargo on September 7, 1914.  He was called onto federal service on June 19, 1916 for the Mexican border war.  He was again called onto active duty on July 15, 11917 and discharged on August 2, `9`7 to accept a commission.  He attained the rank of lieutenant and served overseas from December 14, 1917 until he was killed in action on October 14, 1918.  He was buried in the American Cemetery, Meuse, France.

History

Service Memorial

Indicative of the public respect and pride for those who left as boys and returned as hardened and sometimes scarred men was the City Fathers’ decision to purchase a bronze tablet bearing the names of everyone in World War I action who listed Milnor or DeLamere as their hometown. The tablet was placed in the Milnor Post Office lobby to remind all patrons about who has served “over there.”

The Legion post help impressive services on February 22, 1920, at which time French War memorials were presented to the next of kin of all men who made the supreme sacrifice. The Smith-Thune Post also held Memorial Day services. The Fourth of July celebration was a grand success that year. The Post has continued the Memorial Day tradition to the present time with graves of departed comrades being decorated with flags and flowers each year.

Post Home

During the first year, the post established an open-air dancing pavilion and held dances twice a week during the summer. Plans also were discussed to take steps to build a $20,000 building. Lots were purchased on Main Street on which to build the new structure.

Membership grew steadily that first year and early records indicate a membership in the 50 range.

A temporary hall was erected on Main Street in Milnor in 1921. On Oct. 29, 1924, a meeting was held in the Chris Tennefos restaurant, where it was decided to raise money for the erection of a hall on Main Street lots. The necessary money was raised and the construction rushed to have the building finished before winter.

The first regular meeting in the new hall was held on December 8, 1924. The new building was used by the community for social gatherings and meetings. It also was used by the Milnor School as a gymnasium for several decades.

In 1934, a brick addition was built onto the front of the hall, providing for showers and a kitchen on the lower level and lodge rooms on the upper level.

In 1950, the post once again decided to build a new building and open a Legion Club on a new location. This building was to replace the “Rummy Joint,” a railroad coach car that had been serving as a card room for many years. This car was sold to a private party later.

Programs

Activities of the post through the years include Legion baseball, Boy Scouts, Boys State, Veterans Home, Milnor Swimming Pool, scholarships to oratorical contest winners and Memorial Day services and parade each year as well as observance of the Legion’s birthday and other commemorative activities.

During the drought and depression years in the 1930s, the post made contributions of fuel, clothing, food and milk for needy children and families without work.

During the late ’30s, the pheasant population in Sargent County was plentiful and several of the post members decided to have a pheasant feed for the members and their wives in the fall. This tradition continued until the late 1940s when pheasants became scarce. They then changed the menu to chicken and a crew was assembled on the second weekend in September to kill, scald and pick chickens and dress them for the dinner. Duane Tayer was the head of this committee until the creamery was closed and the post no longer picked the chickens. The chicken dinner continues on the second Monday in September. This event is open now to the public. This is also Post 148’s annual membership kickoff.

Service Beyond the Post

Several members of Smith-Thune Post have served as district and department-level officers, including Henry Nelson, district commander 1944-46 (two terms), Erwin Moxness, district commander 1959-60, and Carleton J. Likness, district commander 1969-70, eastern region vice-commander 1973-74 and department commander 1974-75. Likness also served as alternate national executive committeeman 1978-80 and has been appointed to the national public relations and the national legislative commissions.

A Milnor native and former member of Smith-Thune Post 148, Arnold J. Stockstad, was elected department commander for 1969-70 while a member at Park River, ND, and was named 1977-78 national historian, preceded by four year’s-service (1965-69) as department historian.

Post Auxiliary

May 20, 1921, which was the date that application for charter was submitted, is considered the birthday of Smith-Thune Unit 148 of The American Legion Auxiliary at Milnor.

In the fall of 1935, a call came from Legion headquarters for Sargent County’s offering for The American Legion Endowment Fund to provide  a home for orphaned children of WW I veterans. In two weeks the women of the Auxiliary had covered the county and raised the stipulated amount.

Activities of the Auxiliary include serving a dinner after Memorial Day services to all members, their families and visitors, entertain veterans at the North Dakota Veterans Home at Lisbon, observe Poppy Day, sponsor a local girl annually to Girls State, provide scholarships for students to International Music Camp and participate in the RIF (Reading is Fundamental) project.

Post Commanders

Post YearCommander
1920David L. Vail
1920-22William H. Payne
1922-23Roy R. Boatman
1923-25Robert A. George
1925-26Orrin Burgeson
1926-28George R. Mundy
1928-29Ben Gilbertson
1929-30Robert J. Thomas
1930-33H.A. Hauser
1933-35Charles F. Kuehn
1935-36Chris Tennefos
1936-37Floyd N. Miller
1937-39Calvin J. Johnson
1939-41John H. Ash
1941-43R.F. Heidenreich
1943-45Carl G. Ronning
1945-46Floyd N. Miller
1946-48Charles F. Vail
1948-49Oliver E. Halvorson, Jr.
1949-51Joseph W. Intlehouse
1951-52Marvin Nunn
1952-54Erwin J. Moxness
1954-56Duane L. Tayer
1956-57Carl Hendrickson
1957-59Roger D. Dahlstrom
1959-61Wallace G. Johnson
1961-63Marvin Larson
1963-65Kenneth Gibbon
1965-67Loynol Groen
1967-69Carleton J. Likness
1969-71Donald W. Johnson
1971-73Lloyd R. Slaby
1973-74Harold Roones, Sr
1974-76Curtis Odegard
1976-78Clayton Olson
1978-80James Robbins
1980-82Donald Lee
1982-84Loren Kramer
1984-86Gary Hanson
1986-88Marvin Knutson
1988-90Lloyd Gibbon
1990-94Clayton Halmrast

Post 149 Dazey ND

Namesake

The Olson-Lovaas-Sad Post 149, initially the Olson-Stubstad 149, received its initial national organizational charter on January 22, 1920. The Post disbanded and its charter was cancelled on May 4, 1934. The Post reorganized as the Olson-Lovaas Post 149 and received its second national charter on September 24, 1946. The Post submitted an amendment to its Post name and on April 25, 1979 and became the Olson-Lovaas-Sad Post 149.

Most likely Albert Nansen Olson who was born at Dazey, North Dakota on November 19, 1895.  He was inducted at Valley City, North Dakota on July 24, 1918.  He died at Camp Custer, Michigan on October 10, 1918.  He is buried at Dazey, North Dakota.

Emil Oscar Stubstad was born at Winona, Minnesota on January 2, 1892.  He was inducted at Valley City, North Dakota on May 24, 1918.  He served overseas from July 6, 1918 until he was killed in action on September 29, 1918.  He was initially buried at Gesnes, France and reburied at the American Cemetery, Meuse France.  His remains were returned to the United States on September 27, 1921 and he was buried at Dazey, North Dakota.

Henry A. Lovaas was born at Akeley, Minnesota on December 22, 1921.  He entered the United States Army at Barnes County, North Dakota on June 19, 1942.  He served in the European, African and Middle East theatres.  He died in service at Luxembourg, Germany on September 29, 1944.  He was buried at the Riverside Cemetery in Fargo, North Dakota. 

Richard E. Sad was born in Barnes County, North Dakota on August 4, 1930.  He entered the United States Army at Fargo on January 112, 1949.  He served in the Korean War and was killed in action on July 16, 1950.  He is buried at Dazey, North Dakota.

Post 150 Neche ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 150, Gainer-Mc Andrews Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, Second District and located in Neche, North Dakota.

Charter

The Gainer-McAndrews Post 150 received its national organizational charter on January 22, 1920. The Post disbanded and its charter was cancelled on June 15, 1925. The Post reorganized as the Gainer McAndrews Post 242 and received its second national charter on June 12, 1930.

Namesake

Irwin Elmer Gainer was born at Neche, North Dakota on June 2, 1894.  He enlisted in the North Dakota National Guard at Grafton, North Dakota on Jul 27, 917.  He served overseas from December 15, 1917 until he died on October 7, 1918 of wounds received in combat.  He was initially buried in France and was reburied at Hydepark, Pembina county, North Dakota.  Patrick John McAndrews was born at Cavalier, North Dakota on May 22, 1895.  He was inducted at Grand Forks on April 29, 1918.  He served overseas from June 20, 1918 until he was killed in action on November 7, 1918.  He was initially buried in France.  His remains were returned to the United States on October 17, 1921 and he was then reburied at Neche, North Dakota.

Post 151 Scranton ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 151, Harry W. Lindberg Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Eigth District and located in Scranton, North Dakota.

Charter

The Harry W. Lindberg Post 151 received its national organizational charter on January 27, 1920.

Charter members of the Harry W. Lindberg Post 151 were listed by Edgar Perry, finance officer, and a check for $30 to cover the membership dues for the original 15 was sent to the state organization January 10, 1920. The members were Edgar Perry, Oliver K. Ellingson, Albert B. Soehren, R.D. Potter, Paul H. Blis, Walter O. Benson, George Kable, Lyle R. Bertrand, Alvin Heinz, Earl Hatch, Joseph A. Caron, Leonard H. Peterson, Morris Iverson, Tobias Osterkil, and Thomas H. Kalisiak.

New members were added March 18, 1920: H.T. Meyers, C.H. Popp, Elmer H. Marking, Chester A. Johnson, Charles W. Snider, James Cornelius, Pat Whalen, and Frank Fox.

Namesake

Harry William Lindberg was born in Nye, Wisconsin on August 22, 1892.  H was inducted at Bowman, North Dakota on March 20, 1918.  He served overseas from May 3, 1918 until September 29, 1918.  He was buried at the American Cemetery, Meuse, France.   The American Battle Monuments Commission shows him being killed in action on September 29, 1918.  It’s possible he was buried on November 11, 1918.

History

Post Home

At a regular meeting January 15, 1920, which was held in the Scranton fire hall, the First National Bank donated the rooms over the bank to the post for use as club rooms. In January, 1921, the post paid $40 for club room furniture and agreed to have the charter framed.

The post and Auxiliary unit worked on many projects over the decades; including turkey raffles card parties, poppy sales, pie socials, white elephant sales and even selling the Legion hall and furniture when money became very tight. In this way the members were able to keep sponsoring and contributing to Boy Scouts,

American Legion baseball and, later, Boys State, Girls State, the Veterans Hospital, vocational agriculture schools and many town and school programs.

With many veterans returning in 1945 and 1946, the membership list of Post 151 increased dramatically. The post had been meeting in various public rooms since the hall had been sold in the 1930s. In March 1946, a vote was taken and it was decided to purchase the Hagenson building for $1,700 from Agnes Rogers. Twenty-dollar donations from all the members were requested; the goal was reached, and once again Scranton Legionnaires had a hall of their own.

Programs

In June, the post officers elected were H.T. Meyers, commander; Edgar Perry, finance officer; R.D. Potter, adjutant; C.W. Snider, historian; George Kohler, chaplain; Leo Snee, sergeant-at-arms, and Tobias Osterkil, service officer.

Dances were fundraising events for the Legion and in February 1921, a committee was formed to secure a reduction on the Finsness auditorium rent or dances would have to be discontinued. Dances were continued and, later, they were held in the Gascoyne hall until 1950.

On May 20, 1926, Rev. F.A.J. Meyer was the Decoration Day speaker for a program held at the Lutheran church. The parade route was from the church to the cemetery north of Scranton. The Reeder post was invited and the Bowman post furnished the firing squad, colors and color guard.

On Feb. 21, 1927, a sponsored father-and-son banquet was cancelled by a vote of 8 to 4 when a scarlet fever epidemic struck the community.

The 1920s and 1930s were very difficult years in which to raise money to keep Post 151 financially sound. The depression, drought and business closings caused many hardships, and many veterans moved away while farmers were going broke.

Starting in 1938 and through 1941, many young men of the community joined the CCC’s and enlisted in the army or other military branches because unemployment remained high.

Those from the Scranton area who gave their lives for their country during World War II were: Chester Benson, George Fisher, Dennis Ziebarth, Benjamin Grua, Elmer Reitz, Allen Young, Henry Runestead and Stanley Hubbard.

In July 1947, 10 rifles were received from an Army depot and the adjutant copied the serial numbers from a permanent record. The firing squad and an honor guard were formed and outfitted with complete uniforms and rifles.

On January 1, 1969, memorial services were held and money was given to Denis Hansey and his family when their son, Mitchell, was killed in Vietnam.

In January 1981, the post discussed the newly-offered paid-up-for-life membership program and five members signed. A motion was made and passed to donate $100 to Denis Hansey in support of his candidacy for state vice-commander. Denis was elected as 1981-82 vice-commander for the Western Region by a unanimous vote that year.

In 1960, Elsie Anfinson became the first woman member of Post 151. She was a veteran of World War II.

The 1988-89 commander of Post 151 was Bryce Johnson, a WW II prisoner of war in Germany. He is one of our most dedicated Legion members, having served in every office of Post 151.

Our post has received strong support from its dedicated Auxiliary unit. The Auxiliary furnished the kitchen for the post home, served turkey sandwiches at raffles, held a Memorial Day pot luck and provided a Veterans Day meal for many years.

In 1994, Roxanne Evans became our second female member, having served in the National Guard and the U.S. Army.

The Post 151 commander during the Legion’s 75th anniversary year was David Kurth. His associate 1993-94 post officers were Ed Miller and Jim Parkin, vice commanders; Joe Tysver, finance officer; Denis Hansey, adjutant and service officer; Alvin Iverson, historian; Bryce Johnson, chaplain, and David Rodd, sergeant-at-arms. The post ended the 75th year with 67 members. Its all-time high enrollment was 88 members in 1954.

Post 152 Fullerton ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 152, M. J. McElvain Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, Tenth District and located in Fullerton, North Dakota.

Charter

The M. J. McElvain Post 152 received its national organizational charter on January 27, 1920. The Post disbanded and its charter was cancelled on October 8, 1950.

Namesake

Michael Jay McElvain was born at Fullerton, North Dakota on March 20, 1890.  He was inducted at Ellendale on May 14, 1918.  He served overseas from June 30, 1918 until his death on March 16, 1919.  He was buried at the American Cemetery at Meuse, France.

History

Awards

On August 9, 1927, Post 152 was the recipient of the Honor Post Citation for 1927 for attaining the quota  assigned them by Department Headquarters by June 30th, 1927.

Post Officers/Membership

Post YearCommanderAdjutantMembership
1919   
1919-20John R. UlmerTheodore Ulmer20
1920-21Max KoesterE. E. Nelson24
1921-22John Dawe, Jr.Theodore Ulmer16
1922-23J. S. NelsonTheodore Ulmer13
1923-24J. S. NelsonTheodore Ulmer 
1924-25William GregoryTheodore Ulmer22
1925-26Octave CharboneauTheodore Ulmer21
1926-27A. F. WelshTheodore Ulmer21
1927-28John R. UlmerM. R. McCartney21
1928-29John R. UlmerM. R. McCartney 
1929-30Paul FeathersHenry Beyrl 
1930-31John R. UlmerHugo Wilk 
1931-32Post Disbanded  

Post 153 Wyndmere ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 153, Brown-Nelson Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, Tenth District and located in Wyndmere, North Dakota.

Charter

The Brown-Nelson Post 153 received its national organizational charter on January 30, 1920.

Brown-Nelson Post 153 was organized in the late fall of 1919, with H.A. Krebs as acting chairman. In February of 1920, the post held its first election of officers. D.W. Reed was the first post commander and H.A. Krebs was the post adjutant. There were 24 charter members, and the post grew rapidly in membership in the following months.

Namesake

Harry Valentine Brown was born in Spencer, Iowa on February 14, 1893.  He enlisted in the Montana National Guard at Fort William H. Harrison, Montana on August 1, 1917.  He served overseas from December 15, 1917 until his death on October 26, 1918.  He was  buried at the American Cemetery, Noyers, Loir-et-cher, France.  Magis Nelson was born at Tylstrup, Denmark on November 2, 1900.  He enlisted in the North Dakota National Guard on June 4, 1917 at Wahpeton, North Dakota.  He served overseas from December 15, 1917 until he died on July 18, 1918 of wounds received in combat.  He was buried at the American Cemetery, Seine, France.  Among other awards and decorations, he was awarded the Silver Star.

History

Post Home

The post became incorporated on September 4, 1930. The present building was built in 1949-50. In 1953, there was a fire which gutted the inside of the building, causing many records to be lost. It was quickly rebuilt as there were many uses for the building. It has been the center for many community and private events over the years. In 1970-71, a 16-foot extension was added to the south end of the structure.

In 1990, new siding and shingles were installed on the building, with the materials furnished by the Legion and the work performed by the National Guard.

Post Activities

Very active from the start, the post held its first public dance on March 17, 1920, and sponsored many more dances in the following years. The post also operated a theater in Wyndmere for many years.

At their regular meeting on January 10, 1921, Wyndmere Legionnaires amended the post by-laws setting their meeting night on the first Monday of each month, a tradition which has not been broken.

The post sponsors many Legion programs and is very involved in numerous community and area activities. During the past 20 years, the post has held a pheasant feed in the fall. It is a very popular event, as we serve 250 – 300 people each year.

There have been five l0th District commanders elected from our post. They were James Little, Garvin Quam, James Mashek, Kenneth Erickson, and Ken Blazer. The top membership for the post was 140 members in 1971. Membership today is still well over 100 members.

Post 154 Page ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 154, Morton-Reger Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, First District and located in Page, North Dakota.

Charter

The Morton-Reger Post 154 received its national organizational charter on January 30, 1920.

The Page American Legion post was formed on January 17, 1920. Twenty-five veterans of World War I were present. The charter application was signed by Carl Ritter, James Parker, R. C. Tenney, Martin Bjorke, Clinton Tanger, Ed Erickson, Herbert F. “Bert” Doyle, Clayton Dresher, Martin Weisensee, Cliff Iverson, Earl Parker, George Smith, Russell Woodward, John Pollinger, and Emil Holmgren. Membership increased to 33, and there was good attendance at monthly meetings.

On November 26, 1920, John Reger Post 199 of rural Page applied for a charter and it was issued on November 29th. Most of the members were from Lake Township and Minnie Lake Township, where the post was located. Meetings were held in the homes of members, two meetings each month in winter and one meeting a month in summer. Post 199 disbanded in 1924, with many of its members joining Post 154 based in Page.

First officers elected for Morton-Reger Post 154 of Page were Post Commander Herbert F. “Bert” Doyle, Vice-Commander Carl Ritter, Adjutant Ralph Tenney, Finance Officer James Parker, Historian Russell Woodward and Chaplain Earl Parker.

Namesake

John Thomas Morton was born at Oriska, North Dakota on February 22, 1893.  He was inducted at Fargo on September 22, 1917.  He served overseas from May 11, 1918 until he died on September 22, 1918 of wounds received in combat.  He was initially buried in France.  His remains were returned to the United States on November 18, 1920 and he was reburied at Page, North Dakota.  John Peter Reger was born at Lexington, Minnesota on July 14, 1894.  He was inducted at Fargo on March 28, 1918.  He served overseas from April 25, 1918 until he was killed in action on September 28, 1918.  His remains were returned to the United States on July 25, 1921 and he was buried at Page, North Dakota.

History

Programs

The first meetings were held in Lindsey’s Hall. Among other early members of the Morton-Reger Post were; World War I veterans Matt Doyle, Lyle Armstrong, William Barnes, Frank Collins, A.T. Hoffmeyer, Ed Erickson, Emil Willberg, Horace Dorothy, Percy P. Stremel, William Dahm, Henry W. Jungnitsch, Frank Curfman, William Stremmel, Leo Johnk, Vern Danforth, Floyd Rintoul, Frank Campbell, T.H. Daigle, C. Dorothy, Ralph Wallace, James E. Morgan, Cliff Barnes, Charles Whitmore, Jim Nevins, H. D. Ottinger, Arnold Bankers, J. Wilson, C.N. Wallace, Herman Bjorke, M.O. Bjorke, H. L. Vestal, Nelson B. Chamberlain, Roy Prince, Ernest Evert, Earl Ritter, Harvey Kenward, and Olaf Johnson.

Post 154 was disbanded in 1935 due to lack of membership and the Depression. A new charter was issued in 1940, just before World War II. Olaf Johnson was post commander, and Frank Collins was adjutant.

Veterans returning home from World War II joined the Legion post and, in 1948, a raffle was held to raise money to build a Legion hall. In 1949, the land was acquired from James Noble to build on the city’s south side. The land was deeded April 20, 1949. The basement was dug and, with the help of John Jess and other Legion members and volunteers, the Legion Hall was built. Many businesses, veterans and individuals made contributions to help pay for the cost of the building.

After WW II, our top membership of 74 was reached in 1946. Our 1994 membership was 48, which includes veterans from Moorhead, MN; Fargo, West Fargo, Hope and Buffalo, ND; Texas and Washington, as well as Page.

During the years following WW II, when our post had more members, we were involved in more community activities, such as helping organize the state tractor pulling ontest, American Legion baseball (Page won the Legion’s 1952 Class B state championship), Boy Scouts, sponsoring delegates to Boys State and sending students to International Music Camp.

We participate in many community activities during the year. On Memorial Day, we have a program for the public in the Page School gym and at the Page Cemetery, where we place flags on the graves of veterans and read the honor roll of deceased veterans. The post’s firing squad renders a salute to the dead, Taps played and the program closes with a prayer. A dinner is served in the school cafeteria.

In 1993, we had a new concrete memorial erected in the Page Cemetery. The memorial was dedicated to the men and women who have served their country. The new memorial replaced one that was crumbling and did not have a fitting inscription. Since we no longer used the Legion Hall for meetings, it was sold to be used for an antique shop.

Seven of our World War II veterans – William Baasch, Willis Cochran, Clarence Krogsgaard, Ted Jondahl, Clarence and Lloyd Rutherford and C. C. Stevens – are commended for their 49 years of continuous membership and service in The American Legion, spanning 1946 and the organization’s diamond anniversary year in 1994.

The Legion seeks to advance the aims and interests of veterans, continue friendships formed during military service and to see that disabled veterans receive the care and help they need. The Legion promotes the American way of life at local, state, regional and national levels. The Legion has gone on record repeatedly as being opposed to communism, fascism, or any form of totalitarianism. Its youth activities work to build American ideals.

Auxiliary

Morton-Reger Auxiliary Unit 154 is very active, with veteran’s affairs and rehabilitation receiving the first priority, and also participates in programs of Americanism, children and youth, community service, education, sponsoring Girls State delegates and the poppy program. Unit members try to educate and encourage the proper respect to the flag and present small flags to kindergarten children each year.

The unit visits the North Dakota Veterans Home at Lisbon once a year, bringing lunch and sponsoring bingo. The unit also is responsible for the program at the Memorial Day service and the dinner, which is served with the help of the Legion post. The Auxiliary unit’s first charter was issued on April 20, 1922. Then the unit did not meet for a few years, so the second charter was issued January 31, 1929. In 1958, there were 58 members. Present membership is 28.

Post 155 Granville ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 155, Burchett-Beck-Barnett-Brown Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Western Region, Sixth District and located in Granville, North Dakota.

Charter

The Burchett-Beck-Barnett-Brown Post 155, initially the Grandville Post 155, received its national organizational charter on January 30, 1920.

Namesake

Nelson A. Burchett was born at Collins, Missouri on November 29, 1897.  He enlisted at Minot, North Dakota on July 25, 1917.  He died at Fort Riley, Kansas on December 26, 1917 and is buried at Collins, Missouri.

Howard Mayland Beck was born at Brownsdale, Minnesota on May 25, 1892.  He was inducted at Towner, North Dakota on September 18, 1917.  He served overseas from May 19, 1918 until he was killed in action on November 2, 1918.  He was initially buried in France.  His remains were returned to the United states on October 10, 1921 and he was reburied at Arlington National Cemetery.

Harold T. Brown was born in Granville, North Dakota on April 3, 1920.  He entered the United States Army at Minot, North Dakota on April 1, 1941.  He served in the European-African-Middle East theatres and died on October 22, 1943 in Italy.  He was buried at the Granville, North Dakota Cemetery.

John Barnett was born at Sanish, North Dakota on December 7, 1919.  He entered the United States Army in McHenry, North Dakota on March 9, 1942.  He served in the European-African-Middle East theatres and was killed in action on January 5, 1944 in Germany.  His place of burial is unknown.

Post 156 Edinburg ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 156, Davidson Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, Second District and located in Edinburg, North Dakota.

Charter

The Davidson Post 156 received its national organizational charter on January 30, 1920.

The application for charter for The American Legion’s Davidson Post 156 at Edinburg was sent to the state adjutant on January 20, 1920. A draft for $32 to cover fees for the 16 members who signed the application also was included. Our charter was issued January 30, 1920, at national headquarters.

Names on that application were Dr. A.P. Flaten (commander), A.E. Vislisel (adjutant), Palmer Swensrud (finance officer), Leonard Goodman (employment officer), William Schoonover (chaplain), John Flaten (historian), Joseph N. Flaten (athletic officer), Willie Nelson (sergeant-at-arms), Emil Gire, Thomas Monson, Stephen Samson, Alfred Erickson, Hjalmer Lowe, Thorwald Lunde, Elmer Johns on, and A.S. Goodman.

Following application, our permanent charter was signed by national and state commanders in late October 1920. Paid-up memberships the first year grew to 40 out of approximately 60 ex-service members in the area.

Namesake

The namesake for Post 156 is Sigurbjorn Davidson, who was born May 23, 1897, near Gardar, North Dakota. He was inducted at Langdon, North Dakota on September 4, 1918 and died October 8, 1918, from the Spanish flu at Camp Grant in Illinois.  He is buried in the Gardar cemetery.

History

Programs

Davidson Post 156 has been the host for two District 2 yearly meetings. The first was in 1985 and the second in 1994 while Edward Moe was the district commander. He and Joe N. Flaten (1936-37) are the only two members of the post to have served in that position.

The firing squad was formed in 1920 and consisted of eight members. They were Henry Ellingson (squad leader), Willie Nelson, M.C. Flaten, Edwin Gryde, Albert Anderson, Theodore Thorleifson, Sig Engh, and Christ Tveit.

Since that time, members of the firing squad have played important roles in Post 156 and Memorial Day activities.

Each Memorial Day starts with the flag-raising ceremony at the Legion building in town and is followed by visits to nine different cemeteries across the area. At each cemetery, the graves of departed comrades are marked with Legion grave markers. The colors are posted and the firing squad marches to its position. A prayer is said and then the name of each veteran is read. As each name is read, a relative or descendent places a flag into the grave marker. When that is completed, a 21-gun salute is rendered by the firing squad, and then Taps is played. A total of 140 departed comrades dating back to the Civil War are honored. This tradition for Post 156 has been repeated for 54 years.

In 1982, Legionnaires Everett Seim and Danny Sveen formed the Edinburg Color Guard, consisting of six high school girls. It is sponsored by Post 156 and the Auxiliary. Though the members have changed over the years, this color guard has proven to be a big success as it performs throughout North Dakota and Minnesota. It has presented the colors at many of the home football and basketball games as well as numerous regional, district and state Class B basketball tournament games. Additionally, it has performed at numerous celebrations and in many parades not only in the local area but also throughout the region.

Many people have stated that the presentation and work of these young women give them the shivers and a true feeling of patriotism, which is something that is often missing in our country. The Edinburg Color Guard gets the people’s attention and makes them more aware of how they should act when the National Anthem is played and the colors are presented in a ceremony or marched by in a parade.

In addition to the color guard, many Legionnaires have participated in ceremonies and parades through the years. Post 156 has been a fervent sponsor for Legion baseball, Boys State and a supporter of community activities.

Post Commanders

Post YearCommander
1919-21Dr. A.P. Flaten
1921-22A.E. Vislisel
1922-23William A. Schoonover
1923-25Oscar A. Florence
1925-26A.E. Vislisel
1926-27Oscar A. Florence
1927-29M. B. Alvestad
1929-34Ned Wick
1934-36Joe N. Flaten
1936-39Theo Thorleifson
1939-46Dr. M.C. Flaten
1946-47Oval Monson
1947-49Orbin E. Erickson
1949-50Gilman Holm
1950-51O.J. Arneson
1951-52William Melstad
1952-53Pete McEwen
1953-54John Hall
1954-55Oli G. Johnson
1955-56Enmett Loe
1956-57Harley Thorlacious
1957-58Ernest R. Sveen
1958-59Dr. M.C. Flaten
1959-61William Melstad
1961-62Ernest Sveen
1962-63Joseph Holm
1963-64James Gryde
1964-65Gene Gemmill
1965-66Fred Holm
1966-68Clifford Hilde
1968-69John Stabo
1969-70James Gryde
1970-71Herman Zidon
1971-74Joe Holm
1974-75Ernest Sveen
1975-77Edward L. Moe
1977-78Ronald Monson
1978-79John Stabo
1979-80James Gryde
1980-81Herman Zidon
1981-82Paul Bjorneby
1982-83Joseph Holm
1983-84Donald T. Zidon
1984-85Edward L. Moe
1985-86Daniel Sveen
1986-87Ronald Monson
1987-88Clifford Hilde
1988-89Edward L. Moe
1989-90Clifford Hilde
1990-92Joe Holm
1992-93Edward L. Moe
1993-94Daniel Sveen

Post 157 Lankin ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 157, Bosh-Ryba Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, Second District and located in Lankin, North Dakota.

Charter

The Boshy-Ryba Post 157, initially the Lankin Post 157, received its initial national organizational charter on January 30, 1920. The Post disbanded and its charter was cancelled on June 15, 1925. The Post reorganized as the Bosh-Ryba Post 157 and received its second national charter on January 22, 1945.

The American Legion post at Lankin was started in 1920 and was named Emil Bosh Post 157. Robert Myers was elected commander by these fellow charter members: Halger Anderson, Henry Borgeson, Victor Bylin, William Bures, Charles Erickson, Monroe Krollman, John Lala, J.W. Matejcek, M.P. Nickolay, Tom Ondracek, Rudolph Ondracek, John Polak, William Swartz, L.A. Sherek, Jacob Shirek, Ed Wambem, and Frank Wippler. The post was active only in 1920, after which the members transferred to other neighboring posts.

On Jan. 12, 1945, a special meeting was called for the purpose of founding a permanent American Legion post in Lankin. Frank Wippler was nominated to serve as chairman by those attending. There were 17 men who signed up that evening to serve as charter members: Charles Erickson, Ole Greferud, Harold Hagen, Emil Kratochvil, Ben Lala, George Kluzak, Fred Kluzak, Frank Kuchar, Aldus Lansing, J. W. Matejcek, Harold Matejcek, W. L. Machart, Rudolph Ondracek, Harry Richards, Jacob Shirek, Cyril Sherek and Frank Wippler. Frank Wippler was elected the first commander for the post.

A motion was made by Emil Kratochvil that the post be named the Bosh-Ryba Post in memory of Emil Bosh who lost his life in World War I and in memory of Rendolph Ryba who lost his life in World War II. The motion was seconded by Frank Kuchar. Motion carried. Other men joining during the year 1945 were Clifford Loken, Vern Malafa, Gilbert Moe, Sam Omlie, Roger Vorachek and Joseph Waith. In 1946, a decision was made to set the first Monday of each month as the regular meeting date. This meeting day has not changed.

Namesake

Bosh, Emil J. who was born in Pisek, North Dakota on December 29, 1892.  He was inducted at Grafton, North Dakota on September 22, 1917.  He served overseas from May 6, 1918 until his death on May 22, 1918 when he drowned in the sinking of the Moldavia.The Moldavia was purchased by the British Admiralty in 1915 and converted into an armed merchant cruiser.  She was torpedoed and sunk on 23 May 1918 off Beachy Head in the English Channel, by a single torpedo from U-Boat UB-57.  At the time of her sinking she was being used as a troopship for United States troops from the 58th Infantry Regiment.  Joseph E. Ryba was born at Lankin, North Dakota on March 13, 1895.  He was inducted at Grafton, North Dakota on April 29, 1918.  He served overseas from June 20, 1918 until June 18, 1919.  He was discharged on June 22, 1919 and died at Lankin, North Dakota on January 17, 1920.  He is buried at Lankin.

History

Post Home

The city hall was purchased for $1,700 in March of 1947. Memorial Day services were begun at the newly purchased hall. In 1970, a discussion was held on future plans to build a new building for the post and a committee was appointed. City lots were purchased in 1972, and fill was hauled by members who volunteered their time and equipment. A motion was carried at the October 1972 meeting to go ahead with the building.

A special meeting was held on April 4, 1973, to select a building. The building was purchased from Farmland Industries, Inc., at a cost of $11,547 erected. The concrete work for the slab, with underthe-floor plumbing and a septic tank, cost $4,650. This work was done by Ray Collins Contracting.  To finance the building, $20,000 was borrowed with 15 Legionnaires signing notes at the Grafton National Bank.

The Grand Opening was held March 9, 1974, after a busy fall and winter, when many members and community people donated time and talents to work on the interior of the building. A total of $9,375 was donated by many people to help pay for the expenses. To show its appreciation, the Legion sponsored a party for workers and donors on March 29, 1974. Following the completion of the new post home, the other two buildings were sold.

Twenty-dollar ticket dinner and dance parties were started in November of 1975 and still are well attended.

The original mortgage had been reduced enough by 1979 so plans were made for an addition to the building for more seating and storage space. An additional $15,500 was borrowed to help finance this addition. The interior was finished with donated labor.

The Bosh-Ryba American Legion Club is used for many local and area activities. In addition to the Legion’s regular meetings, bingo nights and dances, some of the other uses are for wedding receptions, 4-H meetings, farm and chemical information meetings, anniversary celebrations and fundraising benefits. The local churches also use our building when needed. We are proud of our Bosh-Ryba American Legion home.

This building would not have been as much of a success without the support and backing of the American Legion Auxiliary and Junior Auxiliary. Besides financial support, they are always willing to work with us on any activity or project we undertake. Bosh-Ryba Post 157 is proud to also have the support and backing of the Sons of the American Legion Squadron that organized in April of 1987. These young men are very active at the local and state levels.

Programs

Participation in Boys State was begun in 1949 by sponsoring one boy to Boys State, held in Fargo annually.  Through the years, 84 boys have been sponsored by the Bosh-Ryba Post 157.

The firing squad began visiting area grave sites on Memorial Day 1951.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is image-122.png

The first of the annual uniform parties was held in February of 1959 in the old Legion hall on a cold, stormy, wintry night with a good crowd in attendance. In 1964, another smaller building was purchased by the post to’ be used for meetings and activities.

From its record high membership of 64 in 1960, Lankin Legionnaires commenced a string of 35 consecutive years of equaling or surpassing its previous year’s all-time high enrollment, boosting its membership gradually to its current peak of 109 in 1994. Post 157 ranks first in the North Dakota Legion for successive years of all-time high annual enrollments.

Post 158 Adrian ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 158, Emmet J. McKinney Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, Tenth District and located in Adrian, North Dakota.

Charter

The Emmet J. McKinney Post 158 received its national organizational charter on January 31, 1920. The Post disbanded and its charter was cancelled on May 6, 1932.

Namesake

Emmet J. McKinney was born at Colesburg, Iowa on January 25, 1900.  He enlisted at Fargo, North Dakota on September 18, 1917.  He died at Fort Sill, Oklahoma on December 19, 1917 of Pneumonia.  He is buried at Edgeley, North Dakota.

History

Post Officers/Membership

Post YearCommanderAdjutantMembership
1919   
1919-20   
1920-21Helmar C. KnudsonJ. P. Daly21
1921-22Emil RisheH. F. Crandell20
1922-23John W. JohnsonH. F. Crandell 
1923-24John W. JohnsonH. F. Crandell 
1924-25Ocsar BolmeDan W. Chisholm 
1925-26Dan W. ChrisholmMax Jorden 
1926-27Grand EnglandJ. P. Daly 
1927-28H. A. SchraderHelmar C. Knudson 
1928-29H. A. SchraderHelmar C. Knudson 
1929-30H. F. CrandellHelmar C. Knudson 
1930-31Post Disbanded

Post 159 Drayton ND

The North Dakota American Legion Post 159, Drayton Post, is a member of the Department of North Dakota American Legion’s Eastern Region, Second District and located in Drayton, North Dakota.

Charter

The Drayt